Encyclopaedia Metallum: The Metal Archives

Message board

* FAQ    * Search   * Register   * Login 



Reply to topic
Author Message Previous topic | Next topic
Demon Fang
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2019 9:42 am
Posts: 85
PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2020 11:50 am 
 

jimbies wrote:
Yeah, I could make a pretty killer comp of Static-X stuff for especially the first two. I still listen to songs like Get To The Gone and This Is Not while jogging.

Wisconsin Death Trip is a bonafide banger.

Top
 Profile  
rawsewage
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Jan 23, 2009 3:29 pm
Posts: 412
Location: Shamokin, PA
PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2020 12:45 pm 
 

The only nu-metal I can still stomach is some Nothingface and Dog Fashion Disco (Are they considered nu-metal?). Everything else is pretty laughably bad and I don’t know why I listened to this stuff growing up.

Who were the worst of the worst in the genre? I would put Primer 55 somewhere in that conversation.

Top
 Profile  
Vadara
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2016 11:14 pm
Posts: 225
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2020 1:04 pm 
 

The wildest thing about nu-metal is that it'll have these surprisingly heavy guitars but the vocals will exclusively be this absolutely abominable style of singing that is truly the worst thing in existence. At least the most fangless metalcore has harsh vocals. Nu-metal vocals are either terrible singing or this insufferable pseudo harsh vocals that are still clear enough to not scare any normies away that also sound like shit lmao (thanks Pantera)

Also nu-metal always sounds painfully fake to me. Like they're feigning emotion, but there's no artistry or heart behind it, which is why I can unironically love stand whiny ass emo bitch boy -core but absolutely hate nu-metal. It's just pathetic fakeness. One of the most insincere genres of music ever behind grunge. At least hair metal was goofy.

Can nu-metal claim one album that is actually unironically good? I really can't think of any one album. It might seriously be the only genre of music devoid of any quality albums whatsoever.

Top
 Profile  
LithoJazzoSphere
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2020 8:11 pm
Posts: 797
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2020 1:27 pm 
 

Deftones' Around The Fur is generally considered a classic. Aggregators also rank some albums from Flapjack, Psiheya, Level, I.F.K., Velcra, Unjust, EkoTren, Index Case, Spoken, and The Mad Capsule Markets pretty high, although they're all more obscure than the big names.

Top
 Profile  
Oxenkiller
Veteran

Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2008 3:42 am
Posts: 2657
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2020 1:50 pm 
 

Nu metal seems to have been the "Gateway" for the millenial generation to discover the harder, more underground styles of metal- Much like glam/hard rock was in the 1980's. Because I grew up in the 1980's, I was too young to really get into nu-metal in the same way as the millenial generation. In other words, bands like AC/DC, Motley Crue, Dokken, etc. were my gateways to the then-underground thrash and death metal scenes, so by the time Korn, Disturbed, Slipknot, and all the rest came out, I just thought it sounded like, well, loud and sometimes abrasive, but overall not particularly good music. I didn't go for Korn's annoying thwappy bass lines, dissonant riffs, and goofy vocals, I didnt like Slipknot's riffing and song styles, thought David Draimen's skat vocal style was annoying, and so on.

But with that said, I still think there were some really good bands from that scene that I kind of dig, albiet not many. I really got into System of a Down for a while, actually. I always kind of liked the Deftones- particularly their more shoegaze-type heavy songs, and Avenged Sevenfold, while pretty mainstream and by no means my favorite band or anything, are almost close enough to traditional metal to appeal to me.

Top
 Profile  
pressingtoplead13
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2009 6:05 pm
Posts: 446
PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2020 2:04 pm 
 

LithoJazzoSphere wrote:

Well, the topic the OP is trying to cover is a lot broader than nu-metal. He calls it "new millennium metal" and references Godflesh, Soilwork, Fear Factory, and Machine Head as well, so I'd say those sort of artists absolutely fit. But people are almost exclusively zeroing in on the nu-metal facet of it today, despite seeming kind of weary of that topic the last time we discussed it a few weeks ago. Different day, somewhat different crowd, I suppose.


Ahh, I guess I missed that and only took this as nu metal. In that regard i failed to mention Fear Factory whom I didnt include because other than digimortal never fell under the nu metal category to begin with. Fear Factory was the first band I'd gotten into, I heard Zero Signal and fell in love. From them I looked online for bands that were similar and it was when nu metal was taking off so of course they were linked with Slipknot and Static X so off I went down that path. I also discovered Napalm Death at the same time as Fear Factory and enjoyed the song I had by them but it would take me about 2 years of following all the nu metal bands before I'd ventured down the Napalm Death trail ultimatly leading me to Morbid Angel, Suffocation and so on.

Looking back alot of great albums from extreme music came out in those time periods. "Formulas Fatal to the Flesh" "Despise the Sun", "Thelema.6" "Catacombs Amongst The Nephren Ka", and "Gore Metal" all came out around the late 90's early 2000's and those are some of my favorite records ever made. Along with nu metal albums like "Iowa", "Slipknot" and "L.D.50".

Top
 Profile  
LithoJazzoSphere
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2020 8:11 pm
Posts: 797
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2020 3:18 pm 
 

I think "Zero Signal" seems to have gotten a disproportionately high number of people into more extreme genres. It's definitely what finally unlocked the harsh vocal box for me.

Top
 Profile  
jimbies
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Jul 21, 2016 2:52 pm
Posts: 2197
Location: Ontario, Canada
PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2020 9:05 pm 
 

rawsewage wrote:
The only nu-metal I can still stomach is some Nothingface and Dog Fashion Disco (Are they considered nu-metal?).


There are some really great songs on Nothingface's "Violence" album (dead like me, bleeder). I saw them open for Pantera and they were actually quite enjoyable live.

Top
 Profile  
LithoJazzoSphere
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2020 8:11 pm
Posts: 797
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2020 10:39 pm 
 

I still remember "Bleeder" being on a Guitar World sampler disc for one of the issues with a bunch of different bands.

Top
 Profile  
SculptedCold
Metalhead

Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2003 11:26 am
Posts: 510
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2020 12:12 am 
 

LithoJazzoSphere wrote:
I think "Zero Signal" seems to have gotten a disproportionately high number of people into more extreme genres. It's definitely what finally unlocked the harsh vocal box for me.


You're probably right, especially with that being the coolest song on the MK movie soundtrack, during the coolest scene.

Yet despite FF being sometimes lumped into the fringe of the nu- scene as one of its heavier bands, they aren't really nu-metal, nor was "Zero Signal" even slightly a nu-metal song. Digimortal ofc was basically nu-metal in an aggressive industrial metal costume, but like Diabolus In Musica / God Hates Us All it was more of an opportunistic scene flirtation with the popular trend than what the band really was.
Of course its going to be the fringe bands, who are marketed but whose music doesn't truly sit in the scene, that lead more adventurous listeners away to deeper waters.

Fear Factory were definitely one of the most important early bands for me too. It was obvious that they weren't playing what Mudvayne or Slipknot were, it was something else. Something way more interesting and real and obviously not "nu-metal". That was the appeal and the start of the real adventure.

Top
 Profile  
Turner
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Aug 23, 2002 2:04 am
Posts: 1990
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2020 12:23 am 
 

Yeah I was going to say: Fear Factory kinda had a tinge of nu-metal on Obsolete, but Demanufacture is - my best description - industrial death metal. Like on Soul of a New Machine they wanted to take Napalm Death's Harmony Corruption and wrap it in the Godflesh/Pitchshifter sound, then on Demanufacture they largely kept that but experimented with giving it clarity at the same time. No one is gonna argue that Digimortal wasn't an obvious attempt at nu-metal, but it's the exception in their catalogue. In a way they're almost trailblazers at both ends - not only did they pioneer a crazy new sound on Demanufacture, but they were also one of the very first bands to realise what they were doing and abandon nu-metal, haha.

Top
 Profile  
HeavenDuff
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 10:35 pm
Posts: 1727
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2020 12:45 am 
 

Not to make a middle-ground fallacy, but I do feel that nu-metal and more popular metal of the early 2000's is both worthy of the praise it gets, even in retrospect, but also of the criticism. I'll definitely give credit to albums like Hybrid Theory and Slipknot's S/T for their contribution to music, but I can't get on board with the bands that pushed the clichés and gimmicks to the extreme like Mudvayne or Static-X. I personnally think there is barely any redeeming quality to these two bands.

However, I do understand how some metalheads are going back to popular metal/nu-metal bands of that time period, as even if our tastes tend to progress towards completely different things, these were formative to our tastes. And to be fair, if we think about bands like Soilwork, Dark Tranquility and the bands of the gothenburg scene, these were absolutely killer bands that released stuff that still hold ups to my own personnal standards to these days. Sure Soilwork eventually fell victim to the core trend they helped spawn. They eventually became one of these weird old bands that mimicks commercial bands who originally took influence from them. But I mean, most of the popular bands of the time, like Linkin Park, Korn or Slipknot, all eventually released subpar material. Hence why I think that nu-metal is quite deserving of a lot of the negative criticism it gets as a genre, but I mean, for a while back then, they were doing something truly unique. You hear any song from Hybrid Theory, Follow the Leader or Iowa, and you instantly recognize the band playing.

Top
 Profile  
Turner
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Aug 23, 2002 2:04 am
Posts: 1990
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2020 1:42 am 
 

HeavenDuff wrote:
Not to make a middle-ground fallacy, but I do feel that nu-metal and more popular metal of the early 2000's is both worthy of the praise it gets, even in retrospect, but also of the criticism. I'll definitely give credit to albums like Hybrid Theory and Slipknot's S/T for their contribution to music, but I can't get on board with the bands that pushed the clichés and gimmicks to the extreme like Mudvayne or Static-X. I personnally think there is barely any redeeming quality to these two bands.

However, I do understand how some metalheads are going back to popular metal/nu-metal bands of that time period, as even if our tastes tend to progress towards completely different things, these were formative to our tastes. And to be fair, if we think about bands like Soilwork, Dark Tranquility and the bands of the gothenburg scene, these were absolutely killer bands that released stuff that still hold ups to my own personnal standards to these days. Sure Soilwork eventually fell victim to the core trend they helped spawn. They eventually became one of these weird old bands that mimicks commercial bands who originally took influence from them. But I mean, most of the popular bands of the time, like Linkin Park, Korn or Slipknot, all eventually released subpar material. Hence why I think that nu-metal is quite deserving of a lot of the negative criticism it gets as a genre, but I mean, for a while back then, they were doing something truly unique. You hear any song from Hybrid Theory, Follow the Leader or Iowa, and you instantly recognize the band playing.


Come on man, Linkin Park no more contributed to anything than I did. Their "contribution", if you can call it that, was turning a creative movement into dad rock. Fuck they sucked from day 1 - I distinctly remember hearing their first single (that "I'm about one step from the edge" POS), I was about 16 at the time, and thinking ok great, we're doing paint-by-numbers nu-metal now. Fucking wonderful. And they only got worse!! Linkin Park is the exact point where nu-metal stopped being an alternative genre, and turned into the AOR of the 00s.

Static-X might not have left their mark on music as much, but christ Wisconsin Death Trip is at least a quirky little oddity of its time (and is great workout music).
Linkin Park is Nickelback. Linkin Park is Five Finger Death Punch. Linkin Park is all those "modern country" bands that sing about drinking beer in trucks and summer nights. Linkin Park is "Pretty Fly For a White Guy" after a couple years of "Come out and Play". Linkin Park is, imo, one of the worst things to happen to rock music in the last 20 years.

Top
 Profile  
HeavenDuff
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 10:35 pm
Posts: 1727
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2020 2:43 am 
 

That whole rant was... surreal...

Hybrid Theory was more than a decent album, and had absolutely nothing to do with nu-metal. You'd know that if you actually made a real effort to listen to the music. It's mostly alternative rock, mixed with electronic music and hip-hop. Linkin Park always rejected the nu-metal label for themselves anyway, and rightfuly so. They got lumped in there because they had hardcore vocals, turntables and heavy downtuned guitars from time to time. You keep comparing this album with generic pop rock, generic punk pop and shit-tier brocore, and that's absolutely not fair to what HT actually was, which is one of the most unique albums of the alternative metal scene of the early 2000's. Sure you can criticize them for the teenage angst on some of the songs, but once your done with the juvenile one-upmanship, you can see that they are actually portraying in a very compelling way issues of mental illness, toxic relationships, inner struggles, and other thems that do speak to teenagers and young adults. I've also never quite figured how it's a bad thing that teenagers have music that is made for them. Like everything needs to be targetted at an adult audience or something.

When Bennington passed away, a ton of fans came out to talk about how important Linkin Park has been for them in difficult moments. I don't see how that compares to FFDP brodudes shitcore.

Top
 Profile  
APaleShadow
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Mar 06, 2020 5:29 am
Posts: 47
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2020 8:36 am 
 

jimbies wrote:
rawsewage wrote:
The only nu-metal I can still stomach is some Nothingface and Dog Fashion Disco (Are they considered nu-metal?).


There are some really great songs on Nothingface's "Violence" album (dead like me, bleeder). I saw them open for Pantera and they were actually quite enjoyable live.


Oh thank god. I thought he meant the Voivod album, I was about to go on an autistic keyboard rant.

Top
 Profile  
Annable Courts
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Oct 26, 2013 2:25 pm
Posts: 61
Location: Cheese
PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2020 5:19 pm 
 

LithoJazzoSphere wrote:
Unity wrote:
BTW, I must confess I don't really understand why bands like Rob Zombie and Rammstein were mentioned in this thread. To me they both have nothing to do with nu-metal.


Well, the topic the OP is trying to cover is a lot broader than nu-metal. He calls it "new millennium metal" and references Godflesh, Soilwork, Fear Factory, and Machine Head as well, so I'd say those sort of artists absolutely fit. But people are almost exclusively zeroing in on the nu-metal facet of it today, despite seeming kind of weary of that topic the last time we discussed it a few weeks ago. Different day, somewhat different crowd, I suppose.


Right yeah. This topic is an "Ode to the new millennium metal / nu metal sound". It isn't just a topic for reminiscing about nu metal. I'm talking about the sound and production methods of that particular period vs their predecessors from the 90s. The reason I'm not mentioning, say, death metal from that period is because it wasn't produced that way and didn't have that sound. I'm a huge fan of the very notion of transforming your instruments so they sound more digital than organic. Always been a fan of electronic drums on metal, and it can be done super tastefully and not sound mainstream at all btw try any "Epitome" track from Blut Aus Nord or simply Godflesh. Linkin Park had that really cool sampled drum thing going for them on the first record. Never been a fan of the actual songs but NIN had some fantastic sounding music, because the instruments were so processed and transformed, like the NIN guitar sound is nothing like just micing up your guitar cab straight out of the room. Soilwork's 'Natural Born Chaos' isn't regarded as commercial/mall-metal and it sounds super neat and is very tightly compressed, doesn't sound organic at all and is at war in that sense with anything 90s or even more so 80s.

Top
 Profile  
HviteGuden
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 15, 2019 11:24 am
Posts: 175
Location: Russia
PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2020 6:02 pm 
 

Annable Courts wrote:
Always been a fan of electronic drums on metal, and it can be done super tastefully and not sound mainstream at all btw try any "Epitome" track from Blut Aus Nord or simply Godflesh.

I'd say, in metal in general electronic drums gotta be programmed so that they sound not plastic and not synthetical. Like on Deathspell Omega albums, for example. Godflesh and Blut Aus Nord both have exactly the synthetical sound of drum-machine, but in their cases it's an advantage, because they play industrial metal and industrial black metal respectively.

Top
 Profile  
Gravetemplar
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Mar 05, 2019 10:08 am
Posts: 1295
Location: Antarctica
PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2020 6:25 pm 
 

HviteGuden wrote:
Annable Courts wrote:
Always been a fan of electronic drums on metal, and it can be done super tastefully and not sound mainstream at all btw try any "Epitome" track from Blut Aus Nord or simply Godflesh.

I'd say, in metal in general electronic drums gotta be programmed so that they sound not plastic and not synthetical. Like on Deathspell Omega albums, for example.

DsO have a real drummer. It has been confirmed by the band.

Top
 Profile  
HviteGuden
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 15, 2019 11:24 am
Posts: 175
Location: Russia
PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2020 6:37 pm 
 

Gravetemplar wrote:
HviteGuden wrote:
Annable Courts wrote:
Always been a fan of electronic drums on metal, and it can be done super tastefully and not sound mainstream at all btw try any "Epitome" track from Blut Aus Nord or simply Godflesh.

I'd say, in metal in general electronic drums gotta be programmed so that they sound not plastic and not synthetical. Like on Deathspell Omega albums, for example.

DsO have a real drummer. It has been confirmed by the band.

Oh, I see now. Gotta finally read that lengthy interview. Anyway, for me they still remain a good example of programming drums, with the side A of their debut full-length.

Top
 Profile  
LithoJazzoSphere
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2020 8:11 pm
Posts: 797
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2020 10:47 pm 
 

Annable Courts wrote:
I'm talking about the sound and production methods of that particular period vs their predecessors from the 90s. The reason I'm not mentioning, say, death metal from that period is because it wasn't produced that way and didn't have that sound. I'm a huge fan of the very notion of transforming your instruments so they sound more digital than organic. Always been a fan of electronic drums on metal, and it can be done super tastefully and not sound mainstream at all btw try any "Epitome" track from Blut Aus Nord or simply Godflesh. Linkin Park had that really cool sampled drum thing going for them on the first record. Never been a fan of the actual songs but NIN had some fantastic sounding music, because the instruments were so processed and transformed, like the NIN guitar sound is nothing like just micing up your guitar cab straight out of the room. Soilwork's 'Natural Born Chaos' isn't regarded as commercial/mall-metal and it sounds super neat and is very tightly compressed, doesn't sound organic at all and is at war in that sense with anything 90s or even more so 80s.


When it comes to drums my preference is for electronic and acoustic drums to sound different, and this contrast can give variety and differentiation to sections that incorporate one versus the other. I'm not particularly fond of acoustic drums that sound overly triggered and quantized, though I've had to get quite used to them because they're unavoidable. Good natural sounding acoustic drums when possible, and then add whatever craziness you want with manipulating electronic ones.

The NIN guitar sound like on "Big Man With a Gun" is something I've really been fascinated by. I've heard versions of it used by Marilyn Manson, Front Line Assembly and others, and it has this really abrasive, direct sound to it, like it's a guitar plugged straight into a specific kind of distortion pedal and then right into the mixing board. It sounds horrible in most other genres that try to use it, but somehow just works perfectly for that sort of industrial rock/metal vibe.

I think A Predator's Portrait has an even bigger guitar sound than NBC, but they're of a similar cloth. I attribute it to the production methods Frederik Nordstrom had developed in Studio Fredman by that point, as you can hear variations of it on many other albums around that time by In Flames, Old Man's Child, Dark Tranquillity, Dimmu Borgir and others. It's the layered multi-tracking with multiple amps, panning the tracks, his unique method of micing cabs, and whatever secret sauce he applies in further processing.

There are a few other producers who managed to capture similar sounds at times. One of the earliest tones I remember being blown away by was on Demanufacture. When you can just hold a power chord and listen to the sound oscillate and be floored, you know you've really found something. It seems like back then they really have to work for it and be creative to come up with great tones. Now way too many bands just use the same Axe FX or Kemper patches and everything sounds so homogeneous and sterile.

Top
 Profile  
TragedyMask
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Wed May 27, 2020 3:47 pm
Posts: 22
Location: United States
PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2020 9:08 am 
 

To me, the whole spirit of metal is embodied in emotional expression and anti-conformity. If you limit yourself to 2 or 3 hyper-specific and obscure sub-genres in order to chase clout with the internet people as someone with a “refined palette for extreme music,” you are more of a conformist than the people who listen to whatever they enjoy regardless of genre, and I highly doubt you hold as much of an emotional connection to the music you listen to.

I enjoy a perfectly cooked steak au poivre from a 4-star restaurant, but that isn’t to say I didn’t proudly enjoy a Big Mac for lunch on the same day. I grew up as a fat American kid who ate a lot of happy meals, so McDonalds is good comfort food for me. Formative albums and genres are the same way. So why can’t I enjoy Wintersun and old Linkin Park in the same playlist?

Sadus is a great example. In 2006 they released Out for Blood and everybody shit all over it because it had such prominent Nu Metal influences. But if you take a step back, they did some pretty cool, objectively interesting things on that album. The only relative part is whether or not you enjoyed it, which is your prerogative as the listener.

Personally, I think Machine Head’s 2014 “Bloodstone & Diamonds” album surpasses both Burn My Eyes and The Blackening. I like Slipknot’s albums after Iowa, and I think Vol. 3 surpasses their S/T. And hell, I even enjoy some deathcore and post-hardcore from time to time. Spite, Loathe, Infant Annihilator—all terrific bands. On the same token, I enjoy a wide range of more obscure bands as well. Cloud Rat’s “Pollinator” is one of the best albums of the past decade. Most often, more obscure bands will be more experimental and will lay everything out on the table since their current album or EP may be their only shot at making a name for themselves.

That felt good.

I yield my time.
_________________
Tragedy Mask (https://www.metal-archives.com/bands/Tr ... 3540468578)

New album, Theatrum Tragoedia, available now on all streaming platforms!

Bandcamp: https://tragedymask.bandcamp.com

Top
 Profile  
Annable Courts
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Oct 26, 2013 2:25 pm
Posts: 61
Location: Cheese
PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2020 3:45 pm 
 

LithoJazzoSphere wrote:
Annable Courts wrote:
I'm talking about the sound and production methods of that particular period vs their predecessors from the 90s. The reason I'm not mentioning, say, death metal from that period is because it wasn't produced that way and didn't have that sound. I'm a huge fan of the very notion of transforming your instruments so they sound more digital than organic. Always been a fan of electronic drums on metal, and it can be done super tastefully and not sound mainstream at all btw try any "Epitome" track from Blut Aus Nord or simply Godflesh. Linkin Park had that really cool sampled drum thing going for them on the first record. Never been a fan of the actual songs but NIN had some fantastic sounding music, because the instruments were so processed and transformed, like the NIN guitar sound is nothing like just micing up your guitar cab straight out of the room. Soilwork's 'Natural Born Chaos' isn't regarded as commercial/mall-metal and it sounds super neat and is very tightly compressed, doesn't sound organic at all and is at war in that sense with anything 90s or even more so 80s.


When it comes to drums my preference is for electronic and acoustic drums to sound different, and this contrast can give variety and differentiation to sections that incorporate one versus the other. I'm not particularly fond of acoustic drums that sound overly triggered and quantized, though I've had to get quite used to them because they're unavoidable. Good natural sounding acoustic drums when possible, and then add whatever craziness you want with manipulating electronic ones.

The NIN guitar sound like on "Big Man With a Gun" is something I've really been fascinated by. I've heard versions of it used by Marilyn Manson, Front Line Assembly and others, and it has this really abrasive, direct sound to it, like it's a guitar plugged straight into a specific kind of distortion pedal and then right into the mixing board. It sounds horrible in most other genres that try to use it, but somehow just works perfectly for that sort of industrial rock/metal vibe.

I think A Predator's Portrait has an even bigger guitar sound than NBC, but they're of a similar cloth. I attribute it to the production methods Frederik Nordstrom had developed in Studio Fredman by that point, as you can hear variations of it on many other albums around that time by In Flames, Old Man's Child, Dark Tranquillity, Dimmu Borgir and others. It's the layered multi-tracking with multiple amps, panning the tracks, his unique method of micing cabs, and whatever secret sauce he applies in further processing.

There are a few other producers who managed to capture similar sounds at times. One of the earliest tones I remember being blown away by was on Demanufacture. When you can just hold a power chord and listen to the sound oscillate and be floored, you know you've really found something. It seems like back then they really have to work for it and be creative to come up with great tones. Now way too many bands just use the same Axe FX or Kemper patches and everything sounds so homogeneous and sterile.


About the last paragraph. Quick note first: I know exactly what you're saying about Demanufacture and just listening to a mere suspended power chord, and I'm sure you're referring more specifically to the intro to Zero Signal. What a power chord.

More generally, I think contemporary metal bands are more obsessed about just sounding huge and overproduced, and not so much what they play. Back in the day, a band like FF since we brought them up were worried about tone for sure but also song-writing. So it wasn't like the Djent scene where it's basically just the generic sound that ppl are after, like the pure guitar tone in and of itself; the tone was there to better serve the song. Demanufacture musically and creatively is far, far more than a guitar tone.

HviteGuden wrote:
Annable Courts wrote:
Always been a fan of electronic drums on metal, and it can be done super tastefully and not sound mainstream at all btw try any "Epitome" track from Blut Aus Nord or simply Godflesh.

I'd say, in metal in general electronic drums gotta be programmed so that they sound not plastic and not synthetical. Like on Deathspell Omega albums, for example. Godflesh and Blut Aus Nord both have exactly the synthetical sound of drum-machine, but in their cases it's an advantage, because they play industrial metal and industrial black metal respectively.


Here's an example I love.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dBlQ3nG3MA

LoG are by no means industrial by any stretch, but the drums in that outro have such a glorious industrial touch to them. Ashes of the Wake (2004) as a whole doesn't fit the description of this thread, it's rather organic modern thrash, but just that outro really has that vibe to it. Snare and Overheads sound regular, but those kicks and toms. So industrial.

Top
 Profile  
LithoJazzoSphere
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2020 8:11 pm
Posts: 797
Location: United States
PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2020 4:22 pm 
 

Annable Courts wrote:
About the last paragraph. Quick note first: I know exactly what you're saying about Demanufacture and just listening to a mere suspended power chord, and I'm sure you're referring more specifically to the intro to Zero Signal. What a power chord.


Yep, that's the one. I don't know if you feel the same way, though you did mention them in the OP, but Machine Head's The Blackening gives me similar sensations in the riffing and tone, though they don't have anything quite as long and distinctive as "Zero Signal". Not quite as good, but in the same ballpark and better than their other albums and the vast majority of other bands.

Top
 Profile  
Korpgud
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2013 7:09 pm
Posts: 100
Location: Sweden
PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2020 5:15 am 
 

Vadara wrote:
The wildest thing about nu-metal is that it'll have these surprisingly heavy guitars but the vocals will exclusively be this absolutely abominable style of singing that is truly the worst thing in existence. At least the most fangless metalcore has harsh vocals. Nu-metal vocals are either terrible singing or this insufferable pseudo harsh vocals that are still clear enough to not scare any normies away that also sound like shit lmao (thanks Pantera)

Also nu-metal always sounds painfully fake to me. Like they're feigning emotion, but there's no artistry or heart behind it, which is why I can unironically love stand whiny ass emo bitch boy -core but absolutely hate nu-metal. It's just pathetic fakeness. One of the most insincere genres of music ever behind grunge. At least hair metal was goofy.

Can nu-metal claim one album that is actually unironically good? I really can't think of any one album. It might seriously be the only genre of music devoid of any quality albums whatsoever.


Nu metal was a gateway for me, back in my teens. I quickly moved on to way heavier stuff, but I still unironically love the same bands I was into back then. At least the ones I considered my favourites, like KoRn, Limp Bizkit, early Linkin Park and Slipknot.

I understand all of your points and I 100% they apply to MOST nu metal bands. There was a video on youtube that argued that the fake edginess and emotion was part of the reason that nu metal died, and I think that makes sense. But I also believe that a select few bands were completely genuine with their emotions. Jonathan Davis of KoRn had his fair share of childhood trauma, and it's obvious that he's not faking anything (but I will agree that most of his lyrics are reaaaaally corny, no pun intended).

I can list albums that, to me, still sound great, but they still might not do anything for you. KoRns early albums for instance. They always had this creepy atmosphere. If we're talking Limp Bizkit, they had some great musicianship and some serious groove (I'm talking real groove, more like hip hop than all of that groove metal shit). They also had some killer melodic songs when they dialed it back. The biggest problem with LB really was/is Fred Durst.

Now, as a counterpoint, I listened to one of Disturbs albums recently (the one that has down with the sickness on it), and I hated every second of it. Cringeworthy lyrics, singing, "groovy" riffs etc. It really took the cake in terms of shittyness. If stuff like this is all you've heard, then no wonder you don't like it. On the other hand, people just have different tastes and maybe you'll find KoRn just as bad, who knows.
_________________
SWÆRMM - grindcore / HC / death metal
Botgörelsen - black metal

Top
 Profile  
HviteGuden
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 15, 2019 11:24 am
Posts: 175
Location: Russia
PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2020 6:34 am 
 

Korpgud wrote:
I understand all of your points and I 100% they apply to MOST nu metal bands. There was a video on youtube that argued that the fake edginess and emotion was part of the reason that nu metal died, and I think that makes sense. But I also believe that a select few bands were completely genuine with their emotions. Jonathan Davis of KoRn had his fair share of childhood trauma, and it's obvious that he's not faking anything (but I will agree that most of his lyrics are reaaaaally corny, no pun intended).

I can list albums that, to me, still sound great, but they still might not do anything for you. KoRns early albums for instance. They always had this creepy atmosphere. If we're talking Limp Bizkit, they had some great musicianship and some serious groove (I'm talking real groove, more like hip hop than all of that groove metal shit). They also had some killer melodic songs when they dialed it back. The biggest problem with LB really was/is Fred Durst.

I agree, that nu metal mostly sounds fake in terms of an emotional approach. For me Slipknot is a one of the most obvious examples with this disadvantage. They sounded like a sort of extreme metal wannabe band, not truly harsh like extreme metal, but harsher than common popular metal of their time. That's why they were and remain so popular and an enrty level band.

While I also agree on Korn, their dubut album indeed sounded sincere, truly dark and depressive. The hip-hop influences were majorly in the rhythm, there weren't much of them. Basically, it was a catchy groove metal with a funky and hip-hop influenced rhythm, with versatile vocals, which could be both depressive and harsh. That's the best album of nu metal and a one of a few really good works.

Also, Deftones were pretty good with both their early sound, which was nu metal, and the later one, which is more of alternative metal with shoegaze influences.

Top
 Profile  
we hope you die
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2011 9:01 am
Posts: 81
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2020 11:59 am 
 

Reading this thread it's interesting to see how age affects your opinion of nu/alt metal more than other genres would. If you were already into metal in 2000, you're more likely to have despised nu metal at the time, and despise it now. Whereas i would be willing to bet that anyone around my age (Late 20s early 30s), who was a teenager in the early 2000s, your gateway into more extreme genres of metal started with nu metal. I would not have come across Emperor if I had never bought Hybrid Theory. So regardless of what I think of Linkin Park as a more mature music fan, I can't deny their importance to me.

Whatever you think of the music, i reckon it's impact on underground metal from the late 2000s to the present is hard to gauge. The influx of young fans as a result of the nu metal boom, who went on to become the new generation of extreme metal artists, on a scale not seen before within underground metal. It may have also had an impact on the diverse styles and approaches to extreme music, the breakdown of traditional genre barriers etc. (I'll leave it to you whether you think that's a good thing).

Did other genres with a similar standing as nu metal have the same impact in terms of being a gateway for young people? Did glam for instance? I always hear older fans say that they started out with Judas Priest and Iron Maiden and then got into Slayer. Never that they started out Motley Crue.
_________________
https://hatemeditations.wordpress.com/

Top
 Profile  
LithoJazzoSphere
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2020 8:11 pm
Posts: 797
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2020 12:23 pm 
 

Yeah, that's a curious thing, I don't nearly as often hear about people who were into Soundgarden and Alice In Chains and then got into harder metal either. On the reverse side, I have seen a lot of people who started with Killswitch Engage and got into more extreme metal, as they're one of first ones to start blowing up after I was already entrenched into metal.

Top
 Profile  
Twisted_Psychology
Metal freak

Joined: Sat May 16, 2009 8:22 pm
Posts: 5047
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2020 2:29 pm 
 

we hope you die wrote:
Did other genres with a similar standing as nu metal have the same impact in terms of being a gateway for young people? Did glam for instance? I always hear older fans say that they started out with Judas Priest and Iron Maiden and then got into Slayer. Never that they started out Motley Crue.


More a specific band than a genre, but KISS was definitely a gateway for a lot of the old guard. I swear every dude over the age of forty has an "I heard Alive! when I was eight and it changed my life" story.
_________________
Spirit Division (Stoner/Doom): http://spiritdivision.bandcamp.com
My solo acoustic project (Dark Folk/Blues): http://christophersteve.bandcamp.com/
Lavaborne (Heavy/Power/Doom): https://lavaborne.bandcamp.com

Top
 Profile  
Annable Courts
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Oct 26, 2013 2:25 pm
Posts: 61
Location: Cheese
PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2020 5:17 pm 
 

we hope you die wrote:
Reading this thread it's interesting to see how age affects your opinion of nu/alt metal more than other genres would. If you were already into metal in 2000, you're more likely to have despised nu metal at the time, and despise it now. Whereas i would be willing to bet that anyone around my age (Late 20s early 30s), who was a teenager in the early 2000s, your gateway into more extreme genres of metal started with nu metal. I would not have come across Emperor if I had never bought Hybrid Theory. So regardless of what I think of Linkin Park as a more mature music fan, I can't deny their importance to me.

Whatever you think of the music, i reckon it's impact on underground metal from the late 2000s to the present is hard to gauge. The influx of young fans as a result of the nu metal boom, who went on to become the new generation of extreme metal artists, on a scale not seen before within underground metal. It may have also had an impact on the diverse styles and approaches to extreme music, the breakdown of traditional genre barriers etc. (I'll leave it to you whether you think that's a good thing).

Did other genres with a similar standing as nu metal have the same impact in terms of being a gateway for young people? Did glam for instance? I always hear older fans say that they started out with Judas Priest and Iron Maiden and then got into Slayer. Never that they started out Motley Crue.

My answer to the nu metal was just a gateway to the real shit argument is, if it was just a gateway and nothing but a gateway then it wouldn't have attracted us in the first place. It means there was something to it that we genuinely were drawn to. For e.g., and many would disagree with this, but with my own taste for the extreme as soon as I managed to enjoy death metal fully for what it was I basically dropped thrash, bar 3 or 4 classics, because I no longer needed it; thrash was simply in my mind a necessary step for the creation of death metal, and death metal was just a better version of thrash: faster, more extreme, thicker, more powerful, more primordial, deeper etc. And I'm not saying nu metal is better than thrash, but "nu metal" (that very broad term) actually had its own thing going as totally distinct from every other genre around it. Like you wouldn't find a more extreme version of Linkin Park's Hybrid Theory anywhere in your next step as a listener, you wouldn't find a more extreme version of KoRn or a "better" version of Static X, or Fear Factory. Those were, in that sense, not just gateway bands. They were an achieved style that you either dug, or didn't. For most of these bands, it was just a matter of style, and feel. Static X is ridiculously simple and minimalistic if you just look at the tabs on paper, but the arrangements, the tones... the vibe. And there's nothing, or not much, out there that sounds quite like their first two records, as shitty musically as they are lol.

Top
 Profile  
Korpgud
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2013 7:09 pm
Posts: 100
Location: Sweden
PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2020 5:32 pm 
 

Annable Courts wrote:
nu metal was just a gateway to the real shit argument is, if it was just a gateway and nothing but a gateway then it wouldn't have attracted us in the first place. It means there was something to it that we genuinely were drawn to. For e.g., and many would disagree with this, but with my own taste for the extreme as soon as I managed to enjoy death metal fully for what it was I basically dropped thrash, bar 3 or 4 classics, because I no longer needed it; thrash was simply in my mind a necessary step for the creation of death metal, and death metal was just a better version of thrash: faster, more extreme, thicker, more powerful, more primordial, deeper etc. And I'm not saying nu metal is better than thrash, but "nu metal" (that very broad term) actually had its own thing going as totally distinct from every other genre around it. Like you wouldn't find a more extreme version of Linkin Park's Hybrid Theory anywhere in your next step as a listener, you wouldn't find a more extreme version of KoRn or a "better" version of Static X, or Fear Factory. Those were, in that sense, not just gateway bands. They were an achieved style that you either dug, or didn't. For most of these bands, it was just a matter of style, and feel. Static X is ridiculously simple and minimalistic if you just look at the tabs on paper, but the arrangements, the tones... the vibe. And there's nothing, or not much, out there that sounds quite like their first two records, as shitty musically as they are lol.


That's an interesting take. I can't think of a "successor" to nu metal either, at least not in the same way that death metal is/was to thrash. I mean, when emo/ screamo and metalcore became big things, those genres pretty much took over a lot of the same areas that had previously been covered by nu metal. Lots of emotion and melody, kinda cheesy - perfect for teenagers. But they weren't really extensions of the nu metal sound either. I never got into either of those genres.
_________________
SWÆRMM - grindcore / HC / death metal
Botgörelsen - black metal

Top
 Profile  
LithoJazzoSphere
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2020 8:11 pm
Posts: 797
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2020 5:36 pm 
 

Annable Courts wrote:
Like you wouldn't find a more extreme version of Linkin Park's Hybrid Theory anywhere in your next step as a listener, you wouldn't find a more extreme version of KoRn or a "better" version of Static X, or Fear Factory.


Eh, maybe not exactly, but you could see Threat Signal as an extreme version of Linkin Park, 00s In Flames for KoRn, Sybreed for Static-X, and Strapping Young Lad for Fear Factory.

Top
 Profile  
Immortal666
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2003 6:32 am
Posts: 758
Location: Philippines
PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2020 8:00 pm 
 

I listened to nu metal as it was starting back in the day but abandoned it after I got into black metal and the more underground metal stuff. Recently though, I found a renewed interest in some of nu metal bands that I used to listen to like Static-X and bands I used to avoid like Marilyn Manson. But there are still some bands I won't listen to 'coz I know they're junk, watered down crap - Linkin Park comes to mind.

Top
 Profile  
MetalHearted
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Jun 09, 2008 2:48 pm
Posts: 728
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2020 10:32 pm 
 

Like most people my age (27) i definitely got into metal through nu metal, so it’s pretty nostalgic. Agree that Korn and System of a Down had some legitimately good albums. Am I the only one that still thinks Mudvayne’s Ld50 was actually pretty good? The rest aged pretty badly but I have a soft spot for that album.
_________________
MetalGummi wrote:
2nd wave black metal was the white mans answer to gangster rap

Top
 Profile  
Vadara
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2016 11:14 pm
Posts: 225
Location: United States
PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2020 1:17 am 
 

Korpgud wrote:
That's an interesting take. I can't think of a "successor" to nu metal either, at least not in the same way that death metal is/was to thrash. I mean, when emo/ screamo and metalcore became big things, those genres pretty much took over a lot of the same areas that had previously been covered by nu metal. Lots of emotion and melody, kinda cheesy - perfect for teenagers. But they weren't really extensions of the nu metal sound either. I never got into either of those genres.


In my eyes -core and nu-metal weren't really similar at all. The former was way less popular than the latter (seriously, I have no idea where metalheads get the idea that metalcore and later deathcore were popular, they basically never appeared in pop culture and I never see random people shoutout even the hugest bands at their heights of popularity like I've seen random-ass people just talk about how sick Slipknot and Linkin Park were back in the day) and more of an actual defined thing whereas we still can't figure out what on earth nu-metal actually was.

Some newer -core bands have nu-metal influence, but we're talking very new, like all those nu-metal kids grew up and got into -core and brought that to their bands and we're jut seeing that (and I hope they stop because this shit is terrible). Not like the two intersected in the early 2000's, in fact they basically drifted as far apart from each other as possible instantly.

The truth of the matter is that nu-metal was a pop music fad: its fans just moved on to other pop music genres when it died, rather than continue any kind of scene. I struggle to think that any nu-metal scene existed or did exist, really. Like modern pop music, people just listened to it and then moved on, much in the same way the cheesy EDM that followed it was another shallow pop trend. It has no successor because by definition it can't; it's fans were unloyal normies who just moved on. I think this is really telling when you look at subreddit subscriber counts:

/r/metal: 1,065,817 users
/r/metalcore: 108,193 users
/r/deathcore: 35,254 users
/r/numetal: 7,832 users

Oof. There are subreddits for metal subgenres that have literally triple the subscribers to /r/numetal (/r/blackmetal has 44,000 or so for instance). Ouch. This really puts it into perspective.

Top
 Profile  
we hope you die
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2011 9:01 am
Posts: 81
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2020 4:27 am 
 

Speaking on the whole 'gateway' argument, I think the age you were when nu metal got big is more important that the any similarities it had to other forms of metal. After whatever pop music played on the radio and what your parents were into, if nu metal was the first alternative music you heard, then it was the shit. Before you knew or cared about the difference between Slayer and Suffocation, nu metal (or millennium metal if we're being more broad) just opened up young listeners to heavy music that they hadn't heard before.

It was only later once I became acclimatised to heavy music and started getting into death metal etc. that I started looking into the history of the genres and who influenced who etc.
_________________
https://hatemeditations.wordpress.com/

Top
 Profile  
Korpgud
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2013 7:09 pm
Posts: 100
Location: Sweden
PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2020 5:49 am 
 

Vadara wrote:
Korpgud wrote:
That's an interesting take. I can't think of a "successor" to nu metal either, at least not in the same way that death metal is/was to thrash. I mean, when emo/ screamo and metalcore became big things, those genres pretty much took over a lot of the same areas that had previously been covered by nu metal. Lots of emotion and melody, kinda cheesy - perfect for teenagers. But they weren't really extensions of the nu metal sound either. I never got into either of those genres.




The truth of the matter is that nu-metal was a pop music fad: its fans just moved on to other pop music genres when it died, rather than continue any kind of scene. I struggle to think that any nu-metal scene existed or did exist, really. Like modern pop music, people just listened to it and then moved on, much in the same way the cheesy EDM that followed it was another shallow pop trend. It has no successor because by definition it can't; it's fans were unloyal normies who just moved on.


I think you missed the part where numerous people in this thread alone stated that nu metal was the gateway into heavier metal. Not only is your statement a simple generalisation, it is also visibly incorrect. At least in my experience. I'm sure some nu metal fans back in the day moved on to poppier stuff, or the "next trend". But then again, I have also met people who used to love Slayer, Metallica, or even death metal back in their teens, who then completely abandoned all of that and moved on to other genres. This is all anecdotal of course, but I'm sure I'm not alone in this.

Vadara wrote:

I think this is really telling when you look at subreddit subscriber counts:

/r/metal: 1,065,817 users
/r/metalcore: 108,193 users
/r/deathcore: 35,254 users
/r/numetal: 7,832 users

Oof. There are subreddits for metal subgenres that have literally triple the subscribers to /r/numetal (/r/blackmetal has 44,000 or so for instance). Ouch. This really puts it into perspective.


I'm not surprised at all. Even though I still love some nu metal, I would never subscribe to a subreddit or join a forum to discuss it. The genre is dead and there probably won't be anything interesting coming out of it soon.
_________________
SWÆRMM - grindcore / HC / death metal
Botgörelsen - black metal

Top
 Profile  
last_eulogy
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2003 4:17 pm
Posts: 149
PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2020 6:17 am 
 

Immortal666 wrote:
I listened to nu metal as it was starting back in the day but abandoned it after I got into black metal and the more underground metal stuff. Recently though, I found a renewed interest in some of nu metal bands that I used to listen to like Static-X and bands I used to avoid like Marilyn Manson. But there are still some bands I won't listen to 'coz I know they're junk, watered down crap - Linkin Park comes to mind.
Portrait of an American Family is in my top 10 of all time favorite albums. I believe it has a different sound than later albums. That's partly due to the unique playing style of Daisy Berkowitz. Who quit due to Mansons heavy drug use and rock star attitude. I really don't like anything after Portrait, besides the occasional song like Angel With Scabbed Wings. They also have dozens of demos, prior to Portrait. Songs that never made it to an album. Can't believe Magic 8 Ball never made to an album. Song is one of my favorite songs that the band ever created.
_________________
Dr Culty's Horror Movie Collection

Top
 Profile  
Lord_Jotun
Veteran

Joined: Sat Sep 13, 2003 5:02 pm
Posts: 2617
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2020 5:39 pm 
 

You should be able to enjoy Tourniquet and Wormboy from Antichrist Superstar; Putesky had a hand in writing them and his playing features prominently (White's songs on the album feature more straight power chords). Can't believe the Spooky Kids demos haven't been properly reissues yet myself.

I also found this a couple of weeks ago, enjoy:
_________________
Bands I'm in:
Phenris
In Corpore Mortis
Orgiastic Pleasures
Rust
Black Druid Hymns - my projects on YouTube

Top
 Profile  
Vadara
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2016 11:14 pm
Posts: 225
Location: United States
PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2020 1:37 am 
 

Korpgud wrote:

I think you missed the part where numerous people in this thread alone stated that nu metal was the gateway into heavier metal. Not only is your statement a simple generalisation, it is also visibly incorrect. At least in my experience. I'm sure some nu metal fans back in the day moved on to poppier stuff, or the "next trend". But then again, I have also met people who used to love Slayer, Metallica, or even death metal back in their teens, who then completely abandoned all of that and moved on to other genres. This is all anecdotal of course, but I'm sure I'm not alone in this.



That kind of proves my point: nu-metal fans either became fans of adjacent genres like metal proper or they moved on to other pop music. They didn't keep listening to new nu-metal or even starting their own bands--I mean, some did, obviously, nu-metal bands still exist, but you can find bands of literally any genre out there. Nu-metal never grew a self-sustaining scene is my point. It existed only as a minor fad or starting point for entering another scene. The fact that nu-metal basically consisted of, like, 10 super popular bands like Linkin Park and then an absolute wasteland proves my point too. No one got deep into this music. There are no hidden nu-metal gems. There was just the popular bands that got the marketing to make them a thing and then absolutely nothing. Compare this to metal proper where it seems like most metalheads all have their own personal hidden gem and dig deep enough to know all these obscure bands (relative to other metal bands).

Top
 Profile  
Annable Courts
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Oct 26, 2013 2:25 pm
Posts: 61
Location: Cheese
PostPosted: Sat Jul 04, 2020 2:29 pm 
 

LithoJazzoSphere wrote:
Annable Courts wrote:
Like you wouldn't find a more extreme version of Linkin Park's Hybrid Theory anywhere in your next step as a listener, you wouldn't find a more extreme version of KoRn or a "better" version of Static X, or Fear Factory.


Eh, maybe not exactly, but you could see Threat Signal as an extreme version of Linkin Park, 00s In Flames for KoRn, Sybreed for Static-X, and Strapping Young Lad for Fear Factory.

I suppose yes, those are fair statements. I guess I meant those bands and records had achieved a sound, they'd put together multiple influences and achieved a finished sound. It wasn't experimental, foundational work for the real stuff to come in later bands like I would say bands like Venom or Possessed were for extreme metal. Like the greatest death metal bands are Morbid Angel, Cannibal Corpse etc... not the archaic forms of 80s extreme thrash. With nu-metal, you either really dig the atmosphere and musical concept of Hybrid Theory, or you think it's commercial trash or whatever. You basically either think KoRn is one of the coolest sounds you've ever heard or it's just mainstream pop-metal garbage, but those nu-metal bands had really found a coherent sound, that was so starkly different to everything around them. All of those bands you quoted in your post (the original ones, LP, KoRn, St-X etc) were super original and brought their own distinct flavor. Couldn't be said of the following 'core' genre bands, where every band was really just a slight variation of the exact same sound.

Top
 Profile  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot], Spiner202, TadGhostal, therealvivs, Twisted_Psychology, Xytras71 and 21 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

  Print view
Jump to:  

Back to the Encyclopaedia Metallum


Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group