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Commisaur
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Apr 04, 2013 1:16 am
Posts: 134
PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 10:20 am 
 

Why is it that it seems completely socially acceptable to like horror movies , but if you were to tell those same horror movie fans that you like Death Metal and Black Metal Extreme Metal etc... they will immediately look at you in disgust and horror and call you a devil worshipper? It seems so hypocritical. Extreme Metal is just audio paired with some static imagery (album art), and sometimes video imagery in the form of music videos which are always pretty tame in my mind, and words (lyrics) compared to an entire 1 hour plus motion picture featuring death and horror and blood and gore. Ok so maybe the “devil worshipping” thing gets to ppl. But isn’t this hypocritical considering the mainstream popularity of movies like the Excorist or the Omen? Ok so I guess those movies feature the point of view of the protagonist who is against the devil, demons and evil while extreme Metal with devil themes is often from the point of view of the anti-religious narrator in the lyrics? Is the aforementioned question the dichotomy that condemns Metal to pariah status? But on the other hand if they are not being anti-religious, Metal often paints a bleak picture of the world where the good guys lose and evil wins and there’s nothing the world can do about it. Is it also this hopeless nihilism and misanthropy that gets to ppl? Then again many of these ppl know nothing about Metal as they haven’t even bothered listening to it or given it a chance or tried to understand it (and they wouldn’t take the time to analyze Metal lyrics that’s for sure in the way ppl on this forum have), but these people still think they know something about it despite it all - so therefore it’s safe to say they have prejudiced ideas about metal. But where is their predjudice of it coming from? What’s informing their hypocritical outlook on the music, especially today in 2020? And don’t say the “media” because hasn’t it beeen a really long time (not since the 80s and 90s) when Metal was given negative mainstream media attention? If the media isn’t the source nowadays, then what is?
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colin040
Metal freak

Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2007 6:00 pm
Posts: 6088
Location: Netherlands
PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 10:30 am 
 

Commisaur wrote:
Why is it that it seems completely socially acceptable to like horror movies , but if you were to tell those same horror movie fans that you like Death Metal and Black Metal Extreme Metal etc... they will immediately look at you in disgust and horror and call you a devil worshipper?


Maybe because you have the numbers 666 written on your forehead?

Seriously though, I be this has never happened to plenty of people here. Not to me, at least.

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Empyreal
The Final Frontier

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 10:52 am 
 

There can't really be that many people who love horror movies but then call you a devil worshiper for liking extreme metal. I don't think this is a very big problem.

Nobody has cared about extreme metal being some shocking awful thing for decades now...
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jimbies
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Joined: Thu Jul 21, 2016 2:52 pm
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 10:56 am 
 

I think about this a little bit every year around Halloween, when it seems perfectly normal and embraced for people to be into the macabre side of things.

But I do agree, people don't seem to care much about metal being "scary" or "evil" anymore, because people that refer to Cannibal Corpse and Slayer as "Screamo".

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Boychev
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2015 10:49 am
Posts: 67
PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 11:08 am 
 

Most people don't really care for music that much, they just use it as pleasant background noise, for dancing, or to go out with friends at a concert or a club. Just listening to music for the sake of music is too abstract and requires a certain inclination that most people just don't get. Pretty much all girlfriends I've had have found it super weird that someone might just sit down with an album at home and listen to it without browsing online or reading or cleaning or doing dishes or whatever. The same conversation of "Well, how do you go to a live concert and listen to music without browsing?" - "Oh, well that's different, you're with other people there..." etc etc has played out multiple times. Movies on the contrary are probably the most accessible and ubiquitous artform there is (aside from TV which is pretty much the same thing) - unless we're talking about some avant-garde films (which make up a miniscule part of all movies out there), it's usually easy to get invested in the story and characters, and the entire thing is edited so as to catch your attention and thrill you.

In my experience, the more extreme forms of music take some time getting used to. Unless you already come from other parts of the artworld and are comfortable with some degree of abstraction, death metal will probably go way over your head if you don't already enjoy some lighter forms of metal and rock music. People usually start with 'tallica, Slayer, Pantera, "easier" bands like that and gradually develop a taste for the extreme. My guess is most people don't just randomly stumble across Cephalotripsy one day and think "huh, well that sounds nice". It's kind of like a hobby you develop, and this doesn't just go for extreme metal, this goes for any kind of investment in music whether we're talking avant-garde classical or following the contemporary mainstream pop scene.

On the other hand, most viewers would have no trouble processing Halloween or Alien or The Exorcist or whatever. They may not enjoy those, they may find them too disturbing, but it's easy to see what makes those films thrilling to watch. Film is just a more down-to-earth, humane kind of artform, even when it deals with the otherworldly and frightening.

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Auch
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Joined: Tue Jul 23, 2013 10:40 pm
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Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 11:18 am 
 

I find the premise of your question odd because I don’t think this happens a lot but also, because I think that some people are weirded out or put off by horror movie obsessives. The ones who look for really deep cuts and controversial films, etc. Like if you told someone you’re really into obscure body horror or horror gore films, I’m sure a stranger would have some judgements against you.

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Korpgud
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Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2013 7:09 pm
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Location: Sweden
PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 12:40 pm 
 

My take is this:

A horror movie is basically just a "normal" movie with a few jump scares. Death metal and black metal are constant sonic assaults. They're not just radio friendly rock songs with the occasional scream. Imagine Texas Chainsaw Massacre but without any suspense, only constant chainsawing.
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LithoJazzoSphere
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Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 1:13 pm 
 

I was thinking about that myself. Even films billed as "torture porn" like the Saw movies are basically just conventional thrillers for the most part with a handful of extra brutal scenes. With an extreme metal album you're relentlessly bombarded with growls, shrieks, indecipherable downtuned distorted riffs and hyperspeed drumming for most of the duration of an album, depending upon the particular subgenre and band. This is far more taxing to the normal person.

That said, I don't know if the distinction is as strong as the OP feels it is. It may have been more so at points, because I did ponder the same question myself a decade or two ago, but I think it's diminished over time. After the initial shock of the early DM and BM scenes, I think somewhere in the proliferation of metalcore and deathcore people had gotten used to encountering the existence of more extreme music, even if they didn't particularly enjoy it themselves.

But to the degree that there is any remaining difference in prestige, it may also be that horror has become a bit more of an accepted medium for acclaimed figures and the delivery of social messages. Jordan Peele's Get Out is a good more recent example. I would suspect people see more artistic merit in such efforts compared to the earlier slasher film stigma. While metal has its own bands who pose interesting social and philosophical messaging, they tend to be a bit more niche, as they aren't played in mainstream radio programming, so you have to go looking for them rather than just being able to walk into a multiplex and there often being at least one horror film available for viewing.


Last edited by LithoJazzoSphere on Fri Nov 20, 2020 1:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Inkshooter
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Location: Seattle
PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 1:16 pm 
 

The reason most people don't like metal has very little to do with its dark imagery and almost everything to do with the way it sounds. Most people like music that is upbeat or relaxing or fun to dance to. Just harsh vocals by themselves are off-putting to a great majority of music listeners that aren't already metal fans.
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TheLoneForest
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Mar 19, 2011 3:16 pm
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Location: Quebec
PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 1:38 pm 
 

Commisaur wrote:
Why is it that it seems completely socially acceptable to like horror movies , but if you were to tell those same horror movie fans that you like Death Metal and Black Metal Extreme Metal etc... they will immediately look at you in disgust and horror and call you a devil worshipper? It seems so hypocritical.


Literally nobody thinks like this. This isn't the 90s anymore

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matras
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 6:01 am
Posts: 1040
Location: Sweden
PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 1:53 pm 
 

Metal heads really have the biggest persecution complex of all subcultures, and it needs to stop. Metal heads are not society's outcasts, public enemy no1 and people don't think you're an extreme weirdo for listening to metal, and metal isn't seen as "a subversive element to the pillars of society" other than in ass-backwards conservative places that wish they could live in the 19th century.

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Unorthodox
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 8:08 pm
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 2:02 pm 
 

I do wonder if all this Alex Jones talk of leftists being "satanic pedophiles" will eventually create a cultural impact on wearing metal merch (upside crosses/pentagrams/etc). The easiest retort to this is that the catholic church has been illuminated as an institution that accepts widespread pedophilia. Therefore, one could argue antichristian symbols are inherently anti pedophile.

Either way, we can say all we want that we don't live in the 90s, but in reality the average person hasn't really changed much since the 90s. There's just more disinformation and loony crap to buy into than those times.
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Empyreal
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 2:09 pm 
 

Unorthodox wrote:
I do wonder if all this Alex Jones talk of leftists being "satanic pedophiles" will eventually create a cultural impact on wearing metal merch (upside crosses/pentagrams/etc). The easiest retort to this is that the catholic church has been illuminated as an institution that accepts widespread pedophilia. Therefore, one could argue antichristian symbols are inherently anti pedophile.

Either way, we can say all we want that we don't live in the 90s, but in reality the average person hasn't really changed much since the 90s. There's just more disinformation and loony crap to buy into than those times.


I just don't think so really. It's unlikely that metal will come back to being some taboo, dangerous thing - the big 70s and 80s bands are thought of as classic rock and newer extreme styles are accepted enough that they're more likely to be parodied affectionately than looked at as anything that scary. I think people grew up with this stuff as part of the culture for decades and so now it isn't as surprising anymore unless you're like 95 and living in some American midwest town where they only teach the Bible. At worst metal is ignored, not treated like a pariah. The culture has shifted away from stigmatizing anti-Christian or blasphemous ideas and more towards the MeToo types of stories and scandals - the only times you get anything scandalous about metal now is if something like that happens in the news. And even then it's all so fragmented and there's so much news that not everyone cares.
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Sepulchrave
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 2:20 pm 
 

TheLoneForest wrote:
Commisaur wrote:
Why is it that it seems completely socially acceptable to like horror movies , but if you were to tell those same horror movie fans that you like Death Metal and Black Metal Extreme Metal etc... they will immediately look at you in disgust and horror and call you a devil worshipper? It seems so hypocritical.


Literally nobody thinks like this. This isn't the 90s anymore


in the western world, for sure, but here i still sometimes encounter devout catholics who freak out a bit and question me when i'm wearing a darkthrone shirt or whatever, even younger people are a bit like that. i expect it's worse in more religious regions such as the middle east.
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HeavenDuff
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Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 10:35 pm
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Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 2:32 pm 
 

I've asked myself this very question and gave it some thoughts over the years, and I think I might have a possible explanation to this. Before I present it I wanted to address people in the thread who are taking the OP word a little too literally. Although most people do not think were Satan worshippers for liking more extreme forms of metal, some still react negatively to this information. Because of the violence, gore and horror references, it is often a subject of questionning and is negatively received by a lot of people.

For instance, in high school, I remember having to present a song with political or social comments in English class, and our teacher kept repeating that the lyrics to Megadeth songs were violent (he also thought the name was Megadeath and we had to explain to him the meaning of the actual name) and he kept saying "But it's violent" as if it was inherently a negative trait.

I think the reason why people react differently to these same themes in movies versus in music is because the lyrics to the vast majority of popular music are presented in what the lyricist/vocalist actually thinks or feels. They often are personnal takes on subject like emotions, and even when they deal with more abstract things, they are spoken through the mouth of someone who, more often then not, conveys these feelings and thoughts as his own. While in cinema, the camera seems to be a passive witness to something that is going on, and movies often are far more fictious in their tone, and if there is a crazy killer in a movie like in Silence of the Lambs, the movie doesn't seem to condone the acts perpetrated by the killer. They are just telling the tale.

So in pop, usually even when the lyrics are pessimistic or telling negative things, they are told from the perspective of someone who looks negatively on these things.

But in metal, namely with bands like Origin, horrors are described in a very cold, factual manner, as if they are just describing the horrors. I'm thinking of songs like Aftermath, which described in graphic details the horrors of nuclear holocaust.

And even more challenging to the casual listener, with bands like Cannibal Corpse, not only do you have horrors being described to you, but they are being told from the psychotic killer/rapist perspective. And that often triggers people. With CC, you're not following Clarice in her investigation to catch Buffalo Bill, you're viewing the story through his eyes and hearing his thoughts.

Not only that, but extreme metal music often is abrasive, while people are looking for music that is uplifting, or when they feel down, music that translates into music and words their feelings of nostlagia, melancholy or sadness. In cinema, people are a little bit more used to unsettling images, to horror stories and frightening tales. They actually go looking for these in horror or thriller movies. I think it has a lot to do with how the two media are differently perceived in their functions in pop culture. Music often is a more personnal and direct outlet, while cinema is more about fiction and tales.

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Commisaur
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Apr 04, 2013 1:16 am
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 3:05 pm 
 

HeavenDuff wrote:
I've asked myself this very question and gave it some thoughts over the years, and I think I might have a possible explanation to this. Before I present it I wanted to address people in the thread who are taking the OP word a little too literally. Although most people do not think were Satan worshippers for liking more extreme forms of metal, some still react negatively to this information. Because of the violence, gore and horror references, it is often a subject of questionning and is negatively received by a lot of people.

For instance, in high school, I remember having to present a song with political or social comments in English class, and our teacher kept repeating that the lyrics to Megadeth songs were violent (he also thought the name was Megadeath and we had to explain to him the meaning of the actual name) and he kept saying "But it's violent" as if it was inherently a negative trait.

I think the reason why people react differently to these same themes in movies versus in music is because the lyrics to the vast majority of popular music are presented in what the lyricist/vocalist actually thinks or feels. They often are personnal takes on subject like emotions, and even when they deal with more abstract things, they are spoken through the mouth of someone who, more often then not, conveys these feelings and thoughts as his own. While in cinema, the camera seems to be a passive witness to something that is going on, and movies often are far more fictious in their tone, and if there is a crazy killer in a movie like in Silence of the Lambs, the movie doesn't seem to condone the acts perpetrated by the killer. They are just telling the tale.

So in pop, usually even when the lyrics are pessimistic or telling negative things, they are told from the perspective of someone who looks negatively on these things.

But in metal, namely with bands like Origin, horrors are described in a very cold, factual manner, as if they are just describing the horrors. I'm thinking of songs like Aftermath, which described in graphic details the horrors of nuclear holocaust.

And even more challenging to the casual listener, with bands like Cannibal Corpse, not only do you have horrors being described to you, but they are being told from the psychotic killer/rapist perspective. And that often triggers people. With CC, you're not following Clarice in her investigation to catch Buffalo Bill, you're viewing the story through his eyes and hearing his thoughts.

Not only that, but extreme metal music often is abrasive, while people are looking for music that is uplifting, or when they feel down, music that translates into music and words their feelings of nostlagia, melancholy or sadness. In cinema, people are a little bit more used to unsettling images, to horror stories and frightening tales. They actually go looking for these in horror or thriller movies. I think it has a lot to do with how the two media are differently perceived in their functions in pop culture. Music often is a more personnal and direct outlet, while cinema is more about fiction and tales.


I think you hit it on the nail. Thanks for understanding my post.

To the others who have posted, I have lived in the big urban areas in CA and TX my entire life and there are a sizable amount of people I have met who looked at me in horror when I said that I listened to “metal,” and I hadn’t even clarified further to tell them what kind of metal I like! To those of you who said that you have made your metal music tastes known to others and received no negativity in response, what bands did you even reveal to these people? Because the stigma for a lot of 80s and 90s extreme Metal is still there as it was back when it started. Deicide for example will never be acceptable. To any non metal listener who is made known of that band and their lyrics and imagery - they will be offended. When I felt the time was right in my relationship with my girlfriend to be honest and upfront about my music, I told her some details about Necrophobic and Deicide (two of my favorites, I only like their first albums though) regarding some of some of their anti-religious lyrics and being Christian her response was one of horror and shock. Thankfully, we got over it and she quickly grew to accept my music, but I had a lot of explaining to do. I would say that’s a prime example of the still strong stigma. Definitely not something you go in depth talking about on a first date that’s for sure.

Another girl whom I dated once, whom I had just finished talking to about horror movies (mainstream stuff no extreme horror like Cannibal Holocaust lol), looked at me in horror and shock when I said simply I listen to “metal.” I didn’t even get into any subgenres! She was horrified at just “metal!” And this date was in San Francisco, CA! And she had already told me earlier in the date that she wasn’t religious at all.

While in college at one of the biggest cities in CA, a roommate I once had immediately muttered under his breath “I don’t listen to that devil worshiper stuff” immediately in response to me saying that I like “rock music.” And again I didn’t even mention any subgenres ! All I said was “rock music,” I hadn’t even discovered or grown to like extreme metal yet
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Unorthodox
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 8:08 pm
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 3:26 pm 
 

Commisaur wrote:
Another girl whom I dated once, whom I had just finished talking to about horror movies (mainstream stuff no extreme horror like Cannibal Holocaust lol), looked at me in horror and shock when I said simply I listen to “metal.” I didn’t even get into any subgenres! She was horrified at just “metal!” And this date was in San Francisco, CA! And she had already told me earlier in the date that she wasn’t religious at all.


See, I just realize those kind of people and I are just not going to work out. Maybe as friends, but definitely not gf or dating material. There's plenty of people that don't listen to metal but don't place that sort of judgement if you do, so why bother?
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EldritchSun
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Joined: Wed Nov 11, 2020 5:51 pm
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 3:43 pm 
 

Basically people have a more or less solid idea about what horror movies are and they just avoid them but their concept of extreme metal is usually very distorted, satanized/demonized and vague.

The other thing is that people can separate the actor from the character. People don't do that with metal musicians, because the metalhead in general terms is the same everywhere. Hopkins don't walk by the street dressed as Hannibal, but Glen Benton goes shopping dressed "as" Glen Benton.

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Vadara
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Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2016 11:14 pm
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 4:25 pm 
 

Boychev wrote:
Most people don't really care for music that much, they just use it as pleasant background noise, for dancing, or to go out with friends at a concert or a club. Just listening to music for the sake of music is too abstract and requires a certain inclination that most people just don't get.


This really is it. My dad is a boomer and he views music as nothing but background noise or nostalgia-fuel. He finds the idea of music that expresses any theme, emotion, or feel besides pleasantness to be off-putting bordering on deviously perverse. The sole exception is 70's prog rock like Yes and Rush and that's almost certainly because he listened to those as a teenager/young adult.

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tomcat_ha
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 5:21 pm 
 

I think that this kind of stopped being a thing in more recent times. Younger people tend to respect metal a lot more but always have something to say about the vocals.

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EricJ
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Joined: Wed Feb 21, 2018 8:47 pm
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 7:05 pm 
 

Inkshooter wrote:
The reason most people don't like metal has very little to do with its dark imagery and almost everything to do with the way it sounds. Most people like music that is upbeat or relaxing or fun to dance to. Just harsh vocals by themselves are off-putting to a great majority of music listeners that aren't already metal fans.



This sums it up best I think. More people appreciate 'dark imagery' than they do 'some guy screaming into a microphone.'

You could have a conversation w/ just about anyone in regards to horror movies. However, the moment you play them death or black metal, they'll say something like "how can you listen to this shit?" lol....that's my experience.

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Unorthodox
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 7:23 pm 
 

Idk, all these conversations come down to anecdotes and whatnot so I don't really think any of us can objectively say whether the dark imagery in metal is a detraction or not compared to the music. I think it's pretty obvious anyone that doesn't like harsh vocals isn't going to like a lot of extreme metal, but the imagery certainly could be an extra bit of icing on the cake.

I do remember I had a Marduk poster up in my room for a while and got some serious looks by a few of my buddies that are giant hip hop heads when they'd come over. One of them just gave a finger point and looked at my friend. Friend replied with "yeah n*gga that's 666 and an upside down cross, some legit devil worship!" in a very worrisome manner. They got over it, but it was almost the equivalent of when I step in some yahoo hillbilly's house and see the 'don't tread on me' flag.

The thing about horror movies is that they're usually not told from the perspective of the killer/demon/etc. The story is set up so that they're the villain and everyone that is followed as the protagonist is a normal person. Fuck- even purity and various christian values are implied in a lot of slasher and horror films. Especially those that show teenagers getting killed right after having sex.

That's vastly different than "embracing darkness" or whatever, which everyone from Marilyn Manson to Marduk does. Personally, I think it shows a philosophical difference between people. I don't see people as good or bad, part of 'the light' or 'the darkness'. I see them as a mixture of the two, yin and yang, as above so below, etc. A lot of metal just happens to reflect the darker aspects of being human, and some people would rather put their fucking head in the sand and pretend it doesn't exist. Or, maybe they're so surrounded by it that they don't want to embrace it on an artistic level.
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Ill-Starred Son
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 9:38 pm 
 

I've also thought about this and agree that even though metal has become more acceptable with many people, there's still a whole lot of people who, if you really delve into the topic and discuss what some more metal songs are about, may start to express some concern with the subject matter and be bothered by it.

I even have a friend who is into a lot of metal but not extreme metal or death metal, more power metal, traditional metal and a little bit of melo-death, and I remember listening to some Cannibal Corpse songs off The Bleeding with him and his girlfriend, in particular the songs on that album where Barnes is talking in the perspective of a killer who is killing women, and we got into a discussion of whether or not he was "serious" about it, and my friend goes "yeah, I'm pretty sure he's serious", and what he meant by that was obviously that he thought that because Barnes was writing like that that it meant he wanted to kill people.

I didn't bring up the horror movie comparison, but later thought to myself "why would he think that Chris Barnes any more wants to kill people because he sings about it in Cannibal Corpse than that the actors or director of Texas Chainsaw Massacre want to kill people?"

And again, it's somehow this idea that what the vocalist of a band sings about is his perspective, when in actuality it might be a character he's playing or him just venting or expressing ideas, whereas anything that happens in a movie is seen as purely fictional.

Somehow, people view movies or books as these fictional worlds, but most people don't view music as being a medium that really does that kind of thing, and I think it's because so much music is superficial.

For most people, (and I'm not saying metal is the only creative genre that takes someone into other headspaces cause jazz, prog rock and other styles can do it also), music is not something expansive that can go places like a movie can, it's meant to be more literal or else just background noise.

But metal is a genre of music that seeks to really take the listener somewhere further in much the same way movies or books might, but still with the lyrical thoughts being expressed by only one singer, so that somehow unless you are into metal or other similarly expansive music or have an open mind, you could easily imagine that the singer's words are 100% literal. People then assume that the listener is also taking those words literally and some people will judge them for it.

It does still happen, though not as often as it used to.

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LithoJazzoSphere
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 21, 2020 12:29 am 
 

Another substantial part of it I think is that many people just don't wanted to be challenged musically. Not that it's inherently bad, I'm sure for most of us there's at least some part of our lives that we don't put that much thought into or care that much about and have fairly unsophisticated interests. That might be film, TV, visual art, books, food, clothing, politics, religious beliefs, vehicles, languages, landscaping, traveling history, or many other things. There simply isn't time to be heavily invested in and well-researched on every single hobby and interest, no one has that many hours in a day. So for a lot of other people music is one of their weaker areas.

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e_ddi_e
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 21, 2020 6:54 am 
 

Has anyone not living in the US actually encountered this?

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Metallumz
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 21, 2020 10:53 am 
 

Its ironic how the mainstream public looks down upon Metalheads as being violent and/or aggressive yet in the US (although with 'Drill' music in the UK is becoming more common) it's the rap-music & artists who go out of their way to project violence unto others, and over stupid laughable things too. Maybe back in the early 90s there was a handful of musicians from Norway who went a little out of their way over the whole Satanism/Church Burnings, but 99% of us are actually okay people.

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Empyreal
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 21, 2020 11:36 am 
 

Metallumz wrote:
Its ironic how the mainstream public looks down upon Metalheads as being violent and/or aggressive yet in the US (although with 'Drill' music in the UK is becoming more common) it's the rap-music & artists who go out of their way to project violence unto others, and over stupid laughable things too. Maybe back in the early 90s there was a handful of musicians from Norway who went a little out of their way over the whole Satanism/Church Burnings, but 99% of us are actually okay people.


I mean 99% of hip hop artists and fans are also okay people too though.
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EldritchSun
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Joined: Wed Nov 11, 2020 5:51 pm
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 21, 2020 12:00 pm 
 

Metallumz wrote:
Its ironic how the mainstream public looks down upon Metalheads as being violent and/or aggressive yet in the US (although with 'Drill' music in the UK is becoming more common) it's the rap-music & artists who go out of their way to project violence unto others, and over stupid laughable things too. Maybe back in the early 90s there was a handful of musicians from Norway who went a little out of their way over the whole Satanism/Church Burnings, but 99% of us are actually okay people.

What IS ironic is you doing exactly the same thing you are describing.

It's not weird tho. All people do the same thing.

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in_the_sign_of_metal
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Joined: Sat Jan 26, 2019 8:10 pm
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 21, 2020 1:07 pm 
 

I've often thought about this as well and agree with many of the posts above me here. I've found that no matter what you're into music wise, if you're self aware (not trying to say OP isn't), and are just cool with people, they usually don't care what you're into.

Also, horror movies operate a bit differently than this music does. People go to horror movies with hopes to be scared and get that adrenaline pumping. Music is a haven where (most) people go not to feel anxious, scared or whatever. Even people who are super into extreme metal will probably tell you the music gives them a sense of catharsis. The fact of the matter is that for most people, growls and blast beats do not equate to relaxation/pleasant sounds.
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Chaosmonger
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 21, 2020 2:22 pm 
 

it has more to do with looks. Most horror fans aren't necessarily wearing Freddy shirts on their day to day and probably look like 'normal' people compared to the metalhead with the long hair and black band shirts with Satanic imagery on them.

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megadeth93
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2020 7:20 pm
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 21, 2020 3:09 pm 
 

e_ddi_e wrote:
Has anyone not living in the US actually encountered this?


About 10 years ago I was a lecturer in Australia and wore Heavy Metal T-shirts to work (but not in classes). It was a small, conservative, right-wing country town (population 100,000). One day I was wearing a band shirt with artwork on it of male demons grabbing female angels (a bit like the Dawn of Possession album cover). A middle-aged female secretary quietly made negative comments to me about the T-shirt, saying it was sexist, etc. I was taken by surprise and just mumbled that it was "only artwork." A year or two later I got pushed out of the job for trivial reasons and always wondered whether the shirt had set a train in motion. Now if I wear shirts it would be just be Saxon or KISS or Scorpions, i.e.very harmless.

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interstellar_medium
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Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2020 9:41 am
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 21, 2020 5:01 pm 
 

megadeth93 wrote:
KISS or Scorpions, i.e.very harmless.


Isn't it ironic that these bands aren't exactly "not sexist"?

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Lagartija
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Joined: Wed Aug 02, 2006 10:27 am
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Location: Spain
PostPosted: Sat Nov 21, 2020 7:11 pm 
 

I love it when non-metalheads tell me "oh, but you seem so normal and polite, I can't imagine you listening to that stuff" while, at the same time, many metalheads can't get over the fact that I don't like horror or gore films :-D

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Hexenmacht46290
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2020 8:30 pm
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Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat Nov 21, 2020 8:30 pm 
 

I am currently at work, on a break, wearing a Church of Misery shirt, with a drawing of a woman(with an eyepatch, looking down the sights of a gun, and one exposed nipple. I wear my Dying Fetus shirt to work. Not the one depicting ‘kill your mother, rape your dog,’(too edgy for me) but one with a photo of the band, and your dates. I was wearing it in the Safeway, down the street once(most people who work here don’t live in the same town, as our workplace, it’s more of a rich suburban area), and some stereotypical “Karen” was looking at it, with disgust. Other than that, no one says anything. I’m more likely to get the reaction of “fuckin’ Slayer,” or if it’s some obscure stoner metal band’s fantasy artwork, people talk about the art. Maybe my workplace just has more people who are into alternative subcultures, however, because I do see people with t shirts of horror movies, too. But, even outside of that self selection bias, of people who aren’t really going to find me shocking, it’s more positive reactions, than negative. I first learned that Slayer was retiring, when a cashier, at Costco asked if I had heard. I think she asked, because I was wearing a Sepultura shirt. And another cashier there, was asking me about doom/sludge metal bands. I might just live in a bubble though, because while I live in a redneck town, the nearest big city is an artistic, college town. At the same time though, I often meet people who don’t look like stereotypical metal heads, but are into some of the more accessible extreme metal, like Celtic Frost, and Death. Maybe they aren’t “hipsters,” and just like the music.

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Curious_dead
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Sep 20, 2006 12:13 pm
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 21, 2020 9:01 pm 
 

colin040 wrote:
Commisaur wrote:
Why is it that it seems completely socially acceptable to like horror movies , but if you were to tell those same horror movie fans that you like Death Metal and Black Metal Extreme Metal etc... they will immediately look at you in disgust and horror and call you a devil worshipper?


Maybe because you have the numbers 666 written on your forehead?

Seriously though, I be this has never happened to plenty of people here. Not to me, at least.


The only time it happened to me was actually hilarious. I went to Montreal Comiccon with a metal shirt. It was a The Satanist Behemoth t-shirt. As I was going out of the center, there were a few Jesus freaks distributing tracts, and as he saw my t-shirt he said something like: "Satan is not a superhero, praise Jesus!" or something like that, and me and my girlfriend just laughed out loud in his face.

Same shirt, different story: I'm waiting for the bus and a man walks up to me. He asks me if I'm interested in Jehova's Witnesses, I say no thanks. He asks me why, so I say I'm not a Christian, and he stands there dumbfounded and babbles "Are you a Jew?" and it took all my resolve not to laugh in his face. It was a fucking weird assumption to make as there aren't many Jews where I live, and I was wearing a t-shirt with occult, satanist symbols and imagery, very visible.

I love that t-shirt btw.

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megadeth93
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Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2020 7:20 pm
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2020 1:04 pm 
 

interstellar_medium wrote:
megadeth93 wrote:
KISS or Scorpions, i.e.very harmless.


Isn't it ironic that these bands aren't exactly "not sexist"?


True, but I guess the woman didn't know about those bands. But Death Metal T-shirt artwork does seem to freak some people out whereas artwork in an art gallery probably wouldn't as it is considered "socially approved."

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megadeth93
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2020 7:20 pm
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2020 1:07 pm 
 

Curious_dead wrote:
colin040 wrote:
Commisaur wrote:
Why is it that it seems completely socially acceptable to like horror movies , but if you were to tell those same horror movie fans that you like Death Metal and Black Metal Extreme Metal etc... they will immediately look at you in disgust and horror and call you a devil worshipper?


Maybe because you have the numbers 666 written on your forehead?

Seriously though, I be this has never happened to plenty of people here. Not to me, at least.


The only time it happened to me was actually hilarious. I went to Montreal Comiccon with a metal shirt. It was a The Satanist Behemoth t-shirt. As I was going out of the center, there were a few Jesus freaks distributing tracts, and as he saw my t-shirt he said something like: "Satan is not a superhero, praise Jesus!" or something like that, and me and my girlfriend just laughed out loud in his face.

Same shirt, different story: I'm waiting for the bus and a man walks up to me. He asks me if I'm interested in Jehova's Witnesses, I say no thanks. He asks me why, so I say I'm not a Christian, and he stands there dumbfounded and babbles "Are you a Jew?" and it took all my resolve not to laugh in his face. It was a fucking weird assumption to make as there aren't many Jews where I live, and I was wearing a t-shirt with occult, satanist symbols and imagery, very visible.

I love that t-shirt btw.


"Behemoth are posers" might have been a better answer from those Christians at Montreal Comiccon.

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blackmantram
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2010 12:51 pm
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2020 4:06 pm 
 

LOL this thread man, turns out that by 2020 metalheads are now the outsiders of society? Pretty sure most people here are making shit up or over exaggerating it.
Only relatable story so far is the Jehovah Witness one and that happens all the time regardless if you like metal or not. Also, I hope the screamo comment was a joke.

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Vadara
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2016 11:14 pm
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Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2020 7:07 pm 
 

For a different perspective as a black person I have definitely had other black people in my family (like my mom) express concern for me liking metal because they think every metalhead is a skinhead neo-nazi. Like, the association with satanism and the like doesn't register for them at all, even though they are mostly Christian as hell, weirdly enough.

I actually happened to go to high school right as deathcore blew up and I do not remember students getting called out for wearing those tacky as hell -core t-shirts, like they wore that shit to school and didn't even get into trouble lol

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Unorthodox
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 8:08 pm
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2020 8:42 pm 
 

Yeah, kinda empathize with that worry about skinheads tbh :/. That's why even though some of the 'cancelling' of certain metal bands can get a bit ridiculous I'm usually on board with it, because it's long overdue calling out the spades as spades.

Also, on a tangential note, I do think metal is becoming a lot more diverse than it was, say, ten or twenty years ago. Maybe it's just me, but I see a lot more diversity at shows these days (not exactly 'these days' because, well, no ones going to shows :lol:).
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