Encyclopaedia Metallum: The Metal Archives

Message board

* FAQ    * Register   * Login 



Reply to topic
Author Message Previous topic | Next topic
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 1:18 pm 
 

Opus wrote:
Zelkiiro wrote:
It is if you don't like black or death metal, it often feels like.

https://www.youtube.com/c/NWOTHMFullAlbums
New wave of traditional heavy metal, occasionally power metal.

https://www.youtube.com/c/MetalMusicFro ... TheWorldYT
Mostly power metal and power/prog.

Get back to me once you have sat through these channels.
It's a world of metal out there!


If I was good to play I'd liked to join in the New Wave of Traditonal Heavy Metal.

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 1:25 pm 
 

goetia_unreleased wrote:
As long as younger people continue to develop an interest in heavy/extreme music metal will never die.


if the music doesn't evolve it dies.

We still remember Jimi Hendrix after 51 years after his death, but there isn't any Hendrix rock genre. Therefore he remains in music history books and in our LPs collection.

If someone in 50 years from now, after 100 years the first Black Sabbath album, will copy the same style it will look ridiculous.

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 1:27 pm 
 

Hexenmacht46290 wrote:
Step 1. Turn off the radio.

They only play five finger death punch, and other butt rock. There are some stations, that have metal focused shows, yes, these are an exception. I, personally, am shocked to hear people talking about having heard Iron Maiden or Motörhead on the radio, because radio around here wouldn’t think of it. The local NHL team/rock radio station plays wuss rock. They don’t even play Judas Priest, because it’s too homosexual and satanic for them! If they play metal, it’s just going to be one Metallica song(enter sandman), one Deep Purple song(smoke on the water), one Black Sabbath song...and maybe some mallcore. I went to my credit union last week, to cash the check, from taking my car to a scrapyard, and the tellers were playing the local “soft rock” station. I used to hear that, at a dishwashing job, back in 2012. It sucks, it’s for people who aren’t really into music, and want no variety, and nothing interesting. It filled me with disgust, that such repulsive trash exists, and idiots keep it making money. Don’t let mainstream/payola tell you that there’s nothing else out there.

Step 2. Seek it out yourself.

Go on Bandcamp and YouTube. Find stuff you like. When shows start again, you might get a chance to see some of these bands live. Even mediocre bands, that are far from the quality of the classics, can put on a fun, exciting show. And if you look around, there are some good, and great modern bands. Mainstream normies might have greater numbers, united, in their shitty taste in music, but they won’t have as much fun as you.


I never listen to the radio. I don't watch TV!
I always searched music on Youtube, Metallum, etc... never in mainstream.

Top
 Profile  
Kalaratri
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Aug 05, 2020 3:22 pm
Posts: 979
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 1:31 pm 
 

Bertuccia wrote:
goetia_unreleased wrote:
As long as younger people continue to develop an interest in heavy/extreme music metal will never die.


if the music doesn't evolve it dies.

We still remember Jimi Hendrix after 51 years after his death, but there isn't any Hendrix rock genre. Therefore he remains in music history books and in our LPs collection.

If someone in 50 years from now, after 100 years the first Black Sabbath album, will copy the same style it will look ridiculous.


To me this is a strange view of what people actually care about when it comes to music, wrapped up in an odd obsession with "originality". All music is simply borne of musicians taking influences from music that came before and using them to construct something that didn't previously exist, or to put their own spin on an existing sound. Bands are still doing that. Who cares if the sources of their inspiration have been around for decades? Listeners care far more about whether the music resonates with them, not whether it's some wholly original piece of art that has never been seen before in the history of mankind. When I listen to a band I don't really care about the bands they're influenced by (even if I can oftentimes hear the influences), I just care if the album or song I'm listening to is good. Music doesn't need to constantly reinvent the wheel for listeners to enjoy it, and no one will care if a band 100 years in the future sounds like Black Sabbath. If someone likes the material that said hypothetical band puts out, then they'll listen to it and presumably support them. There is no expiration date on good music.

Also there was no "Hendrix rock genre" to begin with. Hendrix was very much a part of the genesis of psychedelic and acid rock and a quick visit to Bandcamp will show that there are still bands today playing those styles and trying to build on the foundations he laid down.

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 1:41 pm 
 

Gravetemplar wrote:
caspian wrote:
Whether we want to admit it or not it's kinda fair to say that a big impetus for genres and new bands etc is the idea of getting laid, and unless if a slightly unwashed 40 year oldin a leather jacket is your idea of the perfect lay, then if you're an 18 year old you're likely to get into something else. You are far, far more likely to find a 40 something dude into metal than a 15 year old, which is fairly bad news.

Please, someone tell me this is satire.


this is the reality

Top
 Profile  
Kalaratri
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Aug 05, 2020 3:22 pm
Posts: 979
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 1:46 pm 
 

Bertuccia wrote:
Gravetemplar wrote:
caspian wrote:
Whether we want to admit it or not it's kinda fair to say that a big impetus for genres and new bands etc is the idea of getting laid, and unless if a slightly unwashed 40 year oldin a leather jacket is your idea of the perfect lay, then if you're an 18 year old you're likely to get into something else. You are far, far more likely to find a 40 something dude into metal than a 15 year old, which is fairly bad news.

Please, someone tell me this is satire.


this is the reality


Nah, the idea that people form bands to get laid is a pretty shallow, out-of-touch take to be honest. That's not the sort of motivation that will keep any band going, especially once they find out that the reality of touring is far from the glamorous adventure it's sometimes presented as. Plus actually spending the time to get good at your instrument and become a skilled songwriter is a far less efficient use of your time if your goal is to hook up with someone in this dating app obsessed day and age.

Also, as people have previously mentioned, younger people are still getting into metal and many older, veteran bands are seeing their audiences get younger. So I wouldn't even say that the lack of young people into metal is a true fact.


Last edited by Kalaratri on Fri May 14, 2021 1:49 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 1:48 pm 
 

cultofkraken wrote:
Look at those numbers for Cannibal Corpse’s new album and I can say it ain’t dying.


I can try to listen those albums, but I remember that I don't liked them.

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 1:52 pm 
 

LithoJazzoSphere wrote:
I have to say that I'm more concerned than most. I'm not so sure metal remaining an elite clique that you have to search out to get into bodes well for the future. At least in the US there isn't much distorted electric guitar presence in the mainstream. Without some kind of on-ramp to metal I worry that fans will dry up at some point as metal becomes an increasingly niche interest. The two primary remaining paths are country-rock, which tends to be a different route altogether, and classic rock, which is often dismissed as "dad rock" by younger generations.


the lack of fans isn't the only and the main problem.
My fear is that I can't find nothing of NEW and ORIGINAL music to listen.
I see only copies, of Iron Maiden, of Thrash metal, of Djent, etc... No original stuff.

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 1:53 pm 
 

Acrobat wrote:
caspian wrote:
You are far, far more likely to find a 40 something dude into metal than a 15 year old, which is fairly bad news


We could say the same thing about Christianity. Is that dying, too? :D


Yes. All religions are dying.

Top
 Profile  
Kalaratri
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Aug 05, 2020 3:22 pm
Posts: 979
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 2:26 pm 
 

Bertuccia wrote:
LithoJazzoSphere wrote:
I have to say that I'm more concerned than most. I'm not so sure metal remaining an elite clique that you have to search out to get into bodes well for the future. At least in the US there isn't much distorted electric guitar presence in the mainstream. Without some kind of on-ramp to metal I worry that fans will dry up at some point as metal becomes an increasingly niche interest. The two primary remaining paths are country-rock, which tends to be a different route altogether, and classic rock, which is often dismissed as "dad rock" by younger generations.


the lack of fans isn't the only and the main problem.
My fear is that I can't find nothing of NEW and ORIGINAL music to listen.
I see only copies, of Iron Maiden, of Thrash metal, of Djent, etc... No original stuff.


There have been a ton of developments in subgenres like black metal (i.e. blackgaze/post-black metal, the dissonant black metal sound of Deathspell Omega and bands influenced by them etc.) since the early 2000s. That might not be your bag musically, but they exist nonetheless. Also like I mentioned before, people care far less about originality than you seem to think they do.

Anyway, to give one example of a band that's doing something pretty unique:


Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 3:00 pm 
 

Hexenmacht46290 wrote:
I was born in the early 90s, and I got into metal in the late 2000s. I wasn’t “raised on classic rock,” like a lot of people, because my parents didn’t play any of it.

Some kid I hung out and smoked weed with, before class, had fucking Slayer, Metallica, Death, and Kreator shirts. I was young, and I knew I didn’t want to listen to mainstream shit, and he had shirts with cool, tough, blasphemous imagery. I asked him about Cannibal Corpse, and other bands with edgelord lyrics, because I thought it was funny. He told me, that when I got home, I should get on YouTube, and look up Dying Fetus’ “kill your mother/rape your dog. I was a blank slate, pretty much, I wasn’t into any music, because, listening to music wasn’t something I had actually cared about before. I was looking for entertainment, and I found it.

I had just recently gotten access to internet that wasn’t 56k dialup, and had looked up some thrash and death metal, but Dying Fetus was the first band I ever got into. I didn’t even get into Black Sabbath, until one of my good friends showed me Electric Wizard, then I got into sabbath, then when I first listened to a Jimi Hendrix album(not just the hit singles), I thought, “this sounds like Black Sabbath.”

I got into metal from illegal downloading, not mainstream rock/metal. Now, I download on Bandcamp. The point is, people have freedom, to listen to whatever now. Over a decade ago, I knew a lot less about music, but I made cringey Facebook posts about how bad Justin Bieber is. Now? I wouldn’t be able to tell you what’s popular. I know it’s something that sucks, because, some stores I walk into play something resembling what I’ve heard is “the thing.”

But the truth is, the most popular music, is like a prime minister, in a coalition government, in a parliamentary system. It’s like how Guinness claims to be the world’s biggest brewery. It is, or was, but it just happened to be the biggest. Doesn’t change the fact that the vast majority of the worlds beer is Pilsner, and most people don’t even know stout exists.

Be the change you wish to see.
It’s up to metal bands, to put out good albums, and put on shows, that kick ass. Will metal “die,” though? Like jazz? I don’t think so, and here’s why.

If you think metal elitists are bad...count yourself lucky, you haven’t met a jazz elitist. My mom’s brother is one of these. He hates pretty much everything. He makes money, doing sound technician stuff, and playing music, for corporate crap, which he hates, and he looks down on everything, that isn’t some pretentious asshole jazz.

Why isn’t there a scene, with dedicated fans, he could play shows for, even if it’s just a US tour, in clubs and bars? Because, his genre stamped out fun. Most jazz musicians I’ve met, want to play in an orchestra, to make money, and don’t get together, and have fun, writing songs. They do asshole things, like busking, on streets with tourists, playing saxophones, playing pretentious stuff, that sucks. They do it, because their “inferiors” “need” to be “educated.” Musically, they are like teenagers, at guitar center, showing off their Malmsteen impressions, or their Zakk Wylde/Dimebag Darrell impressions. In attitude, they are like ANUSites. Once rock replaced it, on the top of the charts, the posers went on to whatever made money, and the elitists were so offended, that they became too elitist, and killed off their genre. When I listen to new music, looking for a new experience, jazz isn’t even something I consider, because, I’ve met the assholes that like it. I grew up around them. No.

Keep metal fun. That way, it can never die. It’ll never be mainstream again, but why would you want that? Why be popular, when you can be good? Just don’t get too elitist, because it’s supposed to actually be entertainment(which you can still combine with a serious message).


I like also jazz music. I've tried to learn also jazz music. I've met good jazz musicians and rock musicians that after studied jazz improved their rock music.
They aren't mainstream or elitarist or else. They are expert musicians that plays in dirty rooms with all the music passionates.

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 3:13 pm 
 

Red_Death wrote:
Hexenmacht46290 wrote:
Once rock replaced it, on the top of the charts, the posers went on to whatever made money, and the elitists were so offended, that they became too elitist, and killed off their genre.

Just out of curiosity, what does killing off a genre/the death of a genre mean to you?

I mean, the little off the entire jazz tradition I listened to (mostly newer but with some classics like Mingus and Miles) was insanely diverse (and very often good and entertaining), leading me to make parallels with metal re: niches. I mean, I consider the collaboration album of Erik Truffaz and Murcof (an electronica/ambient artist), Being Human Being, a jazz album...kind-of, maybe-jazz? The entire so-called dark jazz "scene" was my gateway in the first place. And there's so much cool stuff, different in vibe and technique, though it may be explorer's enthusiasm with little to no quality control on my part.

I guess I just don't see these death-stories as anything other than a common myth, unless it's backed up with figures and data having to do with some relevant categories.


For me, the death of a genre is when there isn't any original song, but only stereotypes... for example traditional heavy is a plagiarism of Iron Maiden, expecially after 80s... thrash metal rips off Metallica's and Megadeth's riff...
doesn't exist any true new song.
And today doesn't exist any new metal subgenre, we can't neither to invent a new style.
In fact metal evolved in a lot of subgenres, otherwise was impossible to think new stuff...
Now EVERY heavy metal subgenre is slack.

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 3:23 pm 
 

Saanen wrote:
Metal isn't dying, not even close. It's evolving, just as the rest of the music world is. You don't even have to dig very hard to find an incredible variety of new bands that don't sound anywhere near the same but are all obviously metal. Sure, if you want clones of the same old bands you grew up with, it's thin pickings, but if you're that stuck in a rut then you might as well just listen to the music you already know. That sounds pretty boring to me, though.

I've been listening to metal for over 30 years (holy crap, how did I get so old?), since before I even knew what the genre was called. I haven't been this excited about music in decades! In my case, I'm all over folk metal and can't get enough of it after hearing The Hu for the first time in early 2020 (I was supposed to see them live last May...), so you can call them my re-onramp band.

Seriously, when I first got into metal, Metallica was still a new band and I was as deep in the scene as I could be pre-internet when I lived in the sticks. These days things feel even fresher than they did back then. It's also a lot easier to find new music.


Can you suggest me some band that is worth to listen? I always liked all the subgenres except doom metal. I love folk metal, brutal death, traditional heavy, progressive, grindcore but the old band tired me out, except some songs. I'm finding something really new, but really metal.

Top
 Profile  
Kalaratri
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Aug 05, 2020 3:22 pm
Posts: 979
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 3:35 pm 
 

Bertuccia wrote:
Red_Death wrote:
Hexenmacht46290 wrote:
Once rock replaced it, on the top of the charts, the posers went on to whatever made money, and the elitists were so offended, that they became too elitist, and killed off their genre.

Just out of curiosity, what does killing off a genre/the death of a genre mean to you?

I mean, the little off the entire jazz tradition I listened to (mostly newer but with some classics like Mingus and Miles) was insanely diverse (and very often good and entertaining), leading me to make parallels with metal re: niches. I mean, I consider the collaboration album of Erik Truffaz and Murcof (an electronica/ambient artist), Being Human Being, a jazz album...kind-of, maybe-jazz? The entire so-called dark jazz "scene" was my gateway in the first place. And there's so much cool stuff, different in vibe and technique, though it may be explorer's enthusiasm with little to no quality control on my part.

I guess I just don't see these death-stories as anything other than a common myth, unless it's backed up with figures and data having to do with some relevant categories.


For me, the death of a genre is when there isn't any original song, but only stereotypes... for example traditional heavy is a plagiarism of Iron Maiden, expecially after 80s... thrash metal rips off Metallica's and Megadeth's riff...
doesn't exist any true new song.


Yeah, you're pretty much wrong here. Traditional heavy metal is far from bands just aping Iron Maiden, that's a pretty ignorant take and ignores the legacy of bands like Manilla Road, Candlemass, and countless others who have directly inspired the new wave of traditional heavy metal and doom metal bands. Metallica and Megadeth were never the be-all and end-all thrash, and there are tons of bands taking influence from everything from the technical/prog thrash of Voivod and Coroner to Teutonic thrash like Destruction and Sodom to brutal borderline death/thrash like early Sepultura, Demolition Hammer, and Sadus. Bands combine those influences in different ways to achieve different results.


Last edited by Kalaratri on Fri May 14, 2021 3:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 3:43 pm 
 

Yuli Ban wrote:
In terms of rock music's decline into something like jazz, I put it this way a while back:

Imagine it's 1994 and you're excited by the new Black Sabbath album as an example that rock and roll is alive again. Is Black Sabbath cool? Obviously. But why are you pointing to a 25 year old band as an example that rock is alive and kicking and not any of the newer acts like Pearl Jam or Soundgarden or Korn or Green Day or Pantera? We were getting interesting and massive releases from multiple different regions in America alone, let alone Europe or Japan. If the Rolling Stones, Meatloaf, Rush, Black Sabbath, and whatnot were the only major "rock" bands in the mainstream circa 1994 (no subgenre specifically, any guitar driven group) and the wave of bands popular in the last five years plus up and coming acts that would achieve popularity in the next five/ten weren't there or were trapped deep in the underground, we'd absolutely consider have said "time to pull the plug on the genre."

It was a rolling life-cycle going back to the 1950s. The rock artists that were big in 1960 were the big names from 1955 with new groups and acts popping up as well; the big artists and up-and-comers had shifted by 1965, and then again by 1970, and then again by 1975, all the way up to around 2010-2015 when the genre and its many subgenres largely stagnated. The names that were big in the 2000s remain big today. This is also true for pop and various genres like hip hop/trap and electronic music, with the caveat that there are still massive new names striking it rich in these genres too. The state of rap music circa 2010 wasn't the same as it was in 2005 or 2015 or 2020. There are clearly still scenes and superstars there. What's true for rock music isn't true universally.

I'm glad people started mentioning the age of the artists playing metal; I thought I was going insane with it, but for years I've noticed that a lot of hard rock and metal bands feel like they're fronted by people's dads and that the average age of any band has creeped up into the 30s and 40s. The cold fact is that people tend to gravitate towards those who look like them, and thus kids are most interested in other kids. Watching your parents rock out on stage is either the coolest thing ever or horrifyingly embarrassing, but watching someone around your age (or at least in your age bracket) rock out is so badass that it might inspire you to start playing a guitar too. There seems to be less of that in metal recently, save for maybe bedroom black metal groups that obviously aren't going to achieve wider appeal to begin with.

And for rock, metal, punk, and whatnot, if you have to point to bands that are 10, 20, 30, 40, even 50 years old as an example of a genre still being alive, then that genre probably isn't as healthy as you might think it is. It's the latest thing I've seen, of rock fans pointing to new releases and tours from decades-old bands to say "rock is alive, perhaps even doing better than it has in years." I'm not saying it's a bad thing that these old groups are keeping their flame going; it IS great to see old'uns rocking out. But without that new blood, the party won't last forever.

It's Children of Men but for rock music. Grown men can play on the swings all they want; there still aren't any kids being born.

It's fine that the genre isn't what it once was. All things have their time, and keeping that fire burning is up to you.


depends on the QUALITY of those bands...

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 3:49 pm 
 

Kalaratri wrote:
tomcat_ha wrote:
We will have to wait and see what the lasting impact of covid will be but we can make a strong argument that the last 15 years have been the true golden age of metal. As many big festivals as ever, a gargantuan number of releases loads of bands touring across the globe. The difference is that its all spread out over more bands and indeed the average age is only going up.

I think the development of metal overall is quite similar to the lifespan of the average person. Metal right now is in its early 40s which is also past the prime for most people in terms of pushing their own creative boundaries they tend to be quite developed and skilled at what they are doing at that age. The real decline of metal is perhaps on the horizon and it might have been brought forward by covid we shall see.


If you consider the first Black Sabbath full length to be the genesis of metal proper, it's actually 50 years old. In any case, I don't think it really works that way. Musical genres are not people. By your logic hip hop should also be past its prime since it's around 40 years old now, but if anything it's more popular than ever.


hip hop is loved by people that doesn't know his history... and they focus on lyrics and not on music...

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 3:50 pm 
 

Gravetemplar wrote:
It's weird to say metal is dying when there's more metal being recorded now than ever.


quantity is not quality

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 3:55 pm 
 

Boychev wrote:
The problem with pronouncing a genre "dead" when it's still being played and listened to by a fairly big audience is that the assumption to me seems to be that the only valid form of existence for an artform is to have a youth culture attached to it. Metal's probably getting older - both the audience and the musicians - but I don't see how that makes it "dead" when there is still a mass of people willing to listen to it and learn to play it. Like yeah, probably in 20-30 years there won't be any teenagers who listen to Black Sabbath but who cares what teenagers listen to? It probably means that it won't survive on the market, but the market is not the only way to support musicians - neither classical nor jazz music survive on the market, but there are still plenty of schools, ensembles, festivals, concert halls, etc out there. Unlike those genres, metal is not likely to receive public grants, but also unlike those genres it's viable to learn to play, compose, and record metal entirely on one's own especially given how cheap decent instruments are nowadays and how ubiquitous information is on the Internet - not to mention how you don't need a label to support you in order to record and release an album. I don't see why a future consisting of a sea of small bands with dedicated fans is necessarily a bad thing. It just means that there might be less concerts on big stadiums and less glossy entry-level bands for the kids.


the problem isn't the audience, is the quality of the composition of the music.

Top
 Profile  
Curious_dead
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Sep 20, 2006 12:13 pm
Posts: 672
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 3:59 pm 
 

Bertuccia wrote:
Gravetemplar wrote:
It's weird to say metal is dying when there's more metal being recorded now than ever.


quantity is not quality


But quality is highly subjective. For instance, I tend to prefer younger bands, or "middle-age" bands, than the old ones. Metal today is more varied than it was before. Probably, a lot of the new bands are mediocre, or start out as such, but there are legions of bands.

And quality isn't the defining thing about the "death" of a genre. As long as bands and artists keep publishing new music, as long as fans listen to those songs, as long as people gather to watch a music show, headbang in groups, it's not really possible to claim something is dead. Even if you, personally, hate or don't care about the songs they are listening to, however derivative you find them (and tbh I think you put too much emphasis on originality, yet are weirdly claiming things like all trash metal bands sound like Metallica... which is demonstrably false).

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 4:00 pm 
 

Keith 777 wrote:
It will never die, as it doesn't need the oxygen of publicity to survive .
Metal is totally self sufficient.


metal needs new original composition

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 4:06 pm 
 

Turok12 wrote:
Boychev wrote:
The problem with pronouncing a genre "dead"


Thread title says DYING not dead. :-P :-D


I've tried to be a bit optimistic.

Top
 Profile  
Kalaratri
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Aug 05, 2020 3:22 pm
Posts: 979
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 4:08 pm 
 

Curious_dead wrote:
Bertuccia wrote:
Gravetemplar wrote:
It's weird to say metal is dying when there's more metal being recorded now than ever.


quantity is not quality


But quality is highly subjective. For instance, I tend to prefer younger bands, or "middle-age" bands, than the old ones. Metal today is more varied than it was before. Probably, a lot of the new bands are mediocre, or start out as such, but there are legions of bands.


This has always been the case. To assume otherwise is to look at the world through rose-colored nostalgia goggles. There were tons of mediocre bands (however you define that term, which is subjective anyway) back in whatever time period you'd care to name. The only difference is that it's much easier to get your music out there now so more people have the opportunity to listen to it and deem it mediocre if it doesn't jive with them or whatever. People talk about golden ages, but the reality is that everyone only remembers the albums that got universally praised and forget about all of the middle of the road stuff you'd have to wade through to get to them.


Last edited by Kalaratri on Fri May 14, 2021 4:12 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 4:09 pm 
 

DangerousGraveyard wrote:
The reality is that people listen to heavy metal, that's for sure, but mostly old granpa bands. And their glory may be eternal, but their holograms won't be offering new music in the future.

There are plenty of new bands of YOUNG people. Too many. That's another reality: most bands suck so bad that it's hard to put any intention to listen or discover new names, but that also harms awesome young acts that truly deserve attention and could have a bright future if someone decided to buy their bundle on Bandcamp, including a CD + t-shirt + sticker + badge + her mommas panties + cookies + used strings + laundry service and a ride home for 20$ instead of the new fucking Big Band reissue for 70€.

Technology allows more releases, but it also decreases the quality of the albums: no good sound, no originality and definitely no good artworks. Fast food bands. Those are a fucking cancer... guys that decide one day to put together a terrible speed metal band, prepare everything with all the cliches and release it in 2 days, and they have enough friends to "steal the attention" from the good bands that are worthy. Or overrated products with talentless people, like Eternal Champion, with a vocalist with the voice of a deaf old dog having a brain seizure.

Same goes for those fast food labels that are popping out everywhere: Greedy bastards that put out the most awful bands just because some member is a friend or because they need to fill a catalog, and then they don't move those bands at all and put another stone on those band's grave.


In fact that shows as heavy metal is dead even if there are a lot of bands... all the songs are cliches.

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 4:17 pm 
 

Kalaratri wrote:
Bertuccia wrote:
goetia_unreleased wrote:
As long as younger people continue to develop an interest in heavy/extreme music metal will never die.


if the music doesn't evolve it dies.

We still remember Jimi Hendrix after 51 years after his death, but there isn't any Hendrix rock genre. Therefore he remains in music history books and in our LPs collection.

If someone in 50 years from now, after 100 years the first Black Sabbath album, will copy the same style it will look ridiculous.


To me this is a strange view of what people actually care about when it comes to music, wrapped up in an odd obsession with "originality". All music is simply borne of musicians taking influences from music that came before and using them to construct something that didn't previously exist, or to put their own spin on an existing sound. Bands are still doing that. Who cares if the sources of their inspiration have been around for decades? Listeners care far more about whether the music resonates with them, not whether it's some wholly original piece of art that has never been seen before in the history of mankind. When I listen to a band I don't really care about the bands they're influenced by (even if I can oftentimes hear the influences), I just care if the album or song I'm listening to is good. Music doesn't need to constantly reinvent the wheel for listeners to enjoy it, and no one will care if a band 100 years in the future sounds like Black Sabbath. If someone likes the material that said hypothetical band puts out, then they'll listen to it and presumably support them. There is no expiration date on good music.

Also there was no "Hendrix rock genre" to begin with. Hendrix was very much a part of the genesis of psychedelic and acid rock and a quick visit to Bandcamp will show that there are still bands today playing those styles and trying to build on the foundations he laid down.


Ok, all of you made me curious about Bandcamp. I always searched music here or on Youtube.

I know that all musicians has influences, but if still exists Led Zeppelin, why should I listen Greta Van Fleet?

Top
 Profile  
Curious_dead
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Sep 20, 2006 12:13 pm
Posts: 672
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 4:27 pm 
 

Bertuccia wrote:
I know that all musicians has influences, but if still exists Led Zeppelin, why should I listen Greta Van Fleet?


That's a weird question. A better question would be: why the fuck not?

I listened so much to Emperor that I got bored; "Emperor-like" songs bring something new, I don't know every movement or chorus or riff by heart.

Top
 Profile  
Kalaratri
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Aug 05, 2020 3:22 pm
Posts: 979
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 4:30 pm 
 

Bertuccia wrote:
Ok, all of you made me curious about Bandcamp. I always searched music here or on Youtube.
I know that all musicians has influences, but if still exists Led Zeppelin, why should I listen Greta Van Fleet?


This is again, a very strange way of viewing music. The existence of one band doesn't suddenly invalidate the existence of another band with a similar sound. You know it's possible for people to like both Led Zeppelin and Greta Van Fleet because they like the songs both bands write and their music clicks with them, right? Who cares if Greta sounds like Zeppelin, if I have an emotional connection with their music and it enriches my life in some way then I couldn't care less if they sound like them. Hell, I'm sure there are kids who got into Greta Van Fleet who also checked out Led Zeppelin after hearing others make comparisons and prefer GVF to Zep.

To give another example, I'm a fan of the Swedish band Lik, who clearly take their influences from 90s Swedish death metal like Entombed and Dismember. They don't make any attempt to hide it at all. If you played one of their albums for me and told me it was a lost Dismember record I would honestly believe you. But I don't care at all that they're not "original" because they write catchy, aggressive, hook-laden songs that are a ton of fun to jam when I'm driving or going for a walk or on any occasion really. That's all I need or want from their music, and many, many people approach music in that way. Bands just need to write songs that people can connect with. Ultimately that's what really matters, not whether the music they're making is groundbreaking or ahead of its time. This hyper-focus on "originality" you have is not anchored to any sort of reality in terms of how people consume music and what they primarily care about, and it doesn't really have any bearing on whether a genre is alive or dead.


Last edited by Kalaratri on Fri May 14, 2021 4:40 pm, edited 4 times in total.
Top
 Profile  
Twisted_Psychology
Metal freak

Joined: Sat May 16, 2009 8:22 pm
Posts: 5472
Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 4:32 pm 
 

Kalaratri wrote:
To me this is a strange view of what people actually care about when it comes to music, wrapped up in an odd obsession with "originality". All music is simply borne of musicians taking influences from music that came before and using them to construct something that didn't previously exist, or to put their own spin on an existing sound. Bands are still doing that. Who cares if the sources of their inspiration have been around for decades? Listeners care far more about whether the music resonates with them, not whether it's some wholly original piece of art that has never been seen before in the history of mankind. When I listen to a band I don't really care about the bands they're influenced by (even if I can oftentimes hear the influences), I just care if the album or song I'm listening to is good. Music doesn't need to constantly reinvent the wheel for listeners to enjoy it, and no one will care if a band 100 years in the future sounds like Black Sabbath. If someone likes the material that said hypothetical band puts out, then they'll listen to it and presumably support them. There is no expiration date on good music.

Also there was no "Hendrix rock genre" to begin with. Hendrix was very much a part of the genesis of psychedelic and acid rock and a quick visit to Bandcamp will show that there are still bands today playing those styles and trying to build on the foundations he laid down.


This is pretty much where I'm at with it. For a genre that consists almost exclusively of musicians playing to other musicians, you would think that metalheads would have a better understanding of the creative process. All art is driven by the need to create regardless of "originality" and most artists don't think that far one way or another. No art form can die when people are still driven to make it.
_________________
Christopher Steve (Doom Folk/Americana): http://christophersteve.bandcamp.com/
Lavaborne (Power Doom): https://lavaborne.bandcamp.com
Spirit Division (Stoner Doom): http://spiritdivision.bandcamp.com

Top
 Profile  
CrippledLucifer
Metalhead

Joined: Tue May 27, 2008 5:08 am
Posts: 669
Location: Denmark
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 5:07 pm 
 

Guys you don't seem to be getting it but according to the last page and a half of this thread metal is dying and so are religions and in fact all existence is slowly dying as we ultimately approach the heat death of the universe, so why bother with metal since in fact there has been absolutely no kinds of new and original music whatsoever in the last 50 years.
_________________
I_Crash_and_Burn wrote:
This is filth

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 5:11 pm 
 

[/quote]

Yeah, you're pretty much wrong here. Traditional heavy metal is far from bands just aping Iron Maiden, that's a pretty ignorant take and ignores the legacy of bands like Manilla Road, Candlemass, and countless others who have directly inspired the new wave of traditional heavy metal and doom metal bands. Metallica and Megadeth were never the be-all and end-all thrash, and there are tons of bands taking influence from everything from the technical/prog thrash of Voivod and Coroner to Teutonic thrash like Destruction and Sodom to brutal borderline death/thrash like early Sepultura, Demolition Hammer, and Sadus. Bands combine those influences in different ways to achieve different results.[/quote]

In 80s there were interesting band. But now, a trad heavy band is a plagiarism of Irons or similar, a thrash metal band is a plagiarism of big four or teutonic thrash bands.

I have a lot of care about originality, otherwise I listen to big four instead a new thrash copypaste band.

I know it because studying music on the guitar is very hard to compose a good melody.

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 5:12 pm 
 

CrippledLucifer wrote:
Guys you don't seem to be getting it but according to the last page and a half of this thread metal is dying and so are religions and in fact all existence is slowly dying as we ultimately approach the heat death of the universe, so why bother with metal since in fact there has been absolutely no kinds of new and original music whatsoever in the last 50 years.


yes. This is the true problem. Everything is gonna die. As I said in the main post.

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 5:15 pm 
 

Kalaratri wrote:
Bertuccia wrote:
Ok, all of you made me curious about Bandcamp. I always searched music here or on Youtube.
I know that all musicians has influences, but if still exists Led Zeppelin, why should I listen Greta Van Fleet?


This is again, a very strange way of viewing music. The existence of one band doesn't suddenly invalidate the existence of another band with a similar sound. You know it's possible for people to like both Led Zeppelin and Greta Van Fleet because they like the songs both bands write and their music clicks with them, right? Who cares if Greta sounds like Zeppelin, if I have an emotional connection with their music and it enriches my life in some way then I couldn't care less if they sound like them. Hell, I'm sure there are kids who got into Greta Van Fleet who also checked out Led Zeppelin after hearing others make comparisons and prefer GVF to Zep.

To give another example, I'm a fan of the Swedish band Lik, who clearly take their influences from 90s Swedish death metal like Entombed and Dismember. They don't make any attempt to hide it at all. If you played one of their albums for me and told me it was a lost Dismember record I would honestly believe you. But I don't care at all that they're not "original" because they write catchy, aggressive, hook-laden songs that are a ton of fun to jam when I'm driving or going for a walk or on any occasion really. That's all I need or want from their music, and many, many people approach music in that way. Bands just need to write songs that people can connect with. Ultimately that's what really matters, not whether the music they're making is groundbreaking or ahead of its time. This hyper-focus on "originality" you have is not anchored to any sort of reality in terms of how people consume music and what they primarily care about, and it doesn't really have any bearing on whether a genre is alive or dead.


why is it strange? Creativity implies originality.

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 5:17 pm 
 

Curious_dead wrote:
Bertuccia wrote:
I know that all musicians has influences, but if still exists Led Zeppelin, why should I listen Greta Van Fleet?


That's a weird question. A better question would be: why the fuck not?

I listened so much to Emperor that I got bored; "Emperor-like" songs bring something new, I don't know every movement or chorus or riff by heart.


Emperor-like songs aren't new. If Emperor got bored you, therefore also Emperor-like songs should get bored you

Top
 Profile  
Curious_dead
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Sep 20, 2006 12:13 pm
Posts: 672
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 5:20 pm 
 

Bertuccia wrote:

In 80s there were interesting band. But now, a trad heavy band is a plagiarism of Irons or similar, a thrash metal band is a plagiarism of big four or teutonic thrash bands.



I don't think you understand what plagiarism is.

Even bands that do resemble their predecessors (which is far from the majority in any given genre, if you actually listened to them) often have interesting songs.

But at this point, I think you've entrenched yourself in your side of the argument, so I don't see how this discussion is ever gonna be fruitful. If you wanna believe that all modern trash plagiarizes Metallica, it's your prerogative, but you won't find many people agreeing with you...

Top
 Profile  
Kalaratri
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Aug 05, 2020 3:22 pm
Posts: 979
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 5:29 pm 
 

Bertuccia wrote:

In 80s there were interesting band. But now, a trad heavy band is a plagiarism of Irons or similar, a thrash metal band is a plagiarism of big four or teutonic thrash bands.

I have a lot of care about originality, otherwise I listen to big four instead a new thrash copypaste band.

I know it because studying music on the guitar is very hard to compose a good melody.


If you think these bands sound like straight copies of Iron Maiden I find it hard to believe you're living in the same universe as me:







Or that these guys just sound like a band aping Metallica and a bunch of German thrash bands, for that matter.



Last edited by Kalaratri on Fri May 14, 2021 6:22 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Top
 Profile  
Kalaratri
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Aug 05, 2020 3:22 pm
Posts: 979
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 5:43 pm 
 

Bertuccia wrote:
Kalaratri wrote:
Bertuccia wrote:
Ok, all of you made me curious about Bandcamp. I always searched music here or on Youtube.
I know that all musicians has influences, but if still exists Led Zeppelin, why should I listen Greta Van Fleet?


This is again, a very strange way of viewing music. The existence of one band doesn't suddenly invalidate the existence of another band with a similar sound. You know it's possible for people to like both Led Zeppelin and Greta Van Fleet because they like the songs both bands write and their music clicks with them, right? Who cares if Greta sounds like Zeppelin, if I have an emotional connection with their music and it enriches my life in some way then I couldn't care less if they sound like them. Hell, I'm sure there are kids who got into Greta Van Fleet who also checked out Led Zeppelin after hearing others make comparisons and prefer GVF to Zep.

To give another example, I'm a fan of the Swedish band Lik, who clearly take their influences from 90s Swedish death metal like Entombed and Dismember. They don't make any attempt to hide it at all. If you played one of their albums for me and told me it was a lost Dismember record I would honestly believe you. But I don't care at all that they're not "original" because they write catchy, aggressive, hook-laden songs that are a ton of fun to jam when I'm driving or going for a walk or on any occasion really. That's all I need or want from their music, and many, many people approach music in that way. Bands just need to write songs that people can connect with. Ultimately that's what really matters, not whether the music they're making is groundbreaking or ahead of its time. This hyper-focus on "originality" you have is not anchored to any sort of reality in terms of how people consume music and what they primarily care about, and it doesn't really have any bearing on whether a genre is alive or dead.


why is it strange? Creativity implies originality.


Because you appear to have tunnel vision. Correct me if I'm wrong, but you seem to think all people care about (or should care about) is originality, but that's not how it works in the real world. Creativity does not imply originality, at least as you define it. The band Lik that I mentioned in my example is creative since they're writing new material that hasn't previously existed, composing riffs and melodies, and putting them together to form a cohesive song. They are engaged in an act of creation of original material, music that hasn't already been written by other bands. But since they're operating in a specific niche/paradigm that already exists and not trying to do anything radically different from those that created that paradigm, you probably wouldn't see them as the original. The thing is, though, that by that metric the vast majority of recorded music is not original, and yet there are people out there listening to and enjoying it. They get something out of it even if it's not incredibly novel or groundbreaking.

Also, being original does not mean you make good music, which should go without saying. There are a ton of bands making "original" music who don't appeal to me at all, where I would rather listen to a copy or clone of an existing band any day of the week than listen to them. If you're doing something innovative and I like your music, great. But that's a bonus, not something that needs to happen for me to enjoy the music. In metal, like any other genre, there will be bands pushing the boundaries and bands refining classic sounds, and there's more than enough room in metal for both. People can appreciate bands iterating on sounds they've already heard and love just as much as bands going in some wacky avant-garde direction.

Top
 Profile  
AddWittyUsername
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Oct 07, 2013 8:40 pm
Posts: 206
Location: Netherlands
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 7:14 pm 
 

Bertuccia wrote:
in 2020 were formed 1384 bands, in 2016, instead, 3306 bands, in 2018 were formed 2381 bands.
Therefore there are progressively fewer bands.

Not necessarily, because bands can only be added when they have produced a valid--by the standards of this website--release. Plenty of bands don't produce such a release immediately upon existence, sometimes not even for the first several years they exist. Or they have something that eventually turns out to be a valid release by this website's standards, but it's distributed in such a manner it doesn't get noticed for a fair while (e.g. CD-r demos given out in small numbers at local shows, with no online distros or sites like bandcamp). The more recent a year is, the more likely it is that a large portion of bands that were formed that year have not yet become valid to include on MA, or otherwise have not yet been included.

Top
 Profile  
hells_unicorn
Veteran

Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 8:32 pm
Posts: 2597
Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2021 9:34 pm 
 

After paging through the flood of bit-sized posts by Bertuccia, I think what is at issue here isn't so much a problem with the metal scene, but rather with the cynicism of certain individuals who see history through a lens of hyper-nostalgia that is distorting their understanding of the present. There was a rather relevant quote from the old Kung Fu series where Kwai Chang Caine asks Master Po if it is good to seek the past, as it may rob the present, to which Po wisely responds "If a man dwells upon the past, he may rob the present, but if a man ignores the past, he may rob the future". This notion of nothing being original or good today lacks any sense of nuance or even a moderate degree of reflection in my estimation.

To put it bluntly, I can't be bothered if today's musicians are borrowing from the past, because every person since time immemorial has been doing this. I'm too busy enjoying the next variation on the theme that was pioneered back in the early days of metal to get caught up in this frame of thought. The metal scene is alive and kicking, if you want to be dreary and spend every waking hour reminiscing upon the days when your 6 or 7 favorite bands were in their prime, that's your business and none of mine.
_________________
My music:
Ominous Glory Spotify
Ominous Glory YouTube
Ominous Glory Facebook

My reviews.

R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio (July 14, 1942 - May 16, 2010)

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Sat May 15, 2021 6:49 am 
 

[/quote]



Because you appear to have tunnel vision. Correct me if I'm wrong, but you seem to think all people care about (or should care about) is originality, but that's not how it works in the real world. Creativity does not imply originality, at least as you define it. The band Lik that I mentioned in my example is creative since they're writing new material that hasn't previously existed, composing riffs and melodies, and putting them together to form a cohesive song. They are engaged in an act of creation of original material, music that hasn't already been written by other bands. But since they're operating in a specific niche/paradigm that already exists and not trying to do anything radically different from those that created that paradigm, you probably wouldn't see them as the original. The thing is, though, that by that metric the vast majority of recorded music is not original, and yet there are people out there listening to and enjoying it. They get something out of it even if it's not incredibly novel or groundbreaking.

Also, being original does not mean you make good music, which should go without saying. There are a ton of bands making "original" music who don't appeal to me at all, where I would rather listen to a copy or clone of an existing band any day of the week than listen to them. If you're doing something innovative and I like your music, great. But that's a bonus, not something that needs to happen for me to enjoy the music. In metal, like any other genre, there will be bands pushing the boundaries and bands refining classic sounds, and there's more than enough room in metal for both. People can appreciate bands iterating on sounds they've already heard and love just as much as bands going in some wacky avant-garde direction.[/quote][/quote]

Yes, originality does not mean quality I'm agree. My problem is simply that: I have not enough time anymore to listen to the music. When I creare a playlist in orde to not get annoyed I put a lot of different kind of music: jazz, folk, country, rock, trad metal, Extreme metal, technical metal. I need variety

Top
 Profile  
Bertuccia
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:10 am
Posts: 44
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Sat May 15, 2021 6:51 am 
 

hells_unicorn wrote:
After paging through the flood of bit-sized posts by Bertuccia, I think what is at issue here isn't so much a problem with the metal scene, but rather with the cynicism of certain individuals who see history through a lens of hyper-nostalgia that is distorting their understanding of the present. There was a rather relevant quote from the old Kung Fu series where Kwai Chang Caine asks Master Po if it is good to seek the past, as it may rob the present, to which Po wisely responds "If a man dwells upon the past, he may rob the present, but if a man ignores the past, he may rob the future". This notion of nothing being original or good today lacks any sense of nuance or even a moderate degree of reflection in my estimation.

To put it bluntly, I can't be bothered if today's musicians are borrowing from the past, because every person since time immemorial has been doing this. I'm too busy enjoying the next variation on the theme that was pioneered back in the early days of metal to get caught up in this frame of thought. The metal scene is alive and kicking, if you want to be dreary and spend every waking hour reminiscing upon the days when your 6 or 7 favorite bands were in their prime, that's your business and none of mine.


I became cynic but I don't like it. I want to stop it.

Top
 Profile  
hells_unicorn
Veteran

Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 8:32 pm
Posts: 2597
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat May 15, 2021 3:32 pm 
 

Bertuccia wrote:
I became cynic but I don't like it. I want to stop it.


In my experience, the type of cynicism that you've described arises from being burned out, I went through a similar rut in my music consumption back in the late 1990s towards the end of high school, largely due to being disillusioned with the entire mainstream music scene. I was largely beholden to terrestrial radio back then for any new music entering my collection, and the ascendant nu-metal craze of the time held very little appeal to me, ditto the burgeoning post-grunge craze of Silverchair, Bush and later Creed. So I basically shut myself off for a few months and listened to very little apart from some 18th and 19th century orchestral and solo instrument music (i.e. Bach, Beethoven, Handel, Liszt, Brahms, Bruckner and a few others). This would eventually pave the way for me rediscovering my love of metal via the synthesis of those compositions with the then new wave of power metal bands coming out of Europe. Bands like Stratovarius, Angra and Rhapsody (Of Fire) were not getting any media attention in the United States via media, so I basically had to sink a decent chunk of my spare money on CDs via online distros and Amazon.com in order to get a hold of the stuff between 1999 and 2001.

While I don't think you'll have a spontaneous paradigm shift the way I did back then, you may find yourself having to take a break from things in order to rekindle any interest that you have in the genre. I don't think any person can tell you how to do this, and it may be that you're outgrowing the genre (I hate to say this since this will never happen with me, but I've seen it happen with others), but what you've described in these last two posts definitely sound like burnout to me. This tends to happen when you limit yourself to a finite number of elite bands and don't allow yourself to consider anything newer that might be building off of the same stylistic foundation. My university studies and my hobby/side-job in a band causes me to listen to music a different way than those not in the musical field of study, so I may not be the best point of comparison for you, though if you decided to set aside time to learn your instrument more completely, it may transform the way you listen to music as well, and this goes for what there is outside of metal too.
_________________
My music:
Ominous Glory Spotify
Ominous Glory YouTube
Ominous Glory Facebook

My reviews.

R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio (July 14, 1942 - May 16, 2010)

Top
 Profile  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 23 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

  Print view
Jump to:  

Back to the Encyclopaedia Metallum


Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group