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Bingewolf
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Sep 18, 2017 9:59 pm
Posts: 648
Location: United States
PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2019 11:20 pm 
 

Gemini 7 Rising wrote:
So, later on, Marilyn Manson's 'Antichrist Superstar' arrived and gave me that similar 'Is this okay to listen to?' vibe for a moment, and then when I became aware of extreme metal, I wasn't quite sure what to make of it at first. I'd never gotten into Slayer back in the day, so I hadn't quite found that 'gateway' band... but now I was intrigued. The music was so dense and impenetrable at first, and that's one of the things we come to love about it- that it's 'just noise' to the average person. They can't hear the workmanship, passion, talent, etc.,- it's all invisible and the lyrics are just the final 'KEEP OUT'. And I don't mean 'average' in any condescending way, but anyhow, I made that investment, I guess you could call it, and finally got into Slayer, early Lamb Of God and Mastodon, and then it was like being caught in a tractor beam. The floodgates opened and I discovered all of it.

And interestingly, DEICIDE was again a bit of a stretch for me, personally, even after getting into death, black and grindcore, just because, I guess, that Catholic upbringing never completely goes away and, let's face it, Glen Benton seems like a bit of a dick on top of it all. So it all kind of happened in stages, until I was fully immersed, and this music continues to keep me entertained and stimulated, so I'm sure I'll be listening when I'm 80, if I'm still around. But there are days when I need to put on some other type of music just to give myself a bit of a break.


Oh yeah, when you find out what the name "Deicide" is and then you see the upside down cross scarred into Glen's head, that's one that will definitely throw a young kid!

And I wanted to second your Marilyn Manson choice as well. I grew up in an extremely conservative christian household (and fully followed that for most of my childhood) so when I first saw Marilyn Manson, it scared me. One of my closest friends in school was as music obsessed as me and we used to watch MTV all the time to see music videos - and I can recall us turning off Manson videos because it felt like we were doing something wrong just to watch them. So funny to remember that in hindsight!

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Gemini 7 Rising
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Apr 04, 2013 1:08 am
Posts: 320
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2019 12:36 am 
 

Bingewolf wrote:
Gemini 7 Rising wrote:
So, later on, Marilyn Manson's 'Antichrist Superstar' arrived and gave me that similar 'Is this okay to listen to?' vibe for a moment, and then when I became aware of extreme metal, I wasn't quite sure what to make of it at first. I'd never gotten into Slayer back in the day, so I hadn't quite found that 'gateway' band... but now I was intrigued. The music was so dense and impenetrable at first, and that's one of the things we come to love about it- that it's 'just noise' to the average person. They can't hear the workmanship, passion, talent, etc.,- it's all invisible and the lyrics are just the final 'KEEP OUT'. And I don't mean 'average' in any condescending way, but anyhow, I made that investment, I guess you could call it, and finally got into Slayer, early Lamb Of God and Mastodon, and then it was like being caught in a tractor beam. The floodgates opened and I discovered all of it.

And interestingly, DEICIDE was again a bit of a stretch for me, personally, even after getting into death, black and grindcore, just because, I guess, that Catholic upbringing never completely goes away and, let's face it, Glen Benton seems like a bit of a dick on top of it all. So it all kind of happened in stages, until I was fully immersed, and this music continues to keep me entertained and stimulated, so I'm sure I'll be listening when I'm 80, if I'm still around. But there are days when I need to put on some other type of music just to give myself a bit of a break.


Oh yeah, when you find out what the name "Deicide" is and then you see the upside down cross scarred into Glen's head, that's one that will definitely throw a young kid!

And I wanted to second your Marilyn Manson choice as well. I grew up in an extremely conservative christian household (and fully followed that for most of my childhood) so when I first saw Marilyn Manson, it scared me. One of my closest friends in school was as music obsessed as me and we used to watch MTV all the time to see music videos - and I can recall us turning off Manson videos because it felt like we were doing something wrong just to watch them. So funny to remember that in hindsight!


I love that, thanks for sharing, on both counts. Yeah, you can feel a bit ridiculous later, like, 'What was I thinking? It's just music & imagery', but everyone's childhood does shape them to some extent, whether they know it or not, and some never break free of whatever 'shackles' they perceive, so it's great to hear we weren't alone. And there is still a line for me somewhere, in the darkest sub-realms of some brutal death metal, etc., where the lyrics are a bit too much & all traces of fantasy have been removed and they sound a little too serious for my personal taste. But it's far beyond the likes of Cannibal Corpse or Deicide or Immolation & so on. Those bands rule and I love their music and lyrics. And I look at others like Marilyn Manson & Behemoth, blasphemous as they can be, as more philosophical in their messages than anything.

Oh yeah- and I remember some of those Manson videos, they were pretty scary for their time.
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blackdiamond74
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue Feb 09, 2010 10:39 am
Posts: 89
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2019 11:14 am 
 

If I had to pinpoint a time and release it would be Slayer's Seasons in the Abyss. I had got this CD for xmas along with Hot in the Shade (Kiss, turrible release) and Winger's debut (I didn't ask for this). I still have the Hot in the Shade and Seasons discs. Up to this point I was basically a rock fan growing up with Kiss and then a bit later Motley Crue and Ratt. I had heard plenty of other music and 'metal' in my friends' cars, including the obligatory Metallica and Megadeth, and some Slayer. Iron Maiden too. This was a different time and without being the old man 'get off my lawn' stuff, when I got new music I would give it time and pour over the booklet wearing a pair of cheap headphones. And Seasons was certainly different than what was in my wheelhouse at that time, which was mainly bands writing about chasing tail. And Seasons, not that I knew it at the time, was a perfect mix of Reign and South. Before I had this I remember seeing the War Ensemble video on Headbanger's Ball, and I was kind of eh. But then after having it, playing it over and over, reading the lyrics, it took on a different life for me. I could play this entire disc in my head from front to back.

So that helped the branching out process from rock/hair metal to more aggressive music. The next 'metal' album I remember relating to was Persistence of Time. And what was cool was that my buddy and I got to see Anthrax and Slayer (one last time, I think) this past September and hearing them crank out Born of Fire, a personal Slayer favorite, was a cool highlight.

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Vanthos_Anasthasia
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2019 11:46 am
Posts: 56
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2019 12:19 pm 
 

I was already into old punk like Misfits/Samhain, The Exploited, Casualties, basically a lot of your catchy fast hardcore stuff. I was also into, thanks to early internet radio at the time hosted by Yahoo and Lycos, getting into a lot of deathrock and goth-punk like 45 Grave and Christian Death. I was and still am a sucker for all the Batcave aesthetic and sound. At this time I'd been shown both death metal and some traditional metal with very high vocals (Ozzy grated my ears and Iron Maiden was incredibly annoying). I didn't like any of it it.

Next thing you know a friend makes me a mix CD of Slayer's 80s material. Complete with a little booklet of scans for each album cover that he had printed and glued together himself. On the way home in the bus I didn't have my CD player, but was looking at the covers. First thing I noticed was just how raw and more like street art they were. I loved the amateurish but also evil as fuck Show No Mercy. I loved the death-obsessed collage of South of Heaven. Hell Awaits was just over the top macabre.

When I put them into my stereo, extra loud because mom and dad weren't home, I was immediately taken in. I at first thought this was punk music, just with a better production. I loved the way that a lot of these songs had intros with cool drum fills and iconic riffs before going into full speed circle pit mode. The hardcore speed drumming broken up with Lombardo's fills and rolls are what I needed. And the riffs.........they were like an evil and possessed version of the bands I mentioned above. The vocals were obviously the most influenced by that angry punk shout/snarl than anything else I've heard. I was in. The first one I went and bought was actually Seasons in the Abyss because I wanted the album that had Born in Fire and Spirit in Black. Reign in Blood came after. Hell Awaits was the slow burner, but is now my favorite.

After this I dove all in seeking after this thrash metal style. And it was the high screams of some of these bands, and I had to learn with Araya, that made me appreciate trad metal vocals. Artillery, Onslaught, and Hirax really helped. I gave Maiden and Sabbath another try and it all clicked. Power metal has been really hit and miss but I've found some good ones over the years.

For some years I was hooked on death metal, and I still have a lot in my collection that I still listen to. But I got burnt out on it very quickly. It's gotta be something special and even then I can only appreciate and album or two before moving on. Thrash and speed will always remain perfect to me because of that balance between aggression and brutality, and melody and songwriting.

To this day though I'm careful not to just call myself a metalhead. I mean sure it's basically true, but I've met too many people that hold to the label and they come off as extreme dickheads when they come into contact with other stuff I like. And even though I don't like bands like Rhapsody or Helloween very much at all, I always cringe when I mention something like Overkill or Helstar at some metal gathering or another and a dude in a Deicide shirt says something homophobic about it. I still love goth and post-punk, and a ton of different types of dark electronic music. But similarly, I don't front myself as repping those subcultures.

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Gemini 7 Rising
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Apr 04, 2013 1:08 am
Posts: 320
Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2021 12:56 am 
 

blackdiamond74 wrote:
If I had to pinpoint a time and release it would be Slayer's Seasons in the Abyss. Up to this point I was basically a rock fan growing up with Kiss and then a bit later Motley Crue and Ratt. I had heard plenty of other music and 'metal' in my friends' cars, including the obligatory Metallica and Megadeth... And Seasons was certainly different than what was in my wheelhouse at that time


This is similar to my metal beginnings. And just put on Seasons in the Abyss last week (it had been several years since I'd listened) and it kind of blew me away. Even stronger and better than I'd remembered. It's aged well, I think.
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AWinterShadow
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:13 pm
Posts: 21
PostPosted: Sat Jan 09, 2021 11:51 am 
 

The beginning of my Metal love didn't really stand out. Probably because my earlier music exposure was so broad it just seemed natural to gravitate to the more gradually heavier stuff. Starting with my parents and 50s/60s music that turned into 70's classic rock, pop and Country.

But I believe the point of no return was during grade school during recess...at a Lutheran school my parents were sending us to at that time. It was Kiss's "Lick it Up", Ozzy Ozbourne "Diary of a Madman' and "Bark at the Moon" along with Stryper "Soldiers Under Command" (I think, it might have even been "To Hell With The Devil". That one I just recall the yellow&black colors.) All on cassette's played on a shitty little tape player they had in the class room for some reason. I also recall Prince & the Revolution's "Purple Rain" from those years. Along with my first exposure to Dungeons and Dragons at the time, those album covers stood out even if the music was more of a background appreciation at the time. I wouldn't personally own any of those albums until years later.

There were some albums and songs that came after that which stand out. But for early exposure that lead me to them, this was the 'moments in time' that pointed me down the path of harder and heavier as metal grew and expanded and I started getting old enough to start choosing and buying my own music.

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megadeth93
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2020 7:20 pm
Posts: 53
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Sat Jan 09, 2021 4:06 pm 
 

Hearing Judas Priest as a high-school guy and seeing their leather and studs look. Also learning that metal was kind of a secret subculture - as it still was where I lived in 1984-85 - with its own record store in the center of the city - added hugely to the appeal.

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LithoJazzoSphere
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2020 8:11 pm
Posts: 1631
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat Jan 09, 2021 9:06 pm 
 

This is a bit of a challenging one because I'm not sure there was ever one particular moment, just a series of minor epiphanies, and I may be retrospectively imposing more weight on particular moments than even consciously occurred to me, but I guess that's what we have to do in psychoanalytic historical analysis. Anyway, I feel like the moment came somewhere in the period where I got really into Fear Factory, In Flames, and Opeth. There were a few other extreme bands I heard songs from in that period like Children of Bodom, Nile, Incantation, Morbid Angel, Iniquity, and possibly others I'm forgetting, but I wasn't digging into multiple full albums of material from them yet. Anyway, my best friend at the time had followed me through all the other guitar-centric rock and metal I'd been discovering, from Joe Satriani to Yngwie Malmsteen to Stratovarius, but he didn't have any interest in diving into the deep end of extreme metal like I did. So I think it was somewhere at that juncture that I felt pretty alone in that this music was uniquely "mine" out of my circle of friends and family.

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emax
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2019 6:17 am
Posts: 49
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2021 8:45 am 
 

I was a late 90s and early 2000s kid. Meaning my introduction to anything that could be categorized as metal was destined to start with overly downtuned guitars, turntables, beyond cringeworthy hairstyles, suburban gangbangers and inability to get over middle and high school relationships that went south.

Luckily I was musically curious enough that I went through the natural progression from Maiden and pre black album Metallica, which hit me at 14, the time when you just start learning what's actually worthwhile and what isn't, to Pantera and Slayer to then advancing to the extreme world va Cradle of Filth and Death. Those two were particularly helpful because they weren't so out there with the barrage of insane rythyms, complexity or rawness such that it sounded like construction machines to the uninitiated. The progression to death and black metal from there came pretty maturally, as did the fascination with what the bands from those scenes were known for outside the studio and stage. Emperor, Opeth, In Flames, Children of Bodom, Fear Factory, Suffocation, the progression was copletely natural. Looking around on metal radio would lead me to Blind Guardian, Rhapsody of Fire, Running Wild, Helloween, Savatage, Stratiovarius and all the rest from that scene; really, coming across one song from that group by chance (I forget which one) was enough to rell me in to that whole scene.

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gestapothrash
Metalhead

Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 4:55 am
Posts: 791
Location: The Land Down Under
PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2021 8:11 pm 
 

Hearing Judas Priest's Unleashed in the East and seeing a metal doco that showed a snippet of Venom playing Bloodlust. I was instantly hooked - it was so evil and morally dangerous that I couldn't not fall in love with it
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in_the_sign_of_metal
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jan 26, 2019 8:10 pm
Posts: 145
Location: Where the Sunrise Breaks the Darkness
PostPosted: Mon Jan 11, 2021 3:04 pm 
 

Oh man, there are a few such moments for me looking back now. One of the biggest would have to be when I was in middle school cross country and there was a kid there who had an old clunky iPod touch that would provide us entertainment on the way to and from meets. He only had a handful of songs from about 4-5 bands on it, but those were enough to get me hooked. I remember he had "Ronsenrot," "Sonne" and "Amerika" from Rammstein, "Blackwater Park" from Opeth and "Aces High" on that thing, and hearing those songs was one of the biggest catalysts for me becoming a rabid fanatic of this kind of music.

Fast forward a few years and I met another dude who was somewhat into metal, and we explored the music together, going to record shops and generally zoning out school related things to attend to what truly mattered: the riffs. Those were good days, and our attention was split pretty evenly between 70s hard rock, old school thrash, heavy metal and hair/glam metal. He was the one who introduced me to power metal, which in turn led to me diving down the rabbit hole of European metal in general. Eventually he would drift away from the it all, but that era of music and life was integral to reinforcing a love for the genre as a whole.

On a related note, even though I've become accustomed to them now, the elements that make extreme metal extreme were aspects of the music that I was comparatively very late in warming up to. Hell, there was a time I thought black album Metallica was "too heavy." But that moment of understanding the appeal of extreme metal was a major step towards an inerasable devotion to the music, so I'm glad I managed it.
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Y_owi_E
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Dec 09, 2020 9:51 pm
Posts: 36
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Mon Jan 11, 2021 8:04 pm 
 

A kid in grade 6 or 7 played "Poison" by Alice Cooper for show & tell and from that moment on it sparked something in me to look into heavier music and it's progressed from there.

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Crossbones
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Fri Aug 14, 2020 7:21 pm
Posts: 7
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2021 7:46 am 
 

I remember it clearly. Back in 2005, when I was 10 or so, I had a small mp3 player with about fifty songs that had been downloaded off of Limewire. A lot of it was techno or trance, which I enjoyed a lot back then. But for reasons that escape me to this day, I also had Bloodlust by Venom. When it came on, it was the scariest fucking thing, with that production making it sound like it was coming from the bowels of Hell and Chronos roaring about 'tearing the flesh of the weak, tender child'. It terrified me when I first heard it, but I soon warmed to it and after that I started getting into Iron Maiden, Metallica, Arch Enemy, Children of Bodom etc.

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Gemini 7 Rising
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Apr 04, 2013 1:08 am
Posts: 320
Location: United States
PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2021 6:29 pm 
 

Crossbones wrote:
I remember it clearly. Back in 2005, when I was 10 or so, I had a small mp3 player with about fifty songs that had been downloaded off of Limewire. A lot of it was techno or trance, which I enjoyed a lot back then. But for reasons that escape me to this day, I also had Bloodlust by Venom. When it came on, it was the scariest fucking thing, with that production making it sound like it was coming from the bowels of Hell and Chronos roaring about 'tearing the flesh of the weak, tender child'. It terrified me when I first heard it, but I soon warmed to it and after that I started getting into Iron Maiden, Metallica, Arch Enemy, Children of Bodom etc.


That's kinda great to, at 10 years old, go from techno/trance to "WTF? How did this get on there? And what IS it?" :lol: ...and then into becoming a full-fledged metal head :headbang:
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LithoJazzoSphere
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2020 8:11 pm
Posts: 1631
Location: United States
PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2021 6:39 pm 
 

Metal and electronic music initially went a bit hand in hand for me through my early exposure to some industrial rock/metal. By my mid-teens metal had far overtaken it, by my mid-20s electronic music had taken the lead, and now metal has been dominate for over a year again, though the electronic scene is still probably in second.

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DorchaSolas
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Fri Nov 13, 2020 12:44 pm
Posts: 23
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2021 1:42 pm 
 

There are a couple of 'moments' in my teens I can think of, but I was super late to the rock and metal bandwagon. Growing up in back arse of nowhere Ireland, with no other people meant lack of exposure in itself, then to-boot at the time, being dragged to Baptist Church every Sunday along with their youth groups ( read brainwashing ) where we were actively educated that to like rock and metal music was to worship Satan (obvs not cool with them), and that every time we listened we let the Devil in and made God cry ..... or something. I remember them showing a video of the church burnings in Norway, playing some Mayhem and some Metallica, with these American puritans going on about how super bad it all was (it sounded awesome!!) So now you've got the backstory(!) and can grasp that this made getting our hands on decent music harder still, so when we were old enough my brother would bootleg stuff - he had better access among his class mates.

I remember the day he brought home a Nightwish album, Ocecanborn, and man was I in raptures - hearing The Riddler, and Devil and the Deep Dark Ocean for this first time, the vocals and the keys, I'd never hear anything like it. We played it over and over, it's still my favourite album of theirs. Later, we got hold of some Iron Maiden, and well you can imagine! I get goosebumps every time I hear The Trooper because I still remember the first time my hair stood on end. I got to bring my brother to his first concert, to see them, when he as 15. Nothing can beat that kind of experience for utterly falling in love with metal - because exposure was so intermittent, I think that concert was the moment for me where it really sealed the deal, hearing who will forever be one of my favourite bands, live.

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soul_schizm
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2011 8:55 am
Posts: 693
Location: United States
PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2021 1:50 pm 
 

I'm going to show my age here. But when I was a teen and a friend dropped the needle on Screaming for Vengeance, from the very first note of The Hellion that was it for me. Never looked back. I still listen to a lot of different stuff from other genres, but metal became "home base" for me that day.

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Yuli Ban
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:07 am
Posts: 70
Location: United States
PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2021 2:05 pm 
 

I was born into it, I suppose. My dad— normally a hip-hop fan— was really into 90s alternative, classic rock, and some 80s heavy metal when I was born, so all throughout my infancy, I was surrounded by Black Sabbath, Nirvana, Soundgarden, Tool, Metallica, Rage Against the Machine, and whatnot just as much as I was Run DMC, Wu Tang Clan, A Tribe Called Quest, Beastie Boys, and so on. Naturally I fell in love with the former, especially the riffmasters of Sabbath, Soundgarden, and RATM. I'm sure I was only two or three when my dad let me watch a VHS of Metallica's "One" (when I was that young, I didn't understand metal culture and thought they were women for the longest time!)

My aunts still remember that I was a 4-year-old jumping on the couch screaming "You got a bullet in your head!" with a shirt over my head trying to replicate Zack de la Rocha's dreadlocks. It's the most adorable image of myself I can imagine, and I hope I did the final line too.

Eventually I heard stuff like Slayer and Megadeth, though I was coming of age in the middle of the Douche Age— so much of my experience there was formed by bands like System of a Down, Korn, Disturbed, Marilyn Manson, Ozzy's then-current albums, P.O.D., Drowning Pool, Linkin Park, Sum 41, Blink-182, AFI, etc. Now I still enjoy SOAD, I think a lot of people would agree they were standouts. And Rage Against the Machine was my favorite band growing up to an extreme extent (even though I didn't at all understand what they were talking about). So considering that I was molded by heavy music from a very early age, there is no "one" moment I can point to as a metal epiphany. Things simply evolved as I bought more CDs, discovered YouTube and got enough disposable income for iTunes, and recorded music from the radio (me doing that with a cheap mp3 player in 2009 gives me a sense of kinship with those doing it with 8-tracks in the '70s). Because I did the lattermost, I didn't even "miss" extreme metal— that's how I found the likes of Opeth, Equilibrium, and Necrodeath.


The single closest I can give would have to be May 27th, 2010 when I first discovered Electric Wizard. I had just discovered Saint Vitus and Acid King through some YouTube fuckery (there was a video of Acid King's "Heavy Load" but it was titled "Black Sabbath - Hand of Doom" with the album art for Paranoid for some bizarre reason), but hearing Electric Wizard was mindbending because up to that point, I was purely a "mainstream metal" fan, as in "knows only the big songs and whatever albums I had" of a few classic bands and mostly alternative metal/nü metal acts with some extreme metal acts on the side, as aforementioned. But otherwise anything that was fast (or at least up-tempo) and loud. As far as I knew, "sounds like Black Sabbath" meant something like Led Zeppelin and AC/DC, and though heavy for its time, Sabbath was clearly outpaced by what followed (literally) I never imagined you could be that heavy and still sound like you came from the early 70s. And even though I absolutely loved songs like Soundgarden's "4th of July", Rage Against the Machine's "Settle for Nothing," and Metallica's "Sad But True" from literal childhood, I somehow never thought that anyone other than Black Sabbath could make heavy rock and metal at a pace slower than 80 bpm, let alone as slow as I heard on Dopethrone. It's like the proverbial hunter-gatherer tribesman seeing a modern city for the first time. For a 15 year old, that was a big fuckin' deal. I'm sure if I had purchased Slipknot's Iowa any time before then, I'd have become a maggot. As it happened, The Wizard caught me off guard.

I say this is the closest to what captured me to metal because falling in love with Electric Wizard and, by extension, stoner/doom metal sent me looking back to the 1970s and 1960s to find rock bands I would have otherwise written off as being "too old-sounding" and "not heavy enough." That's probably why I fell in love with Cream's Disraeli Gears later that same year (though to be fair, that was another album my dad had when I was a kid, so it was also nostalgia driving that rediscovery). Because I'd actually tolerate old-sounding music, I wound up discovering my joy for proto-metal and proto-punk, which then sent me back to NWOBHM and thrash metal and also got me to look much more deeply into grunge rock beyond just the "angsty, pained, simplified" alternative veneer to realize that it was essentially just an alt-tinged variant of stoner rock.

I strongly doubt this would've happened without Electric Wizard (a band I mostly follow for the grindhouse movie recommendations nowadays, sadly). The thing is, though, I was already a big fan of heavy metal before then and WAS actually looking for more stuff to listen to beyond just the mainsteam and top-ends of the underground (that's the whole reason I found them), so I don't think it counts perfectly.

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