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Abominatrix
Harbinger of Metal

Joined: Fri Oct 24, 2003 12:15 pm
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Location: Canada
PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 6:19 pm 
 

I don't want this to turn into a topic about "the evils of smoking". I find it a rather unattractive habit myself but that's not what this is about.

Obviously, a weathered, abused voice works very well for some sorts of music, metal and otherwise. I don't think Lemmy would have his distinctive raspy delivery if he had embarked on a quest for clean living forty years ago. However, the clear, high and sustained tenor of many classic metal vocalists is not the sort of thing a person can keep doing for years on end if he constantly 'attacks' his lungs and throat with cigarettes. I imagine strong liquor might have a rather deleterious effect, as well. WIthout doubt, regular touring, putting your voice out there with 100% power every night and/or poor technique can also have negative results on one's range and ability over time. some singers have kept it together remarkably well (Dio, Eric Adams) James Rivera) while others (Rob halford, Geoff tate, Robert Lowe) seem to have rapidly gone downhill or else had to drastically change their vocal approaches because they simply can't hit the notes they used to or sustain notes for nearly as long as they once did. of the first group, I am pretty sure Adams and Dio were quite rigorous about maintaining their health, although I have heard that Dio wasn't averse to smoking joints in the past.

So, any thoughts on this? When you see a really strong, high vocalist "ruining" his voice smoking like a chimney, do you think "what a waste", or are the affects overemphasised? Speaking for myself, I can feel my lung capacity shrinking and my voice getting weaker after one cigarette or pipeful of weed; I can only imagine what it's like for steady users and I feel like belting it out on stage while maintaining this habit must be exhausting. But have you ever been surprised to learn that a singer smokes? I imagine some guys can pull it off just by learning and adopting the right techniques. Interestnly, despite what I said about messiah, I noticed that he doesn't usually sustain notes for very long on stage. I'm not actually sure if he smokes or not.
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waiguoren
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 6:53 pm 
 

King Diamond was a smoker until after his heart surgery and he sounded fine to me. I don't think you can really guess by a person's vocals if they smoke or not, or if it even has such a big effect on a person's voice without taking other factors into account. Christ I read about a "study" recently that claimed third-hand smoke was bad for people, you know, now that all those people who have died from second-hand are busy pushing up the daisies I guess we need a new boogeyman to distract us from the crap food we eat or whatevs.
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Abominatrix
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 7:01 pm 
 

Well, I think it is possible to tell in many cases at least; I've known people who start smoking in their twenties rather than their teens and it seems noticeable to me..the voice deepens, becomes raspier, and there's often a small but persistent cough that stays with them forever and wasn't present prior to picking up the habit.

:lol: I don't even know what third-hand smoke is. If I come back from a house party and my hair and clothes smell like cigarettes, am I going to give my girlfriend cancer when I kiss her?

I'm a bit surprised to learn about King Diamond, but not that much. To tell the truth he hasn't had a great voice for years, although he can still keep it up admirably and deliver the goods on stage, so to speak...
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TheNiceNightmare
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 7:03 pm 
 

^ The fuck does third-hand smoke even mean?

I don't think anyone is going to argue that smoking is beneficial for that kind of voice, but I don't think it has to be that bad either. Of course, "smoking" doesn't say much...are we talking social smoker, a couple a day, a couple packs a day, or what? But I think you can make up for it through other means, exercise for instance, enough that in the end it might not hurt your performance almost at all.
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Abominatrix
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 7:12 pm 
 

I wouldn't count social smoking...most "social smokers" are meerely non-smokers who enjoy a puff every now and then, like me. Then again, I do smoke weed more often, and I think the affects of sucking burning shit into your lungs probably shouldn't be downplayed. I mean obviously for some it's just totally worth it and nothing to get worked up over, but if you're instrument is your voice, it's probably going to have an affect eventually. It even affects your ability to exercise as your tar-coated lungs won't take in as much oxygen, which means you'll get tired after a shorter/less strenuous workout than you otherwise would.
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Lightsbane
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Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2008 10:17 am
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 8:58 pm 
 

Part of it is age. The voice deepens as you get older so that's going to happen regardless. But smoking obviously doesn't help. It may add some rasp and sound cool for a little while but it'll catch up to you. Also just say no
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Flugeldufel
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Joined: Sat May 22, 2010 4:41 pm
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 9:14 pm 
 

Robert Lowe is the most obvious example for me. Compare the first few Solitude Aeturnus albums to the new Candlemass stuff. He can't even attempt to sing like he used to. There was an interview with him on metal-rules after he joined Candlemass and half of it is him talking about how much he loves to smoke, it was painful to read. Plus it's my understanding he has had some problems with drinking as well. But with him I really do feel it's a waste of his formerly amazing ability.

King Diamond was always a smoker until his heart attack, but during his recovery he quit. The live videos I've seen of him since his return are quite impressive, displaying a lot of the range he didn't even attempt on his later albums. Not to oversimplify, but he can apparently still sing really, really high. I respect him more than I ever did after hearing about his recovery and tentative returns to the stage.

I think Halford is just getting old. Not to sound like the metal rumor mill about these guys, but he apparently quit doing blow around Turbo, which to me shows why his vocals were more over the top again on Ram it Down and Painkiller. Although on those he uses his voice in a much harsher manner, which also bugs me to some degree when you know what else a singer is capable of. Also, constant touring is apparently really tough on one's voice, which you can hear even on videos from the Screaming for Vengeance days - compared to some of the 70's videos where he is just belting it out.

And I don't even like Pantera, but Phil Anselmo definitely falls into the category of wasting his talent. I haven't heard Power Metal but he actually was a relatively good singer on Cowboys, displaying a good amount of Halford worship and range. Between the drugs and the redneck image you only ever hear growling and shouting from the man ever since. He sounds awful on their live disc. Maybe his work in Down is different, but I don't really care.

Even if you don't smoke I imagine the rigors of touring will take its toll if you are doing huge tours and singing night after night. As someone who has smoked on and off for years, I can definitely vouch for how much better you feel when you stop, even after a couple of days. And the little cough is annoying as hell, people who never see you smoke or smell it will still know.

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JerryLeeEx
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 9:27 pm 
 

It's always beneficial for vocalists to refrain from smoking. Not only does it preserve the clarity and tone of your voice but it gives you more breath control and stamina to sing for long periods without running out of steam. If you want a rasp, it's better to learn to create it without the aid of a pack-a-day habit.

I can kinda understand some of the vocalists who were smokers first and then started singing later. But, if you started singing first and then picked up a smoking habit, I think that's just irresponsible.

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ENKC
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 10:27 pm 
 

It's hard to imagine smoking not having a negative effect. Even if it doesn't change a voice obviously, it's going to have a massive impact on the health and longevity of a singer. There's a reason Bruce Dickinson is still leaping around stages like a man half his age while Paul Di'Anno looks like street trash.

Halford looked after his voice pretty well under the circumstances, I think. It took some studio magic to pull off the Painkiller album in the first place, so it's hardly surprising he struggled with in on that tour. His next few years of other projects probably did him a lot of good in allowing him to experiment with his voice and not touring quite as strenuously as with Priest. That said, he's had the occasional "Painkiller 2.0" type of track on several of his releases since. See: Beneath the Violence, Resurrection, Handing Out Bullets, Demonizer, The Mower.
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metroplex
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 12:54 am 
 

Kai Hansen and Andi Deris are known chain smokers, their range have diminished, you can tell by the kind of songs they write nowadays, specially Deris.

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Rocka_Rollas
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2011 5:08 am
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 2:29 am 
 

Flugeldufel wrote:
And I don't even like Pantera, but Phil Anselmo definitely falls into the category of wasting his talent. I haven't heard Power Metal but he actually was a relatively good singer on Cowboys, displaying a good amount of Halford worship and range. Between the drugs and the redneck image you only ever hear growling and shouting from the man ever since. He sounds awful on their live disc. Maybe his work in Down is different, but I don't really care.


His singing on Power Metal is fucking godly. I don't even care about stuff after or before that album, his singing on that album alone is one of my influences on me as a singer, and I just recently started singing that kind of stuff.

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Temple Of Blood
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 2:43 am 
 

It's a horrible idea to smoke, especially if you are a singer. My singing teacher wouldn't even accept smokers as students.

It's hard enough to sing well even if you are perfectly healthy. Why put up unnecessary obstacles for yourself?
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Opus
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 6:38 am 
 

Abominatrix wrote:
despite what I said about messiah,

What did you say about Messiah, and where did you say it?
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Mistereyedee
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 7:41 am 
 

Although not related to smoking (I don't think, at least), Warrel Dane sacrificed his epic voice to give us his band's only true classic: Refuge Denied.
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Desperta_Ferro
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 8:58 am 
 

Singing is all about energy, lung capacity (the amount of air you are able to "move" in and out) and stamina. Smoking is one of the worst things you can do to your voice.

Also, heavy metal is very demanding on the stamina, after all.

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invoked
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 10:54 am 
 

Any form of strain on the vocal chords will cause a long term loss in singing capacity. A large number of metal vocalists probably do this without even smoking or drinking: they strain their voice by singing. They forgo any form of training, which is unfortunate since most styles of metal singing are quite demanding. Think of James Hetfield, who nearly destroyed his voice completely. Ihsahn and Dave Vincent are notable examples as well, although I believe the latter actually changed drastically long after he had stopped smoking. When you hear vocalists that could belt it out for decades, like Dio or Halford, they probably either had some form of training or were just very lucky with the technique they naturally developed.

And come on bro, if you're gonna smoke weed (regularly), vape that shit.
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Littlewolf
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 12:48 pm 
 

You can always tell a smoker by his/her voice, women especially. I cannot speak for others, but I can tell you that after 30 years of smoking pack a day (started when I was twelve), I sound like Johan Hegg. Hard liquor added insult to injury, although I've never been much of a drinker, and I don't smoke a pack a day any longer, half a pack maybe, and virtually don't drink any more....but the damage is done.

Also, as people get older, their vocal chords undergo some changes and their voices tend to be lower even if they haven't smoked or enjoyed hard liquor...
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Riffs
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 1:27 pm 
 

Abominatrix wrote:
I don't want this to turn into a topic about "the evils of smoking". I find it a rather unattractive habit myself but that's not what this is about.

Obviously, a weathered, abused voice works very well for some sorts of music, metal and otherwise. I don't think Lemmy would have his distinctive raspy delivery if he had embarked on a quest for clean living forty years ago. However, the clear, high and sustained tenor of many classic metal vocalists is not the sort of thing a person can keep doing for years on end if he constantly 'attacks' his lungs and throat with cigarettes. I imagine strong liquor might have a rather deleterious effect, as well. WIthout doubt, regular touring, putting your voice out there with 100% power every night and/or poor technique can also have negative results on one's range and ability over time. some singers have kept it together remarkably well (Dio, Eric Adams) James Rivera) while others (Rob halford, Geoff tate, Robert Lowe) seem to have rapidly gone downhill or else had to drastically change their vocal approaches because they simply can't hit the notes they used to or sustain notes for nearly as long as they once did. of the first group, I am pretty sure Adams and Dio were quite rigorous about maintaining their health, although I have heard that Dio wasn't averse to smoking joints in the past.

So, any thoughts on this? When you see a really strong, high vocalist "ruining" his voice smoking like a chimney, do you think "what a waste", or are the affects overemphasised? Speaking for myself, I can feel my lung capacity shrinking and my voice getting weaker after one cigarette or pipeful of weed; I can only imagine what it's like for steady users and I feel like belting it out on stage while maintaining this habit must be exhausting. But have you ever been surprised to learn that a singer smokes? I imagine some guys can pull it off just by learning and adopting the right techniques. Interestnly, despite what I said about messiah, I noticed that he doesn't usually sustain notes for very long on stage. I'm not actually sure if he smokes or not.


I like to think of singing as three rough components: technique, feel and the singer's body.

It's tough to talk about vocals because even among heavy/power, there are many different styles being used and they put those three components to use very differently. Some rely on their talent, while others compensate for a lack of talent with technique.

Of course, you're better off mastering all three components. Each component helps the two other, if you know what you are doing. If you don't, it may not accomplish much. Take lung power for instance. It's a useful tool, if you know how to use it. But it doesn't mean much if you don't know what to do with it. It's about control too.

That's why I think open questions like this are always difficult to answer to. There's tons of singers out there. They all have different biologies (which includes how they are affected by tobacco). They approach singing very differently. They also attempt to accomplish different things.

I think smoking is always bad for your body. But it doesn't follow the same curve for everybody. To answer another of your question, I'm not surprised so many singers are smokers. The "don't give a fuck attitude" prevalent in the types of music made it a likely match for many, especially during the 60s, 70s and 80s. Things are changing fast now. In the 80s, everybody that I knew that played rock and metal were smokers. Singers and everybody else. Smoking was prevalent even in recording studios (despite how bad it is for the equipment).

Since 2012, I have noticed I have played exclusively with non smokers metalheads. I was the only guy who smoked. Me, the singer who can't always reach the notes. I stopped recently (february 10th, it will be a month tomorrow) and I have noticed a drastic change as a singer. I have a lot less fatigue. My voice box used to wear out in 20 minutes. There was a slight strain that even correct technique couldn't prevent. Now it's gone and I can sing a full set without any fatigue or strain. One of my chief worries was mucus. It's almost totally gone now that I have stopped smoking. Makes a big difference for me.

Every singer is different. They age differently too. I don't think smoking explains everything. For instance, I think Geoff Tate is more hampered by his mindset than anything else. It's like he's a different person nowadays. Approaching singing and even music differently. With Halford, the mindset is there. Same feel for this music but obviously, his reliance on natural ability is affected by age.

I'm not sure it's fair to say Halford's voice declined so rapidly. Poor guy had a good run and experimented a lot between 1974 and 1990 with vocal acrobatics and in a way, being a pioneer of a kind of extreme vocals by adding grit and intensity. But in 1990 he became defined by Painkiller (the song) in 1990 and ever since then, has felt the need to cater to a part of the crowd that is obsessed with this exact type of vocals. It's been lamely included since on almost every record he's done (Fight, Halford, Angel of Retribution and so on...) and done during shows. It's obviously taken a toll.

Guys like Ronnie James Dio were smarter. He adapted his repertoire to his age. If Dio had let songs like Stand Up and Shout define him, he would not have fared as well because he was butchering those vocals live a decade later. You shouldn't let the extremities of your vocal abilities define you. Or else, people will define you by those very same thing.
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colin040
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 3:38 pm 
 

Riffs wrote:
Guys like Ronnie James Dio were smarter. He adapted his repertoire to his age. If Dio had let songs like Stand Up and Shout define him, he would not have fared as well because he was butchering those vocals live a decade later. You shouldn't let the extremities of your vocal abilities define you. Or else, people will define you by those very same thing.


For sure...I think it's a tendecy for metal singers to look for their limits vocally but in the end, if that's what's the image you create for yourself as a singer, then people will expect you to do that from time to time which to me seems overkill.

And yeah, obviously smoking is an absolute stupid idea to do as a singer and definitely not worth it. I'm glad that I don't do it.

Another example of someone who definitely paid the toll of his voice is Ray Alder. Granted, he was over excited singing very high back in the 80's/early 90's but he definitely lost the ability to do those shatter glass screams mostly nowadays, although I still like his voice quite a bit because he seems to know how to handle his singing despite not being the same as he was 20 years ago. Still, if only he actually learned how to control his high notes better with more training, I think could have ended up pretty well-aged.

EDIT: What's up with people blaming vocal loss on age though? I can't speak of experience but from what I've heard of plenty of vocal teachers, the voice darkens a bit thorough the years which shouldn't be an disadvantage as long as your technique, healthstyle and whatsnot is fine.

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Metal Shark
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 10:30 pm 
 

Mistereyedee wrote:
Although not related to smoking (I don't think, at least), Warrel Dane sacrificed his epic voice to give us his band's only true classic: Refuge Denied.


he could have blown his voice out on BATTLE ANGELS alone! Love the song, though!

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captain_che
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:38 pm 
 

Flugeldufel wrote:
And I don't even like Pantera, but Phil Anselmo definitely falls into the category of wasting his talent […] he actually was a relatively good singer on Cowboys, displaying a good amount of Halford worship and range.


This is only true if you like power metal, which some of us don't. I love Phil's post-Cowboys vocals, cleans and screams.

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Ancient_Mariner
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2014 10:42 pm 
 

Having heard Phil live with Down twice, which requires little range compared to CFH and earlier Pantera I'd say he's pretty much lost his voice. He sounds terrible. Heck he can't even pull of NOLA stuff live.

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Ancient_Mariner
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2014 10:43 pm 
 

colin040 wrote:
Riffs wrote:
Guys like Ronnie James Dio were smarter. He adapted his repertoire to his age. If Dio had let songs like Stand Up and Shout define him, he would not have fared as well because he was butchering those vocals live a decade later. You shouldn't let the extremities of your vocal abilities define you. Or else, people will define you by those very same thing.


For sure...I think it's a tendecy for metal singers to look for their limits vocally but in the end, if that's what's the image you create for yourself as a singer, then people will expect you to do that from time to time which to me seems overkill.

And yeah, obviously smoking is an absolute stupid idea to do as a singer and definitely not worth it. I'm glad that I don't do it.

Another example of someone who definitely paid the toll of his voice is Ray Alder. Granted, he was over excited singing very high back in the 80's/early 90's but he definitely lost the ability to do those shatter glass screams mostly nowadays, although I still like his voice quite a bit because he seems to know how to handle his singing despite not being the same as he was 20 years ago. Still, if only he actually learned how to control his high notes better with more training, I think could have ended up pretty well-aged.

EDIT: What's up with people blaming vocal loss on age though? I can't speak of experience but from what I've heard of plenty of vocal teachers, the voice darkens a bit thorough the years which shouldn't be an disadvantage as long as your technique, healthstyle and whatsnot is fine.


Probably more wear and tear due to the rigors of being a touring metal band.

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Folkemon_
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 5:06 pm 
 

King Diamond can somehow still hit some high ass notes, he sounds amazing on the clips on YT.
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LefterisK
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 5:25 pm 
 

Metal Shark wrote:
Mistereyedee wrote:
Although not related to smoking (I don't think, at least), Warrel Dane sacrificed his epic voice to give us his band's only true classic: Refuge Denied.


he could have blown his voice out on BATTLE ANGELS alone! Love the song, though!


Ηis vocal range is indeed impressive! It sends shivers down your spine!

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thrashinbatman
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 7:36 pm 
 

A lot of the major examples have already been covered, but I'm surprised no one has mentioned Don Dokken. This guy has fallen hard, one of the few to have lost his range on the level Geoff Tate has, if not worse. A really good demonstration is listening to the original "Dream Warriors" versus the re-recording. The arrangement had to be totally changed to accommodate his loss of range, which in the process totally neutered it.

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OpsiusCato
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 9:54 pm 
 

colin040 wrote:
Another example of someone who definitely paid the toll of his voice is Ray Alder. Granted, he was over excited singing very high back in the 80's/early 90's but he definitely lost the ability to do those shatter glass screams mostly nowadays, although I still like his voice quite a bit because he seems to know how to handle his singing despite not being the same as he was 20 years ago. Still, if only he actually learned how to control his high notes better with more training, I think could have ended up pretty well-aged.

The guy smokes over a pack a day, from what I remember reading.
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Element_man
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 1:31 pm 
 

Most of the older dudes who seem to "still got it" are probably using some sorta trickery to make it seem like they are sounding better than they are. I'd be willing to bet that King Diamond's backing vocalist is really the one hitting and sustaining the highs. And I wouldn't be totally surprised if there were some canned vocals helping out Eric Adams, though I could be wrong.

Fabio Leone from Rhapsody smokes like twelve packs a day and loves to drink and chat with fans and that motherfucker still manages to be in destructible. Sometimes it's just genetics I guess.

I've heard that Biff Byford lives (and probably has for much of his life) a healthy lifestyle which definitely contributes to the fact that his vocals in the 2000's-onward sound better than they ever did.
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OpsiusCato
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 7:15 pm 
 

Element_man wrote:
I'd be willing to bet that King Diamond's backing vocalist is really the one hitting and sustaining the highs.

Saw him live about two months ago. You'd lose if you did bet.
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Element_man
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 11:16 am 
 

OpsiusCato wrote:
Element_man wrote:
I'd be willing to bet that King Diamond's backing vocalist is really the one hitting and sustaining the highs.

Saw him live about two months ago. You'd lose if you did bet.
I hope I'm wrong. The gig I saw in 2014 looked a little suspect at certain moments. Didn't stop it from sounding great, of course.
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Ace_Rimmer
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 12:18 pm 
 

Ancient_Mariner wrote:
Having heard Phil live with Down twice, which requires little range compared to CFH and earlier Pantera I'd say he's pretty much lost his voice. He sounds terrible. Heck he can't even pull of NOLA stuff live.


Yeah, Phil's voice is totally shot. Seen Down a couple times and he was very rough, but watching vids of him "singing" Pantera stuff with even minimal clean vocals is painful. I think he was doing This Love maybe 4-5 years ago and holy shit was it painful.

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~Guest 319474
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 02, 2019 10:41 am 
 

Andi Deris has stopped to smoke.

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Eric Olthwaite

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 02, 2019 2:39 pm 
 

I think King Diamond's smoking is definitely evident in his voice by the time (ha!) you arrive at 1994's Time album. It's a great record, but he sounds a bit rough on it.
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GOOFAM
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Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2015 10:06 am
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 02, 2019 10:51 pm 
 

LefterisK wrote:
Metal Shark wrote:
Mistereyedee wrote:
Although not related to smoking (I don't think, at least), Warrel Dane sacrificed his epic voice to give us his band's only true classic: Refuge Denied.


he could have blown his voice out on BATTLE ANGELS alone! Love the song, though!


Ηis vocal range is indeed impressive! It sends shivers down your spine!

Youtube: show


Warrel Dane was a smoker, and it (along with a bunch of other things) contributed significantly to his voice and range getting way lower very quickly.

Ray Alder is a big one as has been mentioned. Geoff Tate and D.C. Cooper are in that mix too.

Mike Portnoy nearly fired James LaBrie from Dream Theater in 2002 because LaBrie had taken to smoking cigars.

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exsiccation
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Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2016 9:49 pm
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 02, 2019 11:52 pm 
 

Kind of interesting to read this older discussion and see what's changed in the meantime. What I've noticed:

- The recent live videos of King Diamond are really amazing sounding. He is arguably as good or better than on the original albums. The backing vocals are definitely not making that big a difference here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yd6_imr14A

- Rob Halford seems like he's doing better today than he was a decade ago. While he's obviously not at the level he was during his prime, his tone is still phenomenal and he seems way more energetic than the late 2000s and early 2010s. The screams in this one are nuts. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4d5sMg8eCE

I'm also going to be a bad person and say that I like old, gruff, boozy Russell Allen more than I do young Russell Allen.

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Flem Clone
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 03, 2019 3:21 am 
 

I absolutely love King Diamond, and I'm not trying to shit talk the man, but the audio on those officially released live videos has definitely been "altered" in post production. You can find videos of the same exact performances recorded by fans who were in attendance, and he doesn't sound as good in the fan videos. He still sounds relatively good, mind you. Just not as good.

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Empyreal
The Final Frontier

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 03, 2019 8:18 am 
 

exsiccation wrote:
I'm also going to be a bad person and say that I like old, gruff, boozy Russell Allen more than I do young Russell Allen.


Well he sounds fucking great on the last few albums. People who like deeper, throatier vocals in melodic metal will love it. Those addicted to high screams won't.

I think DC Cooper sounds good these days too. I like those deeper, richer vocal tones.
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Temple Of Blood
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:06 am 
 

Flem Clone wrote:
I absolutely love King Diamond, and I'm not trying to shit talk the man, but the audio on those officially released live videos has definitely been "altered" in post production. You can find videos of the same exact performances recorded by fans who were in attendance, and he doesn't sound as good in the fan videos. He still sounds relatively good, mind you. Just not as good.


That's par for the course though.

Few people prefer a real live recording over a fixed one, no matter what they claim.
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Flem Clone
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Joined: Sat Nov 08, 2014 11:10 am
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 03, 2019 12:56 pm 
 

Temple Of Blood wrote:
Flem Clone wrote:
I absolutely love King Diamond, and I'm not trying to shit talk the man, but the audio on those officially released live videos has definitely been "altered" in post production. You can find videos of the same exact performances recorded by fans who were in attendance, and he doesn't sound as good in the fan videos. He still sounds relatively good, mind you. Just not as good.


That's par for the course though.

Few people prefer a real live recording over a fixed one, no matter what they claim.

I understand. I'm skeptical that any officially released live recording is actually 100% genuinely live. I singled out King Diamond only because a couple of people were using the live video as evidence for how good he still sounds. He does sound good, but that video is somewhat misleading.

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