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Auch
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue Jul 23, 2013 10:40 pm
Posts: 324
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2019 1:16 pm 
 

Slam and brutal. If you're willing to look outside of pure death metal and into grindcore, you can look at goregrind.

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dmerritt
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Apr 26, 2003 10:43 pm
Posts: 350
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2019 5:51 pm 
 

Manic Maniac wrote:
"Doom is Heavy Metal"
"Folk Metal... basically Speed"
"Grindcore is not Metal, but a hybrid of Metal and Crossover Thrash"
How can you have so many things just plain wrong?


Well, I confess I'm not sure about Folk Metal, but I'll post the link of what I'm getting this from. That's just a guess on my part. So, a lot of people have a problem with this, and DLA is long-winded and a bit stuffed with themselves, but they've been around a lot longer than almost anybody who's been writing about metal on the Internet.

As for Doom, yeah it comes from Black Sabbath several steps removed. That's basically heavy, Blues-based Rock music. That Doom could be categorized as Heavy Metal (Heavy Metal being a subgenre of Metal) is not something I would have thought would even be debatable, so I'm a bit surprised at the pushback on that one. And the argument about Grindcore is that it is a descendant of Crossover and Hardcore.

I made this account a little less than a year after this site was established, and in 2003 it was not at all uncommon to hear people say that Grindcore was kind of a hybrid form, neither Metal nor Punk. I'm pushing 40 now, so I can see how fans' approach to categorizing things has changed. A bit of that is to be expected. Today, people hear bands like Fearless Iranians From Hell and the first thing they'll say is 'Punk.' But in 1984 they might have said 'not quite'. And, indeed, it is not quite Hardcore. The further back you go, the more you're forced to examine the actual starting and divergence points within these genres.

DLA and the whole (now defunct) A.N.U.S. webring had as many detractors as fans, perhaps more, so don't think I'm submitting this as any kind of authoritative take on categorizing this music. It's just one perspective.

https://darklegionsarchive.neocities.or ... grindcore/
https://darklegionsarchive.neocities.or ... avy_metal/

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TheUnhinged
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jul 26, 2008 2:28 pm
Posts: 266
Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2019 11:50 pm 
 

DBettino wrote:
As for Doom, yeah it comes from Black Sabbath several steps removed. That's basically heavy, Blues-based Rock music. That Doom could be categorized as Heavy Metal (Heavy Metal being a subgenre of Metal) is not something I would have thought would even be debatable, so I'm a bit surprised at the pushback on that one.


I see where you're coming from. I agree that Doom naturally comes from Heavy Metal, but I think to simply say they should be categorized as the same thing is far too broad; it would be like saying "Heavy Metal is just Blues Rock". Heavy Metal originated from Blues, yes, but then you have bands like Iron Maiden, Judas Priest, Saxon, etc who I think sort of shed the slower, doomier elements Black Sabbath had and goes for a more aggressive, more epic sounding style. Likewise, old school traditional Doom is borderline Sabbath-style Heavy Metal a lot of the time (Saint Vitus, Pentagram, Trouble, etc) but over time, Doom has become a lot slower, darker, more morose and has shed a lot of the more rocky, traditional sounding aspects that those bands had. Bands like Yob, Warning, SubRosa, The Wounded Kings, or even My Dying Bride definitely have the influence of Black Sabbath, but they have gone in such a heavier, darker, and more somber direction that it simply doesn't seem right to call them "Heavy Metal" at that point.

+ Looking at that site, all but one of the bands on that "Heavy Metal" tab could be classified as Doom Metal. They even list Skepticism as Heavy Metal. I think listing that and Helstar under the same umbrella is way off. I do understand and respect that it's an older site, but I'm pretty sure Doom Metal had become its own identifier at the time this site was up.

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Vadara
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2016 11:14 pm
Posts: 114
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun Mar 03, 2019 1:03 am 
 

DoomMetalAlchemist wrote:
So, I know very, very little about death metal.

What are the death metal sub-genres that use pig squeals, and burping?


Brutal Death/Slam and some kinds of Deathcore, unless you don't consider the latter a DM subgenre. Traditional Death Metal almost never uses squeals/pitch-shifted vocals ("almost" because I'm pretty sure there's SOME random band out there that has them but isn't BDM, there's a DM band with solely sung vocals out there after all...)

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dmerritt
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Apr 26, 2003 10:43 pm
Posts: 350
Location: United States
PostPosted: Mon Mar 04, 2019 1:01 pm 
 

TheUnhinged wrote:
DBettino wrote:
As for Doom, yeah it comes from Black Sabbath several steps removed. That's basically heavy, Blues-based Rock music. That Doom could be categorized as Heavy Metal (Heavy Metal being a subgenre of Metal) is not something I would have thought would even be debatable, so I'm a bit surprised at the pushback on that one.


I see where you're coming from. I agree that Doom naturally comes from Heavy Metal, but I think to simply say they should be categorized as the same thing is far too broad; it would be like saying "Heavy Metal is just Blues Rock". Heavy Metal originated from Blues, yes, but then you have bands like Iron Maiden, Judas Priest, Saxon, etc who I think sort of shed the slower, doomier elements Black Sabbath had and goes for a more aggressive, more epic sounding style. Likewise, old school traditional Doom is borderline Sabbath-style Heavy Metal a lot of the time (Saint Vitus, Pentagram, Trouble, etc) but over time, Doom has become a lot slower, darker, more morose and has shed a lot of the more rocky, traditional sounding aspects that those bands had. Bands like Yob, Warning, SubRosa, The Wounded Kings, or even My Dying Bride definitely have the influence of Black Sabbath, but they have gone in such a heavier, darker, and more somber direction that it simply doesn't seem right to call them "Heavy Metal" at that point.

+ Looking at that site, all but one of the bands on that "Heavy Metal" tab could be classified as Doom Metal. They even list Skepticism as Heavy Metal. I think listing that and Helstar under the same umbrella is way off. I do understand and respect that it's an older site, but I'm pretty sure Doom Metal had become its own identifier at the time this site was up.


I agree with everything you said. I only meant that Doom can be considered to fall under the umbrella of 'Heavy Metal', along with several other sub-classifications. That's not to say that Doom isn't its own thing. One could definitely say that My Dying Bride also falls under that subgenre of 'Heavy Metal', yet they sound nothing like Pentagram or Yob.

Granted, to look at things this way paints with a broader brush than most probably prefer.

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Opus
Veteran

Joined: Sun Sep 22, 2002 11:06 am
Posts: 2843
Location: Sweden
PostPosted: Mon Mar 04, 2019 1:14 pm 
 

Heavy metal is not a sub genre, it's the genre.
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Vadara
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2016 11:14 pm
Posts: 114
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 2:44 pm 
 

I thought Sabbath started out as pure Doom (making Doom the first Metal genre) and then Trad was formed by shedding the doomy bits, leaving just the heavy bits and the riffs.

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Manic Maniac
Grammaritically Challengated

Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2013 1:58 pm
Posts: 226
Location: United States
PostPosted: Wed Mar 06, 2019 4:45 pm 
 

Sabbath didn't start out as anything other than as a rock band. Their sound varied from progressive rock to psychedelic rock to blues rock to hard rock. Metal was an accident (for lack of a better word). You can't just pigeon-hole Black Sabbath into doom metal or as heavy metal. That's not how music evolves. Genres don't just pop out of no where.
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dmerritt
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Apr 26, 2003 10:43 pm
Posts: 350
Location: United States
PostPosted: Wed Mar 06, 2019 6:54 pm 
 

Manic Maniac wrote:
Sabbath didn't start out as anything other than as a rock band. Their sound varied from progressive rock to psychedelic rock to blues rock to hard rock. Metal was an accident (for lack of a better word). You can't just pigeon-hole Black Sabbath into doom metal or as heavy metal. That's not how music evolves. Genres don't just pop out of no where.


Of course innovation tends to happen by accident, but I don't see how calling Black Sabbath a Heavy Metal band is pigeon-holing. I'm not sure what you're trying to say.

The way I've always seen it, someone creates something new that is seen in hindsight as a derivation point. More and more bands follow from this point onward. A new trajectory is created. And then people give it a name, and genres and subgenres are born.

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Vadara
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2016 11:14 pm
Posts: 114
Location: United States
PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 1:48 am 
 

Manic Maniac wrote:
Sabbath didn't start out as anything other than as a rock band. Their sound varied from progressive rock to psychedelic rock to blues rock to hard rock. Metal was an accident (for lack of a better word). You can't just pigeon-hole Black Sabbath into doom metal or as heavy metal. That's not how music evolves. Genres don't just pop out of no where.

Genres are fluid but you must draw the line somewhere and in my experience nearly everyone universally agrees to draw the line at Black Sabbath being the first Metal band and their self-titled album being the first Metal album. Of course no one called it "metal" at first: no one was aware that it wasn't just some one off album and had spawned a whole genre until people started copying its stylistic choices and forged out the basic framework of Heavy Metal.

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Manic Maniac
Grammaritically Challengated

Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2013 1:58 pm
Posts: 226
Location: United States
PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 10:02 am 
 

My point was both Heavy Metal and Doom Metal both came from rock as separate genres. Also, Black Sabbath's first album only had one metal song in it, the title track. There is no metal riff in the other songs of that album.
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TheUnhinged
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jul 26, 2008 2:28 pm
Posts: 266
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 4:13 am 
 

Manic Maniac wrote:
My point was both Heavy Metal and Doom Metal both came from rock as separate genres. Also, Black Sabbath's first album only had one metal song in it, the title track. There is no metal riff in the other songs of that album.


I wouldn't say that... The Wizard and N.I.B. definitely sound like metal to me, at the very least. The rest is a bit more mellow, but I'd still say it's borderline rock/metal as a whole. Of course, there are various shades of rock in there (psych, blues, hard rock, etc) but I don't think it's unreasonable to consider the self-titled as the first metal album.

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Kalimata
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2017 9:29 am
Posts: 59
Location: France
PostPosted: Sat Mar 23, 2019 10:28 am 
 

Vadara wrote:
I thought Sabbath started out as pure Doom


I'm sorry but this statement does not make much sense. There was nothing such as metal when Sabbath started ; Ozzy himself said that they were called "heavy rock" and it's only later that the term heavy metal appeared (please don't refer to Steppenwolf singing "heavy metal thunder" in 1966 :crash: ). And doom metal appeared in the early 80's as a slow and doomy Sabbath inspired subgenre of heavy metal.
I agree that Sabbath is the band that started (and kind of achieved) the transition from rock to metal. But saying that they "started out as pure doom" is excessive. Heavy metal is heavy metal, doom metal is doom metal. But one could say that this "acid heavy rock/metal" that layed the foundation for the heavy metal genre could be called, in revisionist manner, "proto-doom metal".

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tomcat_ha
Minister of Boiling Water

Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2006 8:05 am
Posts: 4859
Location: Netherlands
PostPosted: Sat Mar 23, 2019 3:51 pm 
 

well id say that it goes a bit farther than that, children of the grave is definitely a doom metal song for example.

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Manic Maniac
Grammaritically Challengated

Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2013 1:58 pm
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Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun Mar 24, 2019 1:12 pm 
 

Children of the Grave is more like groove metal for most of the song.
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Kalimata
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2017 9:29 am
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Location: France
PostPosted: Tue Apr 02, 2019 3:04 pm 
 

"Children of the grave" is neither doom metal nor groove metal. Saying this makes no sense. What is the next step? Sabbath are djent??

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Manic Maniac
Grammaritically Challengated

Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2013 1:58 pm
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2019 8:54 am 
 

It's literally the same riff as Pantera's "Walk" with less tone variation yet somehow better.
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swedeam
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2018 3:12 am
Posts: 11
PostPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:13 pm 
 

Manic Maniac wrote:
It's literally the same riff as Pantera's "Walk" with less tone variation yet somehow better.

Well, considering "Walk" has a tonal veriation of two intervals and a bit, I doubt that "Children of the Grave" has less tonal veriation.

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Manic Maniac
Grammaritically Challengated

Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2013 1:58 pm
Posts: 226
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2019 12:29 pm 
 

Both have a five note "gallup". Children of the grave uses the same tone for the last four while Walk uses a descending pattern for the last 4. Both begin with a low note before the second one starts at a higher note. The rhythm is the same.
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swedeam
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2018 3:12 am
Posts: 11
PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2019 12:00 am 
 

Manic Maniac wrote:
Both have a five note "gallup". Children of the grave uses the same tone for the last four while Walk uses a descending pattern for the last 4. Both begin with a low note before the second one starts at a higher note. The rhythm is the same.

Sure it is. I'd never dispute the rhythm simerlarities.

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Pessipath
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2012 4:00 pm
Posts: 95
Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri Apr 12, 2019 11:19 pm 
 

infinitenexus wrote:
Can someone describe "post-metal" for me and maybe give an example?


Post-metal is essentially metal that emphasizes on atmosphere, texture and creating walls of sound.
Essentially "using metal instrumentation for non-metal purposes"

The RateYourMusic definition for it is pretty spot on.
Bands like Pelican, Neurosis, Amenra, Cult of Luna, Sólstafir are all examples

Also there is "atmospheric sludge metal" which is specifically the sludge metal centric (and most common form) of post-metal which Neurosis pretty much invented

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Pessipath
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2012 4:00 pm
Posts: 95
Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri Apr 12, 2019 11:20 pm 
 

Auch wrote:
Slam and brutal. If you're willing to look outside of pure death metal and into grindcore, you can look at goregrind.


Brutal DM is absolutely real and slam does have a distinct sound/approach to it compared to normal BDM so I'd say it's fair to consider it a genre.

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goregoose
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Apr 29, 2017 11:34 am
Posts: 41
Location: China
PostPosted: Sat Apr 13, 2019 7:06 am 
 

Since I bothered to make a silly thread about it with examples of such bands: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=123533
How valid do you deem melodic heavy metal, do you feel "melodic" is just serving as an adjective or rather "melodic heavy metal" it's self is akin to something like "melodic death metal", that it's so stylistically different it isn't just heavy metal with added melody. I personally feel melodic heavy metal is like some proto-power metal, or occassionally a hard-rock/heavy metal mix which uses synths, or a safe alternative to glam metal that's not in the least bit edgey yet doesn't make you feel ashamed of yourself to listen.

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Ilwhyan
Metel fraek

Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2007 1:41 pm
Posts: 7912
Location: Lifeless shadows
PostPosted: Sun Apr 14, 2019 4:40 pm 
 

Pessipath wrote:
infinitenexus wrote:
Can someone describe "post-metal" for me and maybe give an example?


Post-metal is essentially metal that emphasizes on atmosphere, texture and creating walls of sound.
Essentially "using metal instrumentation for non-metal purposes"

The RateYourMusic definition for it is pretty spot on.
Bands like Pelican, Neurosis, Amenra, Cult of Luna, Sólstafir are all examples

Also there is "atmospheric sludge metal" which is specifically the sludge metal centric (and most common form) of post-metal which Neurosis pretty much invented

There's also a lot of bi-lateral influence with post-rock, meaning bands like Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Mono, and Explosions in the Sky. Conceptually, these bands distinguished themselves with post-punk influenced textural and effect-ridden guitar playing, combined with deconstructed song structures, vast build-ups, and variety in dynamics. Some bands remind of me of classical impressionism. The term crescendo-core is thrown around, but few bands actually play any crescendos, strictly speaking.
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Vadara
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2016 11:14 pm
Posts: 114
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 2:16 am 
 

Why are some bands such as Graves of Valor (https://www.metal-archives.com/bands/Gr ... 3540288511) listed as Death Metal/Deathcore? That sounds like an incredibly redundant genre description--it can't mean "Deathcore bands that are predominantly metal" because ALL Deathcore bands on the archives by definition are predominantly metal. Is it just for bands that are VERY metal and have only trace -core influences?

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krust_Korg_55
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sun Oct 01, 2017 7:07 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Venezuela
PostPosted: Sun Apr 21, 2019 9:40 pm 
 

Could you explain me the concept of Blackened?

I understand that in several subgenres, the Blackened is used, in my opinion, to describe bands that make a 50/50 of both genders, that is, they are balanced one from the other; more than anything in riffs, composition and voice. An example is the Blackened Death Metal, which in this one I understand more.
In bands like Angelcorpse, God Dethroned or Blood Of The Wolf, which make a perfect balance of both styles.
And it is obvious that the Blackened Death is a different style to the Black/Death and Death/Black, since these 2 usually use a lot the percentage of the main genre that they are playing that the 2nd genre added, and sometimes it does not give them a balance as such as in the Blackened.

But there are times when they use the Blackened in other genres, and sometimes it brings me confusion. For example, in the Thrash.
Witchery is in MA as Blackened, and the truth is if I notice Black, but not enough to be Blackened, since I do not notice enough blast beats or many elements of the Black to be crossed out as Blackened, it feels more Black in the voice and in the essence. On the other hand, Absu does have a lot, because if he brings enough elements of the Black, and I feel that he is very balanced with his Thrash, and I think it could be more Blackened than anything else.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I need your help. And I want you to give me some examples

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Diplomate
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2019 7:04 pm
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 28, 2019 8:51 am 
 

Is gothic rock influence necessary in order for a band to be classified as gothic metal? Many of the bands classified as gothic metal have little to no gothic rock influences. I mean bands like The Sins of Thy Beloved and Draconian, which are just melodic death-doom in opinion. Compare them to bands like Paradise Lost, Theatre of Tragedy and Tristania which are death-doom with lots of gothic rock influences. I feel like gothic metal originally referred to the latter bands since Paradise Lost if the pioneer of this genre, but later other bands with similar death-doom elements were lumped into this category despite having no gothic rock elements.
If we agree that gothic rock influence is necessary, then lots of bands need relabelling. If not, then what differentiates death-doom from gothic metal then?

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Osmiumthemetal
Metal newbie

Joined: Tue May 24, 2016 10:30 pm
Posts: 120
PostPosted: Sun Apr 28, 2019 7:02 pm 
 

Going back a month to the doom discussion, doom metal is a strange genre to discuss origins about. Most of the early bands considered heavy metal are doom to some extent, Black Sabbath has a lot of doom (obviously), Flower Travellin' Band is largely doom, early Budgie is doomy, Lucifer's Friend and Night Sun had some doom tracks, Randy Holden's Population II is doom, even early Judas Priest had some doom (the Winter/Deep Freeze suite on Rocka Rolla).

Doom in it's straightest form is pretty much a subset of heavy metal, usually just played slowly and with more dire aesthetics. The lines were totally blurred through the 70s and even into the early 80s (is there really anything about Witchfinder General or Pentagram that strays from heavy metal), of course they started to diverge later on when doom became more of a self-conscious thing and seeped into other genres.

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Manic Maniac
Grammaritically Challengated

Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2013 1:58 pm
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2019 10:58 am 
 

Nearly all subgenres of metal have there origin in the 70's and all of them blurred with one another and blurred with non-metal genres as well. This is how genres evolve.
"Is there really anything about... Pentagram that strays from Heavy Metal" Well I don't hear any Heavy Metal in them. They sound like Doom Metal with some Rock elements.
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krust_Korg_55
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sun Oct 01, 2017 7:07 pm
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Location: Venezuela
PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2019 4:49 pm 
 

How would you define the Epic Metal? Do you think it's a real genre? And what things characterize it?

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Diplomate
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2019 7:04 pm
Posts: 96
PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 2:46 pm 
 

krust_Korg_55 wrote:
How would you define the Epic Metal? Do you think it's a real genre? And what things characterize it?

I am not an expert, but in my opinion in most cases "Epic" tag is synonymous with "Power metal" when it comes to genres on metallum. For example, Bal-Sagoth is called "Symphonic/Epic Black Metal" on the Archives, but I would call them blackened power metal. Maybe this "Epic" tag is not always about the riffs being derived from power metal, but more about the atmosphere and synths. Those "Epic" bands have a fantasy/glory/happy feel to them akin to that of power metal bands.

In my opinion, "Epic" is not a real genre. In many cases this tag is a little frustrating, for example I hate how Ensiferum is labelled "Epic folk metal" when it should be labelled as "Folk melodic death/power metal" which is way more accurate.

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tomcat_ha
Minister of Boiling Water

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Location: Netherlands
PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2019 2:56 pm 
 

epic can be bands like Manilla Road or Brocas Helm which basically means american heavy/power metal with more of a focus on storytelling regarding both song writing as well as lyrically.
epic doom means bands that sound like Candlemass basically.
epic black metal like cult of fire is basically atmospheric black metal but generally more upbeat.

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Vadara
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2016 11:14 pm
Posts: 114
Location: United States
PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2019 1:41 am 
 

Vadara wrote:
Why are some bands such as Graves of Valor (https://www.metal-archives.com/bands/Gr ... 3540288511) listed as Death Metal/Deathcore? That sounds like an incredibly redundant genre description--it can't mean "Deathcore bands that are predominantly metal" because ALL Deathcore bands on the archives by definition are predominantly metal. Is it just for bands that are VERY metal and have only trace -core influences?


Adding onto this, I have now come across a band tagged "Death Metal/Metalcore":

https://www.metal-archives.com/bands/In ... rive/44136

How is this not just...Deathcore?

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Roktan
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Thu Aug 27, 2015 8:41 pm
Posts: 11
Location: United States
PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2019 6:56 pm 
 

Why is Manetheren listed as simply black metal, when I've heard it described as depressive black and to me it sounds more like atmospheric/melodic black, especially the later albums?

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Storm of the Light's Bane
Metalhead

Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2015 11:16 pm
Posts: 671
PostPosted: Fri May 03, 2019 10:46 am 
 

Diplomate wrote:
krust_Korg_55 wrote:
How would you define the Epic Metal? Do you think it's a real genre? And what things characterize it?

I am not an expert, but in my opinion in most cases "Epic" tag is synonymous with "Power metal" when it comes to genres on metallum. For example, Bal-Sagoth is called "Symphonic/Epic Black Metal" on the Archives, but I would call them blackened power metal. Maybe this "Epic" tag is not always about the riffs being derived from power metal, but more about the atmosphere and synths. Those "Epic" bands have a fantasy/glory/happy feel to them akin to that of power metal bands.

In my opinion, "Epic" is not a real genre. In many cases this tag is a little frustrating, for example I hate how Ensiferum is labelled "Epic folk metal" when it should be labelled as "Folk melodic death/power metal" which is way more accurate.

No, not really. What tomcat said is much more accurate.

Vadara wrote:
Vadara wrote:
Why are some bands such as Graves of Valor (https://www.metal-archives.com/bands/Gr ... 3540288511) listed as Death Metal/Deathcore? That sounds like an incredibly redundant genre description--it can't mean "Deathcore bands that are predominantly metal" because ALL Deathcore bands on the archives by definition are predominantly metal. Is it just for bands that are VERY metal and have only trace -core influences?


Adding onto this, I have now come across a band tagged "Death Metal/Metalcore":

https://www.metal-archives.com/bands/In ... rive/44136

How is this not just...Deathcore?

imo there is a difference between death metal/metalcore and deathcore, bands usually listed as death metal/metalcore are not exactly deathcore or play death metal at times, and metalcore at others.
_________________
Xenophon wrote:
I'm sure he would have pushed strongly for them to be included. I'm guessing there was a fight among the mods over whether to include them, and it ended with Metantoine being imprisoned in Napero's Finnish ice wizard tower.

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krust_Korg_55
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sun Oct 01, 2017 7:07 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Venezuela
PostPosted: Fri May 17, 2019 2:57 pm 
 

Can someone tell me clearly what is the difference between Atmospheric Black Metal and Ambient Black Metal?

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Diplomate
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2019 7:04 pm
Posts: 96
PostPosted: Sun May 19, 2019 8:19 pm 
 

I am asking questions about gothic metal way too much, but I can't leave this mess be. I request a moderator's opinion on what consitutes gothic metal. With death/black/power/doom or any other kind of metal one can name the precursors to the genre, the list of artists that pioneered it and finally the musical features that differentiate it from other genres. With gothic metal there is nothing like that, completely different bands are being lumped into the genre despite having no shared features.

For example, Paradise Lost is gothic metal because it has gothic rock elements, My Dying Bride is gothic metal because they have references to gothic aesthetics, a lot of power/symphonic metal bands are being called gothic because of featuring a female singer and having sad keyboards.

So it would be great if the mods intervened and finally gave a definition of gothic metal. A subsequent purge of the incorrectly lebelled bands should follow.

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