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Eradicatedseraphim
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Joined: Thu May 24, 2012 5:42 am
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Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Sep 15, 2020 6:22 pm 
 

What are some bands that while popular during their respective primes gained a new lease on life in the 2010 decade? Was it a critical revaluation of their peak material, or was it crossover appeal that gave their albums wide appeal to other music scenes. In particular I remember HC kids wearing Type O Negative/Obituary merch in the early 2010s, and the goth scene loves Type O in the same vein as NIN/Depeche. What are some bands or even musical styles that reappeared and still have an audience?
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true_death
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 15, 2020 6:31 pm 
 

Obituary for sure, in 2008-2009 I thought they were burnt out and done but after some lineup changes they've really turned it around, at this point I'd easy label them as one of the most relevant "legacy" death metal bands (obviously behind CC) - the last two albums were rock solid and they're one of the best live bands there is.
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Unorthodox
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 15, 2020 6:53 pm 
 

Too true, I saw Obituary live around like 2016 and was relatively surprised just how fun their live performance was, as well as their overall live sound.
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Waltz_of_Ghouls
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 15, 2020 8:32 pm 
 

Gonna have to go with Cradle of Filth, they've been back in good grace since they released Hammer of the Witches since 2015. The departure of Paul Allender from the band was a much needed move, because his songwriting was getting quite stale stale. The new guys injected vigor back in the band. Hammer was easily the best thing since Midian and Cryptoriana was worthy follow-up, proving that Hammer was not a fluke.

Old-time fans were lucky too, since the band released the original recording of Dusk and Her Embrace, as well as the remixed and remastered Cruelty and the Beast. The band brought back many juicy cuts from the 90's on their setlists and Dani's live vocals improved dramatically after the embarassing mid-00's.
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Frank Booth
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 15, 2020 8:49 pm 
 

Honestly, Job for a Cowboy. Their popularity PLUMMETED after 2010 once the deathcore kids realized that they were never going to go back to the Doom era, and by the time they stopped touring, they were pretty far down on bills and did not draw more than 150-200 tops as a headliner, usually less. Sun Eater was a slow burn, but I think that a mix of the tech scene jumping on that and kids who were too young to have been there for their original run discovering them helped build them up to the point where they are probably at least as big as they were between 2006 and 2009, if not bigger.

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Morn Of Solace
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Joined: Tue Apr 01, 2014 2:19 am
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 2:50 am 
 

Enslaved springs to mind. While their had plenty of admirers and cult status in the 90's the last decade albums put them on the map of a new wave of fans: i was really suprised to see how much talk there was about albums like Axioma and RIITIIR and in the live shows the number of people in the crowd increased a lot during those years

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Turner
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 4:32 am 
 

I guess Anvil? They were completely unknown from about 1984 until whenever that documentary came out, then all of a sudden they were everywhere. Thankfully everyone worked out that they were shit and forgot about them soon after, but they did enjoy a bit of a resurgence there.

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Gravetemplar
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 4:59 am 
 

Morn Of Solace wrote:
Enslaved springs to mind. While their had plenty of admirers and cult status in the 90's the last decade albums put them on the map of a new wave of fans: i was really suprised to see how much talk there was about albums like Axioma and RIITIIR and in the live shows the number of people in the crowd increased a lot during those years

Behemoth too. The Satanist catapulted from being "that band copying Nile" to being the most well known extreme metal band nowadays.

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InnesI
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 6:24 am 
 

Accept

They released Blood of the Nations in 2010 and it was generally praised. Stalingrad was also highly rated and I feel that this is one of the classic bands that showed new life in the 2010's.

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lordcatfish
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 6:35 am 
 

I feel like Kreator, having built up a lot of goodwill with their output from 2001 - 2009, have gone up a level or two since Phantom Antichrist. I do think the Nuclear Blast hype machine has helped a lot in that regard (probably the same for other bands too).
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Twisted_Psychology
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 8:20 am 
 

Manilla Road comes to mind, especially in the last five years or so.
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Dungeon_Vic
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 9:37 am 
 

Anvil's Forged in Fire is a magnificent album. Free as the Wind is a really dear song to me.

I'd say Overkill since Ironbound.
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Frank Booth
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 9:41 am 
 

I'm also surprised I forgot it, but Incantation. They're another beneficiary of what you could call the "Obituary effect" (and, by extent, the Cannibal Corpse effect): kids discovered them and they blew up. While Obituary had hardcore kids to thank, Incantation had kids who used them as a gateway to the underground because they comfortably straddle both the mainstream and the underground, and they're pretty accessible, all things considered. They're grimy, but not impenetrably so, and they've also got that kind of chunky groove that kids who like Cannibal, Obituary, and Morbid Angel can sink their teeth into. I've noticed whenever I've seen them that they draw a sizable younger audience (lots of X's visible), and the kids go absolutely apeshit for them, and John told me outright that he's noticed how young their typical audience is these days. I don't think it's a stretch to assume that they started touring again once they noticed how much bigger they had gotten over the course of the decade.

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Dungeon_Vic
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 10:51 am 
 

Looking at my signature: King Diamond I guess and Mercyful Fate. Reunions and concerts plus all the bands that suddenly showed up with some sort of influence (like In Solitude, Portrait, Attic, Ghost [...], Them etc), action figures, headlining fests and DVDs, seems this is the best time since the 80s for the KD/MF brand...
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megalowho
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 11:54 am 
 

I don't have any good metal examples. (I thought about The Ruins Of Beverast, but (a) I'm not sure they're that well-known outside of black metal, and (b) what I figured might (?) be their "breakthrough" album, Foulest, was released in '09. Probably not a good example.)

But mainly I wanted to mention, in the "metal-adjacent" category, Swans, who reunited in 2010 and released a number of surprisingly successful albums, and seemed to be touring everywhere (I think at least once at a metal festival) throughout much of the decade. A definitive band of the 2010s for me, and easily my favorite concert act, which I gather is how lots of people feel. (The new film at one point shows Gira meeting some long-time fans, who'd gotten into Swans pre-breakup, and were now introducing their teenaged kids to the band, and attending shows as families.)

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Gravetemplar
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 2:33 pm 
 

megalowho wrote:
I don't have any good metal examples. (I thought about The Ruins Of Beverast, but (a) I'm not sure they're that well-known outside of black metal, and (b) what I figured might (?) be their "breakthrough" album, Foulest, was released in '09. Probably not a good example.)

But mainly I wanted to mention, in the "metal-adjacent" category, Swans, who reunited in 2010 and released a number of surprisingly successful albums, and seemed to be touring everywhere (I think at least once at a metal festival) throughout much of the decade. A definitive band of the 2010s for me, and easily my favorite concert act, which I gather is how lots of people feel. (The new film at one point shows Gira meeting some long-time fans, who'd gotten into Swans pre-breakup, and were now introducing their teenaged kids to the band, and attending shows as families.)

Yes, Swans were probably the best live album of the past decade. So glad the got the recognition they deserved.

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newp
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 3:09 pm 
 

Gravetemplar wrote:
Behemoth too. The Satanist catapulted from being "that band copying Nile" to being the most well known extreme metal band nowadays.

Eh? The Satanist was a breath of fresh air for many long time fans like myself who found the previous album kinda stale, but they didn't have some big career dip. Haven't they been one of the most popular extreme bands since like, Demigod/the mid 00s or so?

Also I don't think I've heard them described as just "that band copying Nile" before, but there are some riffing similarities on the fast stuff and they did have Karl Sanders guest solo on a track, so close enough I guess :lol:

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Gravetemplar
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 3:28 pm 
 

newp wrote:
Gravetemplar wrote:
Behemoth too. The Satanist catapulted from being "that band copying Nile" to being the most well known extreme metal band nowadays.

Eh? The Satanist was a breath of fresh air for many long time fans like myself who found the previous album kinda stale, but they didn't have some big career dip. Haven't they been one of the most popular extreme bands since like, Demigod/the mid 00s or so?

Also I don't think I've heard them described as just "that band copying Nile" before, but there are some riffing similarities on the fast stuff and they did have Karl Sanders guest solo on a track, so close enough I guess :lol:

They weren't nearly as popular in the 00s as they were once The Satanist was out. The reason is simple: that brand of "brutal" death metal they were playing with Demigod wasn't as marketable as black metal. Evangelion was a disappointment to many so things weren't looking good. They changed styles just in time to ride the black metal trend and became a lot bigger than they were in the process. Don't get me wrong, I think The Satanist is their best album.

That one about Nile isn't mine, I've read it a few times and it makes a lot of sense. Nergal has always known were to look for inspiration.

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true_death
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 3:44 pm 
 

As huge as The Satanist was, part of me wonders if it was a fluke...the most recent album seemed like a blip on the radar in comparison, I never saw anyone really talk about it beyond making fun of the ridiculous titles - and it seems to have mostly garnered middling reviews. Personally, I can't remember for sure if I even listened to it let alone what it sounded like.
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Razakel
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 3:52 pm 
 

Seconding Enslaved and Behemoth as obvious examples.

Amorphis is also a big one. By the early 2000s they had essentially fallen off the face of the earth and then bam - out goes Pasi Koskinen, in comes Tomi Joutsen. Eclipse was a major comeback album, then Silent Waters and Skyforger only catapulted them further. Now they're probably bigger than they've ever been.

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praey
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 4:37 pm 
 

Seconding Incantation. In addition to the sonic reasons mentioned above, I think a contributing factor is how cleanly produced their most recent albums have been. That definitely lowers the barriers to entry, especially compared to other albums of the "cavernous death metal" variety. Something else that may have played a part in their resurgence (or at least helped it out) is that their merch designs are pretty damn cool. People like wearing cool shirts and that definitely helps a band gain more visibility.

Also have to agree with Behemoth. I saw them a couple years ago in a pretty big venue (it was that tour they did with At the Gates and WitTR) and it seemed like the majority of the crowd was FAR more familiar with their post-Evangelion material. People went apeshit over "Blow Your Trumpets Gabriel" while not reacting much at all to "Decade ov Therion." I got the impression a sizable portion of the crowd had just gotten into the band in recent years, and while they were big in the 2000s, I would definitely agree they were way bigger in the 2010s.

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Frank Booth
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 4:48 pm 
 

Incantation has never really been particularly dirty production-wise, honestly. Gritty, yes, but nothing significantly more dirty or cavernous than most of the other bigger death metal acts from that era. I think that helped them back around the end of the 2000s (which is when I recall them starting to build up a following among younger fans), and it's definitely helping draw them in now.

And yeah, that is definitely true for Behemoth as well, though I'd say that the initial "push" came from the deathcore scene getting into them and a lot of those bands (e.g. Whitechapel, Thy Art Is Murder, Carnifex, Oceano, etc.) being openly and obviously influenced by them. I was in high school back in the late 2000s and most of the core kids loved them even then.

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Unorthodox
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 5:01 pm 
 

Frank Booth wrote:
And yeah, that is definitely true for Behemoth as well, though I'd say that the initial "push" came from the deathcore scene getting into them and a lot of those bands (e.g. Whitechapel, Thy Art Is Murder, Carnifex, Oceano, etc.) being openly and obviously influenced by them. I was in high school back in the late 2000s and most of the core kids loved them even then.


Yeah I basically see it like this. It felt like Demigod-Evangelion was the period they really blew up, then Nergal came down with leukemia and everything was put on hold. After that, their comeback was tremendous in terms of how many people gravitated right back to liking the band, even though they were now pretty different in both style and sound. I don't know if they've exponentially gotten even bigger since The Satanist, or if it's just a linear progression that they were basically on course for since the 00's. Nevertheless, Knotfest isn't exactly something you'd expect a black/death metal band to be on, at least not usually.

praey wrote:
Also have to agree with Behemoth. I saw them a couple years ago in a pretty big venue (it was that tour they did with At the Gates and WitTR) and it seemed like the majority of the crowd was FAR more familiar with their post-Evangelion material. People went apeshit over "Blow Your Trumpets Gabriel" while not reacting much at all to "Decade ov Therion." I got the impression a sizable portion of the crowd had just gotten into the band in recent years, and while they were big in the 2000s, I would definitely agree they were way bigger in the 2010s.


Yeah that's not too surprising, albeit kinda a bummer as Decade ov Therion is an amazing song (as well as all of Satanica). I went to that show too, I think it was just after they released their ILYAYD album. Honestly, it didn't really seem like anyone was into the tracks on that album, but were massively into The Satanist/The Apostasy/Demigod/etc. And yeah, since Decade ov Therion came in the middle I think everyone was sort of using it as a breather track and we all just moshed our asses off for Conquer All :lol:
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Required Fields
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 10:01 pm 
 

praey wrote:
Seconding Incantation. In addition to the sonic reasons mentioned above, I think a contributing factor is how cleanly produced their most recent albums have been. That definitely lowers the barriers to entry, especially compared to other albums of the "cavernous death metal" variety. Something else that may have played a part in their resurgence (or at least helped it out) is that their merch designs are pretty damn cool. People like wearing cool shirts and that definitely helps a band gain more visibility.

Also have to agree with Behemoth. I saw them a couple years ago in a pretty big venue (it was that tour they did with At the Gates and WitTR) and it seemed like the majority of the crowd was FAR more familiar with their post-Evangelion material. People went apeshit over "Blow Your Trumpets Gabriel" while not reacting much at all to "Decade ov Therion." I got the impression a sizable portion of the crowd had just gotten into the band in recent years, and while they were big in the 2000s, I would definitely agree they were way bigger in the 2010s.


Another factor could be the gigantic list of Incantation worship bands that have come out in the 2010s. It seems like every third new death metal band in recent years seems to be Incantation worship. I think upon reading the comparisons, some people who haven't heard Incantation before looked more into them due to so many recent death metal bands having the same sound.
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BastardHead
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 10:20 pm 
 

Unorthodox wrote:
Frank Booth wrote:
And yeah, that is definitely true for Behemoth as well, though I'd say that the initial "push" came from the deathcore scene getting into them and a lot of those bands (e.g. Whitechapel, Thy Art Is Murder, Carnifex, Oceano, etc.) being openly and obviously influenced by them. I was in high school back in the late 2000s and most of the core kids loved them even then.


Yeah I basically see it like this. It felt like Demigod-Evangelion was the period they really blew up, then Nergal came down with leukemia and everything was put on hold. After that, their comeback was tremendous in terms of how many people gravitated right back to liking the band, even though they were now pretty different in both style and sound. I don't know if they've exponentially gotten even bigger since The Satanist, or if it's just a linear progression that they were basically on course for since the 00's. Nevertheless, Knotfest isn't exactly something you'd expect a black/death metal band to be on, at least not usually.


I also graduated high school in the late 2000s and my memory is that the deathcore crowd randomly loved Behemoth as well. The difference is that I remember Demigod being their big breakthrough already. They were already getting slots at Ozzfest in the 2000s and appealing to kids who generally didn't like extreme metal beyond whatever deathcore was trendy at the time. The Satanist pushed them even further but it really put them from "one of the biggest extreme metal bands in the mainstream besides Cannibal Corpse" to "right on Cannibal's level of noteworthiness".

Then again my high school also had a really bizarre trend where 80% of the stoners were huge Deicide fans so maybe I just grew up in a weird pocket of reality and have a warped view of things.
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e2128m
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 10:50 pm 
 

Not sure if my read is correct or not, but I want to say Marduk.

Never really heard them get much attention around here, but around the release of Serpent Sermon (2012) they did a bunch of touring and seemed to make a breakthrough of popularity into the "mainstream" metal crowd.

Also agree with Behemoth and Demigod. The hype around that album when it came out was huge. But of course that's what was coming out around the time I first heard Behemoth, so my experience would be different to someone who's first exposure is the release of something newer.

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newp
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2020 11:26 pm 
 

Huh, yeah aside from the break and uncertainty around Nergal's bout with leukemia I thought Behemoth's rise to popularity was fairly steady since the mid/late 00s, at least as being one of the more widely recognized extreme bands. But I'm not the most tuned in person so *shrug*

Also, if asked I would have guessed Frank Booth was some 50 year old scene guy who's been a roadie on a million tours over the years or maybe as a hired fill in, based on the stories and apparent connections. That you were in high school in the late 00s completely surprises me, but eh *larger shrug*

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InnesI
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2020 3:16 am 
 

e2128m wrote:
Also agree with Behemoth and Demigod. The hype around that album when it came out was huge. But of course that's what was coming out around the time I first heard Behemoth, so my experience would be different to someone who's first exposure is the release of something newer.


I also remember Demigod being huge in the metal community. It seemed like a breakthrough album for the band. Massive hype. I never got it at the time though. For me it was Evangelion that made me care about the band. But when The Satanist got released that's when the band became about as much mainstream as a black/death metal band could.

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Frank Booth
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2020 7:53 am 
 

Yeah, Demigod was around when they started getting a lot of hype online and in publications and got on some really big tours, then The Apostasy dropped and they started the cycle out on Ozzfest, did a coheadliner with Job for a Cowboy back when they were huge, were direct support for Dimmu Borgir, and so on and so forth. Demigod set things in motion, The Apostasy really got the ball rolling, and then by the time Evangelion hit, they had it made and that album mostly just sealed the deal (and seems to have been a grower; I remember it being polarizing back in the day, but the folks who didn't like The Satanist seem to like it a lot more nowadays than they did in 2009). Now, granted, they weren't stupidly big like they are now, but I'd say that by the time the turn of the decade rolled around back then, they were absolutely "quit your day job" big and probably had been for at least a couple years.

And hey, I talk to people, I hear stuff, and word travels. I could easily sling merch or something if I wanted to and was originally considering that as a career back in my younger days, but life and obligations got in the way and it's definitely for the better that I didn't, because it's a life that would have burned me out fast.

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GoatBoat
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2020 8:03 am 
 

Burzum for sure. It was already notorious beforehand, but the mid 2010s were the first time I saw it spread to people who weren't already fans of black metal. Pretty much every music community I've been to, regardless of how niche or mainstream it is, has a group of users who have listened to and liked Filosofem.

I never thought I'd see Burzum/Varg in-jokes spread out of the black metal fanbase either, but that happened too. I've even heard people say they don't like metal, except for Burzum. It's rather strange.

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Gravetemplar
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2020 8:28 am 
 

GoatBoat wrote:
Burzum for sure. It was already notorious beforehand, but the mid 2010s were the first time I saw it spread to people who weren't already fans of black metal. Pretty much every music community I've been to, regardless of how niche or mainstream it is, has a group of users who have listened to and liked Filosofem.

I never thought I'd see Burzum/Varg in-jokes spread out of the black metal fanbase either, but that happened too. I've even heard people say they don't like metal, except for Burzum. It's rather strange.

I'm not sure about this one. Everything he's released post prison has been heavily criticised by pretty much old and new fans. I feel it's one of this examples where his shitty ideology and dumb Youtuber videos generate way more interest than his actual music. Is he more well known? Sure, but I feel like it's more of an internet meme/joke nowadays. I honestly haven't seen anyone not into metal saying his music is the only metal they listen to. People not into metal tend to listen to Alcest and/or Deafheaven, not Burzum.

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Morn Of Solace
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2020 9:04 am 
 

^
I was surprised to see my two absolutely not metalhead friends sharing his tweet that said that Salvini looked like a middle eastener and mocking his video on how to find girls, he has really turned into a meme :lol:

I'd say that the apex of his musical popularity was around Belus when seemingly everyone was waiting the post jail album and it has quickly lowered since, in particular after Fallen.
Those were also the last years of the DSBM craze where everyone worshiped Burzum, that could have been a factor

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Terri23
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2020 9:26 am 
 

Hell are the obvious band. Prior to 2011 only nwobhm aficionados had really come across them. Human Remains broke them to a whole new level they couldn't have possibly predicted. Their success directly lead to just about every other nwobhm reformation of the decade.
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jimbies
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2020 9:31 am 
 

Turner wrote:
I guess Anvil? They were completely unknown from about 1984 until whenever that documentary came out, then all of a sudden they were everywhere. Thankfully everyone worked out that they were shit and forgot about them soon after, but they did enjoy a bit of a resurgence there.


Didn't they get an opening slot for AC/DC after that? I can't remember if that actually happened or not.

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TadGhostal
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2020 9:33 am 
 

jimbies wrote:
Turner wrote:
I guess Anvil? They were completely unknown from about 1984 until whenever that documentary came out, then all of a sudden they were everywhere. Thankfully everyone worked out that they were shit and forgot about them soon after, but they did enjoy a bit of a resurgence there.


Didn't they get an opening slot for AC/DC after that? I can't remember if that actually happened or not.


They did.

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InnesI
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2020 11:15 am 
 

Gravetemplar wrote:
I'm not sure about this one. Everything he's released post prison has been heavily criticised by pretty much old and new fans. I feel it's one of this examples where his shitty ideology and dumb Youtuber videos generate way more interest than his actual music. Is he more well known? Sure, but I feel like it's more of an internet meme/joke nowadays. I honestly haven't seen anyone not into metal saying his music is the only metal they listen to. People not into metal tend to listen to Alcest and/or Deafheaven, not Burzum.



You think? Both Belus and Fallen got their share of praise and was well liked in general. Everything past that though seem to mostly have gotten ok to bad reviews.

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Korpgud
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2020 11:53 am 
 

I'm thinking Mayhem.

I remember Grand Declaration of War being described as their absolute low point for many years after it came out. Now I hear more and more people describing it as "ahead its time". I assume it's because of the explosion of dissonant progressive black metal bands that came along in the wake of Deathspell Omega, sort of normalizing oddball black metal. I haven't personally listened to an entire album of theirs since Ordo ad Chao, but it seems to me they're doing better than ever.
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