Encyclopaedia Metallum: The Metal Archives

Message board

* FAQ    * Search   * Register   * Login 



Reply to topic
Author Message Previous topic | Next topic
stainedclass2112
Veteran

Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2015 5:36 pm
Posts: 2535
Location: Bucketheadland
PostPosted: Mon Sep 02, 2019 10:23 pm 
 

So this is something I have very little experience with: folk metal. I'm a little curious as to what this means. I've always known that it's considered a legit metal genre by many, unlike things like "pirate metal" or "pizza thrash" or similar monikers, but y'know what exactly makes folk metal folk metal? I am a vicious despiser of the beer-y cheer-y kinda stuff like Korpiklaani or those other similar groups, and in my experience people like Alestorm make what's easily my least favorite metal style tbh. That said, I've been kind of shocked to find some stuff slotted into folk metal that sounds nothing like those groups I've heard before.

To put it bluntly, I've just discovered Equilibrium and I'm having a serious s t r o n k over how incredibly good they are. That said, this sounds like ripping melodeath with folky inspirations everywhere, aka nothing at all like the other things I'm used to associating with folk metal. Is this what folk metal is supposed to be or is this just very folky melodeath? Is folk metal one of those catch-all terms to describe a lot of various offshoots after all? Mayhaps it's just as easy as it is for black metal, where something can be "blackened" like thrash or doom, but part of me says just slapping some folk-inspired melodies and keyboards doesn't automatically make you "folk metal."

I'm curious as to who the stalwart groups are in this realm of things and what the bastard children are as well. Is it more accurate to just call some bands "folky melodeath" or "folky [insert genre here]"? Or is there an actual musical bloodline of folk metal like there is in thrash, doom, death, etc.?
_________________
raspberrysoda wrote:
It will make you piss in your goddamn pants. It has influences from thrash, grindcore, crossover, hardcore punk, and RUDOLPH THE FUCKING RED NOSED DEER

Top
 Profile  
Muhammadabbadabba
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 8:00 pm
Posts: 1177
Location: R'lyeh
PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2019 1:02 am 
 

I would say the Folk Metal of the late '90s / 2000s was popular with people who weren't terribly keen on bands celebrated by metalheads; same people who were into Gothenburg and Symphonic Metal, really. Every defining facet from the ultra clean production values to the simple chugs and epic Power Metal riffs was all handtailored to cater to those people's tastes and sensibilities. Throw in some Paganism along with vague nods to ancestral heritage and you've got fans for life. It wasn't always that way, and some of the earliest known Folk Metal bands were a far cry from the Finnish and Slavic scenes.

stainedclass2112 wrote:
Or is there an actual musical bloodline of folk metal like there is in thrash, doom, death, etc.?

I personally think the best way to study Folk Metal is to listen to bands from the very country they're from and their immediate neighbors before comparing others from the same period of time. A Folk Metal band from Russia, Ukraine or Belarus isn't going to sound like anything from Finland, Spain or the British Isles.

Despite Folk Metal's distinct style and image forged by bands in Finland and Eastern Europe (especially Ukraine and Russia), some of the earliest known acts to fuse Folk instrumentation with Metal hailed from Spain and the British Isles. Progressive Rock / Heavy Metal band Ñu and their 1983 album Fuego might be the Godfather of Folk Metal. Take note of the flutes on the title track, "La bailarina", "Los caballeros de hierro" and "La dama de la carroza negra «Nessa»". That very band inspired Mägo de Oz, who in turn can be singlehandedly credited for bringing Celtic Metal to the Hispanosphere. Their earlier work was mostly folky Hard Rock with the occasional nod to Metal, but Jesús de Chamberí and especially La leyenda de La Mancha would define their career. On the latter album, you can hear the riffs cycle between bouncy Heavy Metal and straight up Power Metal with fiddles chiming in intermittently. It's unlikely the Finnish, Slavic or even British/Irish scenes heard these bands, but it's still a notable development.

Meanwhile at the British Isles, Steve Ramsey of Satan/Pariah and Martin Walkyier of Sabbat would form Skyclad. Early on, they were quite thrashy with some nods to Folk music, but the release of A Burnt Offering for the Bone Idol along with the EP Tracks from the Wilderness contributed greatly to the development of Celtic Folk Metal. You also had Irish band Cruachan who were always known to fuse Metal with Celtic instrumentation. They started out playing Celtic Black Metal but gradually transitioned towards plain old Celtic Metal after recruiting Karen Gilligan on vocals. You can especially hear some of the Folk Metal motifs crop up during their midperiod. After Karen Gilligan left, Black Metal influences returned, but still a far cry from their early days. Waylander, on the other hand, always kept it blackened.

Then, there was Bathory and the Viking Metal period. Don't think I need to elaborate on how influential that was to the development of Folk Metal especially on account of its big, bombastic riffs and epic passages along with its Pagan themes. I wouldn't call any of those albums Folk Metal proper, but it doesn't take a genius to see how influential they were.
_________________
My Wanted List

Top
 Profile  
Voidsel
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sun Jun 16, 2019 4:15 am
Posts: 14
Location: Australia
PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2019 1:05 am 
 

It took me a while to distinguish folk from black, and there are plenty of black metal bands that use folk elements. To me folk derives from the more organic, less blasting/tremolo side of black and incorporates the folk elements throughout songs, as first-class instruments, not just as interludes. Like any sub-genre it then expands in it's own direction and becomes harder to define.

Not a genre expert but cheerful bands you hate like Korpiklaani/Finntroll are probably exemplar. I'm sure you're familiar with these, but on the serious side are Eluveitie (too folky for me), Moonsorrow (bordering on black) and Arkona (authentic and less gimmicky). Equilibrium are not over the top with folk either.

Alestorm are from the power metal side (and gimmick heavy, but I enjoy them in small doses), that's probably a separate stream of folk metal.

Top
 Profile  
Diplomate
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2019 7:04 pm
Posts: 202
PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2019 2:05 am 
 

stainedclass2112 wrote:
I'm curious as to who the stalwart groups are in this realm of things and what the bastard children are as well. Is it more accurate to just call some bands "folky melodeath" or "folky [insert genre here]"? Or is there an actual musical bloodline of folk metal like there is in thrash, doom, death, etc.?

Yes, folk metal is a catch-all term for bands that have folk influences. The base for their sound can be anything, but it's usually power metal, melodeath or viking/black metal.

I don't like those silly sounding bands like Finntroll and Korpiklaani. If you don't like the "beer-y cheer-y" kind of folk metal, check out the more serious bands:
Moonsorrow (black/viking metal), Falkenbach (black/viking metal), Temnozor (NSBM).

Top
 Profile  
Morn Of Solace
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Apr 01, 2014 2:19 am
Posts: 1490
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2019 2:24 am 
 

I still don't know why Finntroll are commonly dumped in the same beer-hole as Korpiklaani, as far as i can remember they are far more complex and riff-focused than them, and the bouncy stuff isn't always the main thing

On the topic of great sounding bands Skyforger and Obtest (the last album in particular, wich is incredible) to me are the ones that truly managed the mix of pure metal riffing with the folk influences. If i would have to help a fan of heavy/thrash getting into the genre those two would be the bands i would show

Top
 Profile  
joppek
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2011 7:36 am
Posts: 1653
Location: Suomi Finland Perkele
PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2019 3:29 am 
 

i'd also add that usually when people talk about folk metal they refer to metal that's fused with scandinavian, celtic, or otherwise european folk, but obviously there's a lot of different folk music all around the world, so you also have bands like melechesh, al-namrood (middle eastern folk), tengger cavalry (mongolian/chinese), chthonic (taiwanese), etc. that obviously sound quite different
_________________
All the best bands are affiliated with Satan. -Bart Simpson

Top
 Profile  
Diplomate
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2019 7:04 pm
Posts: 202
PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2019 3:36 am 
 

Morn Of Solace wrote:
I still don't know why Finntroll are commonly dumped in the same beer-hole as Korpiklaani, as far as i can remember they are far more complex and riff-focused than them, and the bouncy stuff isn't always the main thing

On the topic of great sounding bands Skyforger and Obtest (the last album in particular, wich is incredible) to me are the ones that truly managed the mix of pure metal riffing with the folk influences. If i would have to help a fan of heavy/thrash getting into the genre those two would be the bands i would show

I see your point. They aren't as silly as Korpiklaani, but to me they sound like the "beer" version of Moonsorrow.

Top
 Profile  
Damballah
Metal newbie

Joined: Thu Jul 05, 2012 8:12 pm
Posts: 109
PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2019 1:40 pm 
 

Melechesh is a really good Folk metal band, you should check them out.

Theres not much about to say as an answer. Folk Metal is metal that uses regional music or melodies in their music. For example a band like Alestorm is pretty much Power Metal but they use scottish and irish Folk (noz sure if authentic) to give their music that Pirate feel.

Folk can be mixed in any Metal genre. It's just a term to desrcibe regional music from a country.

I despise Viking Metal, i think a lot of bands have no idea how Viking Music sounded unless they went to university and studied archeology. Most Viking Metal is just Folk Metal. Folk Melodies from all around Scandinavia or Finland.

As stated theres nots of different Folk black Metal bands all over the world. Al Namrood from Saudi Arabia, Darkestrah with their Mongolian Folk Elements, Kawir with their ancient Greek Folk Melodies and so on and so on.

Theres even Folk Black Metal from Italia.

Check it out:
Youtube: show

Top
 Profile  
Diplomate
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2019 7:04 pm
Posts: 202
PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2019 2:00 pm 
 

Damballah wrote:
I despise Viking Metal, i think a lot of bands have no idea how Viking Music sounded unless they went to university and studied archeology. Most Viking Metal is just Folk Metal. Folk Melodies from all around Scandinavia or Finland.

Well, it wasn't meant to sound like Viking music and Viking metal is not necessarily connected with folk metal. Bathory was Viking metal, but I wouldn't say he played folk metal. Viking metal and folk metal are different genres, with viking metal predating folk.

Top
 Profile  
Smoking_Gnu
Chicago Favorite

Joined: Sat Mar 15, 2008 11:22 pm
Posts: 4557
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2019 4:50 pm 
 

Morn Of Solace wrote:
I still don't know why Finntroll are commonly dumped in the same beer-hole as Korpiklaani, as far as i can remember they are far more complex and riff-focused than them, and the bouncy stuff isn't always the main thing.


As a huge fan of both bands (and folk metal in general) back in the 2000s, I'd say that was largely because Finntroll's most visible albums for the longest time were Jaktens Tid and Nattfod. JT in particular was pretty repetitive, "bouncy," and had some annoying keyboard lines, and I didn't listen to it very often even though I was generally a fan of the style. The band really started getting it together with Ur Jordens Djup, which I think was mostly due to better production values and Trollhorn's improvements as a songwriter, but at that point the damage had already been done.

Even Korpiklaani is capable of getting it together and putting out a consistently great album (BastardHead's review of Manala pretty much sums up my feelings on it) but they have this annoying quantity-over-quality habit throughout the rest of their discography where they just dump out albums with a handful of good tracks and a lot of bland background noise.
_________________
demonomania wrote:
A gritty "Leprechaun In the IRA" reboot sounds pretty awesome, actually. Sample line - "Come have a taste of me lucky ARMS!"

NEW Valcove album Forge @ https://valcove.bandcamp.com/album/forge. For fans of Aphex Twin, Autechre, ambient techno

Top
 Profile  
amelanchier
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Nov 09, 2009 8:27 pm
Posts: 136
Location: I den trolska dalens hjärta
PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2019 10:35 pm 
 

I have a slightly narrower view of "folk metal" than most other posters on this thread. In my view it doesn't count as folk metal unless it uses traditional melodic instruments extensively. Folk influences in the composition don't suffice. So Mago de Oz, Skyclad, Cruachan, Eluveitie, Korpiklaani, and Silent Stream of Godless Elegy are folk metal, but Bathory, Primordial, Forefather, etc. are not. In the same way, a metal band influenced by Mozart wouldn't be considered "symphonic metal" unless they used symphonic instrumentation.

BTW, Silent Stream of Godless Elegy is one of the most underrated metal bands around and definitely worth checking out for anyone interested in "serious" folk metal. Female vocals, excellent cello performances, good use of dissonance, and fresh melodic ideas, some reminiscent of Bartok's folkier compositions.

Top
 Profile  
amelanchier
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Nov 09, 2009 8:27 pm
Posts: 136
Location: I den trolska dalens hjärta
PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2019 10:38 pm 
 

Youtube: show

Top
 Profile  
Diplomate
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2019 7:04 pm
Posts: 202
PostPosted: Thu Sep 05, 2019 12:59 am 
 

amelanchier wrote:
I have a slightly narrower view of "folk metal" than most other posters on this thread. In my view it doesn't count as folk metal unless it uses traditional melodic instruments extensively. Folk influences in the composition don't suffice. So Mago de Oz, Skyclad, Cruachan, Eluveitie, Korpiklaani, and Silent Stream of Godless Elegy are folk metal, but Bathory, Primordial, Forefather, etc. are not. In the same way, a metal band influenced by Mozart wouldn't be considered "symphonic metal" unless they used symphonic instrumentation.

I don't think anyone here considers Bathory folk metal. No folk influences in the music at all, apart from the acoustic guitars.
I haven't heard Primordial and Forefather, but if they are like that, then it's not folk metal.

Top
 Profile  
Opus
Veteran

Joined: Sun Sep 22, 2002 11:06 am
Posts: 2886
Location: Sweden
PostPosted: Thu Sep 05, 2019 2:44 pm 
 

I'd say the first Týr album is pure folk metal. And they don't have any traditional instruments. They do have traditional melodies though.
As far as I remember they became more "normal" prog/folk as the albums passed.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ySFbudnHEWM
_________________
Do the words Heavy Metal mean anything to you other than buttcore, technical progressive assgrind or the like?
true_death wrote:
You could be listening to Edge of Sanity right now, but you're not!

Top
 Profile  
blackmantram
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2010 12:51 pm
Posts: 514
Location: Colombia
PostPosted: Thu Sep 05, 2019 3:44 pm 
 

Folk metal is supposed to be metal mixed with folk music or the other way around. It doesn't really have to do with mood, you can have a sad folk tune and add in metal riffs and you've got a folk metal song.

Top
 Profile  
abyss696
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2006 2:50 pm
Posts: 24
Location: Spain
PostPosted: Thu Sep 05, 2019 4:55 pm 
 

For me, the purest folk metal band will always be Primordial, they just took pure irish folk scales and tempos and fused them with a unique view on heavy metal and black metal. They aren't the average happy jiggling dancing folk metal band with flutes and bagpipes and all that stuff, they use only classic metal instrumentation and they can sound really bleak sometimes. The Gathering Wilderness will be a good starting point, being my favourite along with To The Nameless Dead.

Top
 Profile  
Amerigo
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 11:30 pm
Posts: 284
Location: United States of America
PostPosted: Thu Sep 05, 2019 6:34 pm 
 

abyss696 wrote:
They aren't the average happy jiggling dancing folk metal band with flutes and bagpipes and all that stuff, they use only classic metal instrumentation and they can sound really bleak sometimes.


But if they're not the average are they a good example of the genre? I think not. Don't get me wrong, I love Primordial, but part of the reason for that is because they are so different from both the typical folk metal band AND the typical black metal band.

I think the typical folk metal band does have to be a bit dance-y, considering the overwhelming majority of folk songs ARE danced to. Sure, you have some ballads and the like, but that's very much in the minority.
_________________
"The answer cannot be found
In the writing of others"

--"Empty Words" Symbolic, Death

Top
 Profile  
abyss696
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2006 2:50 pm
Posts: 24
Location: Spain
PostPosted: Thu Sep 05, 2019 6:47 pm 
 

Yes, I agree with you in that Primordial are a pretty unique band, but they should be a good example of the genre, and what I mean with this is that I wish that more bands would take the same path. Instead, what you get is Korpiklaani, Alestorm, Mägo de Oz and similar stuff that sounds awful to me.

Top
 Profile  
Morn Of Solace
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Apr 01, 2014 2:19 am
Posts: 1490
Location: Italy
PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2019 8:10 am 
 

abyss696 wrote:
Yes, I agree with you in that Primordial are a pretty unique band, but they should be a good example of the genre, and what I mean with this is that I wish that more bands would take the same path. Instead, what you get is Korpiklaani, Alestorm, Mägo de Oz and similar stuff that sounds awful to me.


Tyr take a similar path as most of their riffs are taken directly from Faroese, Danish and Irish music. Some of their songs are bouncy as the original melody, but overall really well done (like the Lord Of Lies intro)

Same thing with Windir and Storm, the majority of their guitar melodies are pure norwegian folk. I considered them very cheesy for a long time, but lately i'm appreciating a lot more their approach

On the topic of well done folk metal: i'm listening the first Asmegin record and i'm impressed. Lots of good melodies and interesting vocal work

Top
 Profile  
PeteGas
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Jun 04, 2003 2:34 pm
Posts: 67
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2019 10:25 am 
 

Diplomate wrote:
amelanchier wrote:
I have a slightly narrower view of "folk metal" than most other posters on this thread. In my view it doesn't count as folk metal unless it uses traditional melodic instruments extensively. Folk influences in the composition don't suffice. So Mago de Oz, Skyclad, Cruachan, Eluveitie, Korpiklaani, and Silent Stream of Godless Elegy are folk metal, but Bathory, Primordial, Forefather, etc. are not. In the same way, a metal band influenced by Mozart wouldn't be considered "symphonic metal" unless they used symphonic instrumentation.

I don't think anyone here considers Bathory folk metal. No folk influences in the music at all, apart from the acoustic guitars.
I haven't heard Primordial and Forefather, but if they are like that, then it's not folk metal.

My takeaway from this is that you need to go check out some Primordial! Fantastic band.

Top
 Profile  
Diplomate
Metal newbie

Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2019 7:04 pm
Posts: 202
PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2019 11:21 am 
 

PeteGas wrote:
My takeaway from this is that you need to go check out some Primordial! Fantastic band.

Yeah, I'll definitely do that when I'm in the mood for some folk. :)

Top
 Profile  
amelanchier
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Nov 09, 2009 8:27 pm
Posts: 136
Location: I den trolska dalens hjärta
PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 6:01 pm 
 

Opus wrote:
I'd say the first Týr album is pure folk metal. And they don't have any traditional instruments. They do have traditional melodies though.
As far as I remember they became more "normal" prog/folk as the albums passed.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ySFbudnHEWM


Good counterexample. TYR might be the exception that proves the rule, as they actually play renditions of traditional folk songs on some of their albums. Still, I'd resist "folk metal" as their primary genre category, just as I'd resist slotting Mekong Delta into "neoclassical metal" even though they play renditions of 19th century symphonic pieces.

Top
 Profile  
amelanchier
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Nov 09, 2009 8:27 pm
Posts: 136
Location: I den trolska dalens hjärta
PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 6:03 pm 
 

Diplomate wrote:
PeteGas wrote:
My takeaway from this is that you need to go check out some Primordial! Fantastic band.

Yeah, I'll definitely do that when I'm in the mood for some folk. :)


They're less folk-inspired than a band like TYR, but it does creep in consistently. Hammerheart-era Bathory might be the strongest influence, but they've really developed their own unique style. I believe _To the Nameless Dead_ was widely seen on this forum as one of the top albums of any genre of the 2000s.

Top
 Profile  
wednesdaysixx
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 20, 2015 5:09 pm
Posts: 138
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 3:36 am 
 

Honestly, I find folk metal with harsh vocals or “straighter” vocals instantly more likeable than the big choruses we associate with those cheesy bands and fields of fans with Viking horns singing along. This morning I looked up a folk metal playlist and Primordial, Skyclad, Vintersorg, Månegarm, Falconer, Agalloch, Moonsorrow, Arkona and The Hu are amongst the ones that I like (or like considerably more).

Edit: I think the same is true of my preferences in the realm of power metal. I prefer stuff that’s gruffer or more like traditional/classic metal or is almost something else more extreme or experimental to the more popular/catchy/beer-swilling pizza-eating type stuff. If I’m envisioning fist-pumping drunks in a field in mainland Europe loving it and singing along with it all whilst jousting round the camps, it’s probably not for me.


Last edited by wednesdaysixx on Sun Sep 08, 2019 4:51 am, edited 1 time in total.
Top
 Profile  
InnesI
Metalhead

Joined: Sat Jun 01, 2013 3:19 pm
Posts: 1284
PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 4:45 am 
 

abyss696 wrote:
For me, the purest folk metal band will always be Primordial, they just took pure irish folk scales and tempos and fused them with a unique view on heavy metal and black metal. They aren't the average happy jiggling dancing folk metal band with flutes and bagpipes and all that stuff, they use only classic metal instrumentation and they can sound really bleak sometimes. The Gathering Wilderness will be a good starting point, being my favourite along with To The Nameless Dead.


I love folk (both metal and other variations) but generally not so much when it goes the happy humty-dumpty route (like most metal bands tend to do). Primordial is a great example where it is clearly folk influenced but they have taken the part of folk music best suited for metal. Namely the sad glooming part which often dominated traditional folk. They also use folk and metal in a way that makes both of the genres work together rather than have a traditional metal type riff with a folky (often happy) melody stuck on top like so many other bands do. Drudkh manages to do the same thing on some of their stuff. Satyricon uses folk tonality excellently from time to time. Agalloch does as well. The second Myrkur album is pretty great with the folk influences and Negură Bunget did it awesomely. My favourite album of their being Vîrstele Pamîntului. Grifts Syner should also be mentioned.

Not quite the style I describe above but Orphaned Land are worth checking out. The blend of the different styles are done masterfully in their music. OM has a great and unique take on folk and metal on their album Advaitic Songs for example.

Top
 Profile  
amelanchier
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Nov 09, 2009 8:27 pm
Posts: 136
Location: I den trolska dalens hjärta
PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2019 8:34 pm 
 

^Nice observations. I'm not previously familiar with Grifts or OM. Orphaned Land has put out some truly awesome work indeed. _Mabool_ I think will probably always be their masterpiece, but last year's _Unsung Prophets_ is also excellent, and the title track from _All Is One_ might be their best song. They *do* use some folk instrumentation, although they've slotted themselves more and more into the progressive metal genre.

Top
 Profile  
InnesI
Metalhead

Joined: Sat Jun 01, 2013 3:19 pm
Posts: 1284
PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2019 3:31 am 
 

amelanchier wrote:
^Nice observations. I'm not previously familiar with Grifts or OM. Orphaned Land has put out some truly awesome work indeed. _Mabool_ I think will probably always be their masterpiece, but last year's _Unsung Prophets_ is also excellent, and the title track from _All Is One_ might be their best song. They *do* use some folk instrumentation, although they've slotted themselves more and more into the progressive metal genre.


I've been meaning to check out more of Orphaned Land. I adore All is One and I like the latest album Unsung Prophets & Dead Messiahs. I gave Kna'an a chance but it didn't stick with me - although I only heard it once or twice. Yes, they are generally thought of as progressive but they are very folk influenced throughout both of the albums I'm familiar with.

As for Grift it is not folk influences throughout but the interludes are clearly folk inspired and one of my favourite songs, Det Bortvända Ansiktet, is leaning heavily on that traditional folk feeling and tonality

Top
 Profile  
Jose Cruz
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2019 12:13 pm
Posts: 15
Location: Brazil
PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2019 2:29 pm 
 

My favorite band classified as folk metal is, by far, Ensiferum. Like, it is not even comparable: my favorite non-Ensiferum folk albums (which are basically by Equilibrium and Falkenbach) I find it about 10 times weaker than their best albums. When I watched then live they were so amazing and almost humiliated the other bands they were touring with (which I will not mention). They are truly an exceptional band and play at a far higher level than anybody else.

Top
 Profile  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: abyss696, CarlLSanders, Kennermahn, Subrick, Unorthodox and 18 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

  Print view
Jump to:  

Back to the Encyclopaedia Metallum


Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group