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RakdosWarlord
Metal newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 10, 2017 4:26 am
Posts: 156
Location: United States
PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2019 3:48 am 
 

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=k2nwioKr3o0
Watching this video brought up some things I have been thinking for a while. I don't really think rock and metal are dying or going away any time soon but, there has been a shift away from metal. I was in high school in the mid 00's when there was a split between metal and rock fans vs rap fans. Rap was more popular by the time I graduated. Metal has always been more underground but rock seems to be less and less popular with younger people.

I think part of it is what sells and is cheaper to produce. Bands cost more than one singular person. Plus with the cost of instruments and the potential for bands to fight and break up. (When rappers fight they profit from diss tracks)

I'm 30 now so I don't count as young anymore but I do care about the future of metal. The video made me come to realize a lot of my favorite bands are at least 20 years old. I don't often hear of newer bands and with metal being not heavily promoted finding new things to listen to can be hard. There are positives to less exposure to the genre - it keeps things more genuine because people are less in it for the money. As someone else mentioned 'the old guard is getting greyer' and were talking about bands that fizzled out. viewtopic.php?f=1&t=125132

I have a feeling that with all the rap music going mumble and pop being uninspired and generic as of late metal might just be a breath of fresh air if newer bands that connect with younger people got support.

I also think that there has to be a balance because it things get too popular then things stop being genuine. I do think metal has a defense against this being that a lot of it is controversial and that makes mainstream media shy away. While I do like metal not being super popular it has to stay relevant in some ways. I don't think I would have ever gotten here if I didn't listen to popular rock bands and continue down the rabbit hole. How else are people going to find out about metal?

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Miikja
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Aug 14, 2006 5:36 pm
Posts: 41
PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2019 6:53 am 
 

About that video... An effective strategy to attract viewers is exaggerating whatever it is you want to bring up. So if there's fewer rock fans than say, 25 years ago, just claim that 'rock is dying' (in CAPITALS, of course). It generates a reaction, maybe a debate ensues. Which is fine but it's not like we're discussing a peer-reviewed scientific article.

Yes, it can be quite expensive to have a rock band and tour. Making electronic music on your own is definitely cheaper and more efficient. But you can't beat the fun and excitement of playing in a group. I don't think anybody will argue that. So that's one of rock's selling points. Also, I think it may just be a matter of time before audiences start to experience 'electro fatigue' and long again for guitar-driven sounds ("breath of fresh air"). Popularity comes in waves and with it the new blood.

One usually finds out about metal through friends or family. Maybe online too, though it seems to me that the internet is great in just finding you more of what you already know. Mtv's Headbanger's Ball probably exposed a lot of people to metal back in the day, that's the charm of television broadcasting. My mum actually told me last night she watched Floor Jansen on a Dutch tv-show (Beste Zangers/Best Singers) and how weird it is that Nightwish is huge internationally but our mainstream media hardly pick up on that. I wonder what it's like in Finland, where metal is a lot bigger. In any case, one shouldn't rely on mainstream media for bringing in fresh blood to the scene. If it happens, it will be accidental.

That said, some festivals get so big that media automatically gravitate toward the event. As for my country, I'm thinking about the old Dynamo Open Air festival which at its peak caused some chaos (heavy metal traffic jam!) or present-day Roadburn. When people hear about these events, they might get curious and read more about it. You could also argue that the esthetic qualities of heavy metal culture draw people in. So keep wearing those band shirts. I got super interested in Iron Maiden because they had the most impressive posters and t-shirts. It's great promotion.

I have no problem whatsoever with metal staying in the underground. It seems to me that there is a ton of new releases every week, much more than I can keep track of anyway. It's a scene that evolves and thrives on itself, without any significant promotion from outside. Perhaps the strength lies not so much in having a few big 'relevant' bands but more in the scene as a whole. It's certainly relevant to the people in it. I trust that the self-sufficiency will also appeal to the kids who feel that they belong here.
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droneriot
incelgender

Joined: Sat Aug 28, 2004 1:17 pm
Posts: 8981
Location: Spahn Ranch
PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2019 10:03 am 
 

Man people have a short attention span. How long ago was it that a pretty popular show on Adult Swim (Metalocalypse) and a pretty popular video game (Brutal Legend) were based on metal? I guess there was a complete nosedive into complete obscurity in the handful of years since that and no one noticed until the guy who made the video did.
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jimbies
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Jul 21, 2016 2:52 pm
Posts: 1425
Location: Ontario, Canada
PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2019 10:10 am 
 

I have no scientific proof or any way to back up my wild claim, but I'd argue metal is bigger now than it was 20 years ago when I was in high school. (I can't believe I was in high school 20 years ago holy FUCKING CRISIS)

But yeah, I mean in the time span of 1999-2002, finding an In Flames record where I lived was a chore. Bands that are now selling out bigger clubs and halls were struggling to play in small bars. I remember seeing Opeth in early 2006 in a bar that held a couple hundred people and they had Devin Townsend and Dark Tranquillity opening. I know there are still thousands and thousands of bands playing small bars, so like I said I have no scientific proof of any of this, but it seems generally bigger to me now.

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droneriot
incelgender

Joined: Sat Aug 28, 2004 1:17 pm
Posts: 8981
Location: Spahn Ranch
PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2019 10:11 am 
 

1999-2002 was when it started getting really big around here because that's around when all the big festivals started.
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ModusOperandi
Metalhead

Joined: Thu May 06, 2010 12:52 am
Posts: 1405
PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2019 10:56 am 
 

Metal is fine, and there's probably not a good reason for it to be any more mainstream than it is thanks to how music and information is cultivated and curated through this very user-friendly internet.

You see all those FM radio rock bands and tired parodies of metal in pop culture? There would just be even more of them than there's already been. That's all the industry will allow for, and that's all the most average common denominator can handle.
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BURlAL
Metalhead

Joined: Fri May 21, 2010 11:32 pm
Posts: 462
PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2019 2:38 pm 
 

Neither, metal just isnt meant to be mainstream.

I think Ozzys guest vocals on that pop/rap dudes song is all the proof we need. If your average person doesnt know who Ozzy is by now, after his long/successful career, then theres no hope for metal.

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Twisted_Psychology
Metal freak

Joined: Sat May 16, 2009 8:22 pm
Posts: 4730
Location: United States
PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2019 3:46 pm 
 

BURlAL wrote:
I think Ozzys guest vocals on that pop/rap dudes song is all the proof we need. If your average person doesnt know who Ozzy is by now, after his long/successful career, then theres no hope for metal.


So did you talk to any actual people who didn't recognize Ozzy or are you just going by strawmen on Facebook and Twitter?
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