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Collarbones
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Fri May 22, 2020 9:57 pm
Posts: 14
Location: United States
PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2020 11:40 pm 
 

I just wanted to reach out to any other military on here. I know we got a very international and diverse community here, so I wanted to ask those that either did time in the military or are currently in how you feel/felt about it?

I've been in the us army 4 years now and I should be getting kicked out soon. My experience hasn't been bad but I know I need to leave. I don't regret joining and I've made some lifelong friends and done some cool stuff but I cannot wait to stretch my limbs a little more freely in the civilian sector than here in the complex.
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BastardHead
Worse than Stalin

Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 7:53 pm
Posts: 9635
Location: St. Charles, Illinois
PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2020 12:54 am 
 

Shortest version: I was in the Navy for about a month. I don't like the military, as an American I hated the idea of joining the World Police, but it was a last ditch effort to avoid living out of my car. Tried to join the Army first, got rejected because I've got a googly eye. Tried the Navy next and they didn't care. Still lied on my medical history and got busted a week into boot camp. Spent three weeks in Seps waiting to go home. Learned nothing, gained nothing, all in all just a really bizarre month long detour in my life. The best part was discovering the various reasons people were getting kicked out (personal favorite was the guy who had six toes on either feet so none of the boots fit, which is hilarious to me because he was probably a great swimmer). Other best part is that my reentry code is RE-04, which means I can never join again under any circumstances, even a draft. So whenever WWIII breaks out I'll be sitting in my apartment playing videogames and not shooting people.
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infinitenexus
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 2:35 am
Posts: 1894
PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2020 1:30 am 
 

I did 12 years in the Army. I was planning on doing my 20 and retiring but I got injured. I medically retired with a 70% disability rating, which pays the mortgage, and left to join the world of civilians. I'll say this, I was never a military person, always was a bit of a "rebel" and metalhead, but somehow lasted that long and made E6 (twice, lol). Since I retired I've had my issues finding employment but I've settled into a good solid job and next week I'm talking to the VA for some training to get an even better job (IT). My back, knees, and left shoulder ache all the time but overall I would say it was worth it. I learned a ton of neat things, made a few lifetime friends, I have a small monthly bit that'll pay my mortgage... No complaints here. Had I stayed 20, I probably would have had some complaints, just to be honest. I was really over the whole military lifestyle at the time I retired.

That being said, if my kid wants to join, I'll tell them go air force or coast guard, reap every single benefit (that GI bill is absolutely amazing) and enjoy their time. If there's one bit of advice I can give, it's this: take advantage of everything you can while you're in: especially the tuition repayment thingy. Go to college now while you're in, do night classes. They'll cover it. When you get out you'll be more than on your way to a degree that'll get you a solid paying job. Go into IT, it pays a shit ton. Or finance. Use every bit of the GI bill, it's fucking great. When you're on the way out and have your interview with the VA, make sure you mention literally every single injury you've had. Get some sort of disability rating. You'll get some cash for the rest of your life. The VA also has some good vocational programs, similar the the GI bill.
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droneriot
incelgender

Joined: Sat Aug 28, 2004 1:17 pm
Posts: 10079
Location: Spahn Ranch
PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2020 1:47 am 
 

First time I went to therapy I shared the room with a veteran who was there for PTSD/insomnia, apparently had the issue that he remembered the faces of people he killed and I hear that's pretty common.
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praey
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Apr 20, 2008 1:33 am
Posts: 680
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2020 2:14 am 
 

I served for eight years in the U.S. Coast Guard and separated last month. To be honest, my experience was largely negative and I would have separated way sooner if I hadn’t accepted an offer for a graduate school program that extended my obligated service.

There were a lot of things I didn’t like about the Coast Guard, but one of the biggest was how poor the infrastructure was. The first ship (or “cutter,” as we called them) that I served on was commissioned in the mid-1960s, so you can only imagine how often our machinery broke. I know of at least one cutter where technicians would literally have to search for replacement parts on eBay because the companies that made those parts had long since gone out of business. Our IT infrastructure was just as bad. Our computers consistently ran extremely slow, critical applications would frequently not work, and network connectivity at sea was a joke.

I made the mistake of doing two afloat tours back to back which basically locked me into that career path. By the time I finished my second shipboard assignment I had no interest in ever setting foot on a Coast Guard cutter again. It didn’t help that the command climates were pretty poor at both units. It’s one thing to have a dickhead boss, it’s another to be stuck with that person for two months without a break while driving circles in the ocean and pulling 16+ hour days. I also hated having to move so often. In my eight years of service, I changed addresses nine times. By the end I was sick of it and just wanted to put down roots somewhere.

That said, I have to echo the sentiments of the gentleman above and say that the military does offer some very good benefits. Because I got accepted into a graduate school program, the Coast Guard not only paid for my master’s degree, but even continued paying my salary while I was in school. As a veteran there are also plenty of benefits available; the GI bill is an insanely good deal and I’m planning to use that to go back to school this fall. If all goes well, in three years I will have two post-graduate degrees in addition to my bachelor’s degree, none of which I paid a cent for. The Coast Guard also offered some unparalleled experiences. By the time I was 26 I had been to every major coastal city in the continental U.S. along with many foreign countries, which is definitely not something most people from my hometown could say.

Would I do it again? I don’t know, I had a lot of great experiences, met some awesome people, and the benefits are unreal. At the same time, I was miserable for many years and to be honest, while I received very good evaluations in all my assignments, I don’t think I was ever a good fit for the military. I’m excited to be a civilian now and start a new chapter of my life. As final bit of advice and to echo what was said above, definitely make sure to get any medical conditions you have documented before you leave the service. If you have any conditions that qualify for disability, I’d recommend getting with a Veterans Service Officer to help you with the claim.

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Face_your_fear_79
Metal newbie

Joined: Sun Sep 21, 2014 8:18 am
Posts: 343
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2020 4:07 am 
 

16+ hour days. No thank you I will stay a civilian.

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Unorthodox
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 8:08 pm
Posts: 1700
PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2020 4:41 am 
 

Both my best friends did the military. One is still in it, the other got discharged. The one who is still in it treats it like any other job. He's an engineer, but he's had to deploy in various places a few times (worst place being Afghanistan this last summer). Paid for his school, gives him a decent paycheck. Can't lie, seems like a pretty good gig. I never did because I had no reason to, although sometimes I contemplate if I should've. I think I could've done well in it, but again- had no reason to. Plus I'm not too big into how bloated our military is. Just seems like excess spending with meager return. We'd do better as a country spending a lot of that money on healthcare and education.
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last_eulogy
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2003 4:17 pm
Posts: 16
PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2020 10:27 am 
 

I did 9 years honorably in the Navy. I absolutely hated it at the time and despise it now. Some good things are I've been to 42 countries and was able to navigate/steer big giant war ships. Saw a million other cool things like missile launches, 5 inch gunfire and some other interesting things. They don't outweigh the assholes I had to deal with, no sleep literally for days (record is 72 hours), and long periods underway of no fresh water (drinking, showering, cooking) record for that is 24 days. I tried getting out, but realized my life was still shit and ended up reenlisting. I am now a 70 percenter through the VA. Among an experience of my first ship practically sawing a guy in half with an M60 "accidentally" I am damaged from participating in about 200 funeral details. A good chunk coming back from Iraq, which was in full swing at the time. Had zero mental health issues before I went in. I have destroyed countless friendships, relationships and marriages from my issues. Horrible anxiety and nightmares every night. I finally reached a point where I now have no one. Literally. destroyed every relationship. I went for counseling, but they locked me up. I wont go back. The VA can have all the money back for my sanity. I wish I had never ever gone in the military. My life was shit, but its shit now, except I have a house, nice car and money. Which mean nothing to me, compared to my lost sanity/love/friendsips.

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Collarbones
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Fri May 22, 2020 9:57 pm
Posts: 14
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2020 10:49 am 
 

BastardHead wrote:
Shortest version: I was in the Navy for about a month. I don't like the military, as an American I hated the idea of joining the World Police, but it was a last ditch effort to avoid living out of my car. Tried to join the Army first, got rejected because I've got a googly eye. Tried the Navy next and they didn't care. Still lied on my medical history and got busted a week into boot camp. Spent three weeks in Seps waiting to go home. Learned nothing, gained nothing, all in all just a really bizarre month long detour in my life. The best part was discovering the various reasons people were getting kicked out (personal favorite was the guy who had six toes on either feet so none of the boots fit, which is hilarious to me because he was probably a great swimmer). Other best part is that my reentry code is RE-04, which means I can never join again under any circumstances, even a draft. So whenever WWIII breaks out I'll be sitting in my apartment playing videogames and not shooting people.


When you say googly eye; do you mean you have a fake/glass eye or you got something like a lazy eye?
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Collarbones
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Fri May 22, 2020 9:57 pm
Posts: 14
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2020 10:56 am 
 

infinitenexus wrote:
I did 12 years in the Army. I was planning on doing my 20 and retiring but I got injured. I medically retired with a 70% disability rating, which pays the mortgage, and left to join the world of civilians. I'll say this, I was never a military person, always was a bit of a "rebel" and metalhead, but somehow lasted that long and made E6 (twice, lol). Since I retired I've had my issues finding employment but I've settled into a good solid job and next week I'm talking to the VA for some training to get an even better job (IT). My back, knees, and left shoulder ache all the time but overall I would say it was worth it. I learned a ton of neat things, made a few lifetime friends, I have a small monthly bit that'll pay my mortgage... No complaints here. Had I stayed 20, I probably would have had some complaints, just to be honest. I was really over the whole military lifestyle at the time I retired.

That being said, if my kid wants to join, I'll tell them go air force or coast guard, reap every single benefit (that GI bill is absolutely amazing) and enjoy their time. If there's one bit of advice I can give, it's this: take advantage of everything you can while you're in: especially the tuition repayment thingy. Go to college now while you're in, do night classes. They'll cover it. When you get out you'll be more than on your way to a degree that'll get you a solid paying job. Go into IT, it pays a shit ton. Or finance. Use every bit of the GI bill, it's fucking great. When you're on the way out and have your interview with the VA, make sure you mention literally every single injury you've had. Get some sort of disability rating. You'll get some cash for the rest of your life. The VA also has some good vocational programs, similar the the GI bill.


I have no clue how people do 2 decades or more of this; I feel like just being in slowly drains your soul.

I reenlisted about a year ago to for schools ops so I could train for SFAS during the 5 months or so and it was a good move. That year was still one of the worst of my life but I was able to do a semester as a full time student and not have to to go to my unit so it worked out pretty well. Defintely looking forward to using my gi bill!
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Collarbones
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Fri May 22, 2020 9:57 pm
Posts: 14
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2020 11:04 am 
 

praey wrote:
I served for eight years in the U.S. Coast Guard and separated last month. To be honest, my experience was largely negative and I would have separated way sooner if I hadn’t accepted an offer for a graduate school program that extended my obligated service.

There were a lot of things I didn’t like about the Coast Guard, but one of the biggest was how poor the infrastructure was. The first ship (or “cutter,” as we called them) that I served on was commissioned in the mid-1960s, so you can only imagine how often our machinery broke. I know of at least one cutter where technicians would literally have to search for replacement parts on eBay because the companies that made those parts had long since gone out of business. Our IT infrastructure was just as bad. Our computers consistently ran extremely slow, critical applications would frequently not work, and network connectivity at sea was a joke.

I made the mistake of doing two afloat tours back to back which basically locked me into that career path. By the time I finished my second shipboard assignment I had no interest in ever setting foot on a Coast Guard cutter again. It didn’t help that the command climates were pretty poor at both units. It’s one thing to have a dickhead boss, it’s another to be stuck with that person for two months without a break while driving circles in the ocean and pulling 16+ hour days. I also hated having to move so often. In my eight years of service, I changed addresses nine times. By the end I was sick of it and just wanted to put down roots somewhere.

That said, I have to echo the sentiments of the gentleman above and say that the military does offer some very good benefits. Because I got accepted into a graduate school program, the Coast Guard not only paid for my master’s degree, but even continued paying my salary while I was in school. As a veteran there are also plenty of benefits available; the GI bill is an insanely good deal and I’m planning to use that to go back to school this fall. If all goes well, in three years I will have two post-graduate degrees in addition to my bachelor’s degree, none of which I paid a cent for. The Coast Guard also offered some unparalleled experiences. By the time I was 26 I had been to every major coastal city in the continental U.S. along with many foreign countries, which is definitely not something most people from my hometown could say.

Would I do it again? I don’t know, I had a lot of great experiences, met some awesome people, and the benefits are unreal. At the same time, I was miserable for many years and to be honest, while I received very good evaluations in all my assignments, I don’t think I was ever a good fit for the military. I’m excited to be a civilian now and start a new chapter of my life. As final bit of advice and to echo what was said above, definitely make sure to get any medical conditions you have documented before you leave the service. If you have any conditions that qualify for disability, I’d recommend getting with a Veterans Service Officer to help you with the claim.


Damn I thought only the army had busted and old shit but goddamn I guess it's just a military thing.

Yeh I feel the same when it comes to whether or not I'm a good fit for the military. Back when I first joined and I just wanted to be used up and broken by the government it was decent but after some major life changes I got goals and dreams beyond being chewed and spat out. I've been lucky enough to not incur any serious chronic pain or injuries but I'll be sure to apply for anything else I qualify for.
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Collarbones
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Fri May 22, 2020 9:57 pm
Posts: 14
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2020 11:11 am 
 

last_eulogy wrote:
I did 9 years honorably in the Navy. I absolutely hated it at the time and despise it now. Some good things are I've been to 42 countries and was able to navigate/steer big giant war ships. Saw a million other cool things like missile launches, 5 inch gunfire and some other interesting things. They don't outweigh the assholes I had to deal with, no sleep literally for days (record is 72 hours), and long periods underway of no fresh water (drinking, showering, cooking) record for that is 24 days. I tried getting out, but realized my life was still shit and ended up reenlisting. I am now a 70 percenter through the VA. Among an experience of my first ship practically sawing a guy in half with an M60 "accidentally" I am damaged from participating in about 200 funeral details. A good chunk coming back from Iraq, which was in full swing at the time. Had zero mental health issues before I went in. I have destroyed countless friendships, relationships and marriages from my issues. Horrible anxiety and nightmares every night. I finally reached a point where I now have no one. Literally. destroyed every relationship. I went for counseling, but they locked me up. I wont go back. The VA can have all the money back for my sanity. I wish I had never ever gone in the military. My life was shit, but its shit now, except I have a house, nice car and money. Which mean nothing to me, compared to my lost sanity/love/friendsips.


Holy shit, man. That's fucking terrible. If you ever need someone to talk to you can pm me and I'll send you my contact info. Life is shit but you don't gotta go through it alone.
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BastardHead
Worse than Stalin

Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 7:53 pm
Posts: 9635
Location: St. Charles, Illinois
PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2020 7:52 pm 
 

Collarbones wrote:
BastardHead wrote:
Shortest version: I was in the Navy for about a month. I don't like the military, as an American I hated the idea of joining the World Police, but it was a last ditch effort to avoid living out of my car. Tried to join the Army first, got rejected because I've got a googly eye. Tried the Navy next and they didn't care. Still lied on my medical history and got busted a week into boot camp. Spent three weeks in Seps waiting to go home. Learned nothing, gained nothing, all in all just a really bizarre month long detour in my life. The best part was discovering the various reasons people were getting kicked out (personal favorite was the guy who had six toes on either feet so none of the boots fit, which is hilarious to me because he was probably a great swimmer). Other best part is that my reentry code is RE-04, which means I can never join again under any circumstances, even a draft. So whenever WWIII breaks out I'll be sitting in my apartment playing videogames and not shooting people.


When you say googly eye; do you mean you have a fake/glass eye or you got something like a lazy eye?


I call it a googly eye for the comedy factor, and the easiest way to explain it is a lazy eye, but even then that's not really it. It's called Duane's Syndrome, which basically just means some nerves don't connect so my left eye only barely has the ability to look to the right. If you looked straight at me I look fine, but if I want to I can make myself look like the Men at Work guy.
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praey
Metalhead

Joined: Sun Apr 20, 2008 1:33 am
Posts: 680
Location: United States
PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2020 7:58 pm 
 

Unorthodox wrote:
Both my best friends did the military. One is still in it, the other got discharged. The one who is still in it treats it like any other job. He's an engineer, but he's had to deploy in various places a few times (worst place being Afghanistan this last summer). Paid for his school, gives him a decent paycheck. Can't lie, seems like a pretty good gig.

If you play your cards right the military can be a pretty good deal. If I were to do it again I would have tried harder to get into a career speciality that offers a better quality of life. When I first joined I wanted to be a helicopter pilot, partially because it seemed cool and partially because aviators (and aviation technicians) seemed to have a pretty good living compared to other specialties. Unfortunately I quickly learned that I didn't like flying in helicopters and much preferred navigating ships, which ultimately led me to decide to pursue an afloat career path. In retrospect, I really wish I would have picked something else.

Collarbones wrote:
Yeh I feel the same when it comes to whether or not I'm a good fit for the military. Back when I first joined and I just wanted to be used up and broken by the government it was decent but after some major life changes I got goals and dreams beyond being chewed and spat out.

I hear that. My mindset and goals when I first joined were worlds apart from where they are now.

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Liquid_Braino
Metalhead

Joined: Wed Jun 17, 2009 10:25 am
Posts: 523
PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2020 8:02 am 
 

Joining the US Navy was one of the best things I did in life (got me out of a burgeoning cocaine addiction...still amazed I passed the drug test).

Getting kicked out of the Navy two years later for alcohol rehab failure was also one of the best things that ever happened to me (got me to refocus my life, leave the US and get educated).

The good outweighed the bad while I was in, as I made a lot of friends and partied a lot. I'll give the higher-ups props as they tried to reel in my boozing since I had a knack for fixing electronics, but my "high security clearance + tendency to black out during binges" didn't jibe.

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CoconutBackwards
Metalhead

Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2016 2:02 pm
Posts: 629
Location: Walled Lake, MI
PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2020 11:03 am 
 

BastardHead wrote:
Other best part is that my reentry code is RE-04, which means I can never join again under any circumstances, even a draft. So whenever WWIII breaks out I'll be sitting in my apartment playing videogames and not shooting people.


You win.
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OzzyApu
Metal freak

Joined: Fri Oct 13, 2006 12:11 am
Posts: 10485
Location: Seattle
PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2020 12:51 pm 
 

Did 8 years in the ol' US Army (reserves) from November 2007 to November 2015. Age 17 to age 25. Started E-1 and ended as an E-4. The best way I could describe it was a mixed experience.

On the one hand it paid for my university tuition, which was a big point of my joining in the first place. This at the tail end of tuition being cheap before it skyrocketed so I didn't have to be deployed to be able to cover it. Even then I did get a mobilization scare. I got injured on that mob so I ended up not going (it was for Afghanistan). Thankfully I had $0 college debut after all was said and done.

Anyway, I had high hopes of being a career officer and having something to show for, retiring after doing 20 years and being an accomplished person after a terrible 7 years in middle / high school. I needed something to unlock my potential and make something of myself, so by 15/16 I knew I was going into the military. My first choices were air force and navy but their offices were closed and I just had to get the ball rolling. Army was an option from the beginning but my parents, especially mom, were extremely against the idea of joining the military (remember that this was 2007 when Iraq and Afghanistan were really deadly). Anyway, I ended up compromising by joining the reserves and my recruiter got me in a non-combat MOS (25U - signal support specialist [think communications jack-of-all-trades]). Before graduating and going to basic I did get to workout at Century Link Field (literally on-field) so that was kinda cool. I took advantage of the next few months to train my body for basic training, which ended up working.

There's a whole lot I'm glossing over but lemme just get to Basic Training. It was cool and not cool. Shot my first weapon, met a very close friend, did a bunch of crappy marches, had a bad sick hall day, got through the gas chamber, etc. I won't go over the entire thing but it was at Fort Knox back when it was all-males and was definitely an experience of a lifetime. I still have the photobook and DVD somewhere. AIT was better since it had women. 21 weeks though at Fort Gordon, Georgia I got sick of that place. Got a few wild stories involving sex parties and trains amidst weeks of monotony and coms schooling. If only I knew to not blow all the money I had ever made up to that point on dumb shit. So many soldiers get their first real money at that time cause they're so young and they all blow it on dumb shit.

I get to my unit in January 2009 and it's the only real unit I was with for the next 5 years. Human resources in Snohomish County (I'm in King so it was a slog to drive back and forth). This is the place where my job title and enthusiasm for the military died. I saw so much bullshit office politics, financial mismanagement, unit morale dissolving, backstabbing NCOs, commander egos, racist assholes, time-wasting training, "mandatory fun" family days, and much more. I technically wasn't HR since it wasn't my MOS so I got stuck being in the middle not belonging to the mechanics platoon or main HR one. I did befriend each supply NCO which was a saving grace during my time there. It was years until I fully realized I was in what was known as a "jacked up unit". It was a real shithole that was never going to see me advance my career, never used me for what I trained for, never put me in a position to succeed, and despite making a good crew of friends a couple of years in - I couldn't leave. I was at the University of Washington which was also my dream and that part of my life was really good. You can't just leave a unit and get to pick where you go, so I had to ride it out, and by the time I understood I was never going to gel with the highly conservative / traditional core of the military ethos I wanted out.

It got to the point around 2011 when I started seriously not exercising or giving a shit about UCMJ (code of military justice). It got super close to me being general discharged (I even had the notice at one point) for failing APFT multiple times but they never followed through. I never got to go to any cool places, only dull ones like Ogden, Utah, Camp Rilea, and Fort McCoy, Wisconsin (twice!). Otherwise a ton of boring-ass JBLM (Joint Base Lewis McCord) trips, mostly for dumb errands and shooting range drill weekends. Turns out my goal of being an officer was the last thing I wanted. The job is utter hell. My second month in I was the designated commander's driver, which is the bitchiest position in a unit. What was worse was all the main commanders I was stuck with were goons. I remember the first guy I was stuck with, a major, was a complete egotistical asshole and I never liked being around him. When the other officers in your battalion conspire to frag your commanding officer, you know you have to get the fuck out of there. I was always away from my enlisted friends and surrounded by field grade officers (captains, majors, lt. colonels) so their world became my world. The second main guy (another major) was a tool but I have no memory of ever driving him because he was just odd. He was all about powerpoints - I remember my final 2 years (2012-2013 not IRR) being full of checklists, powerpoints, class sessions, more time with my enlisted friends, PMCS, and typical drill crap.

Main commanders were awful. I say "main commanders" because the interim commanders were always cool. The 1st lieutenants, captains, etc. who were so much more level-headed, so much more efficient, and far more down to earth. I remember a family day where a lieutenant and I were arguing about whether or not anal sex was gay (he said yes it was, I said no it wasn't) and we had to get our (female, btw) commander involved to get her in on it (she sided with me). Anyway, fast forward to 2013 and I was pretty much on my way into the Individual Ready Reserves (IRR), which is basically the pool of reservists who don't have to do any drill and are ready to process out. They sent some NCOs in 2015 to try and keep me in but by that point I had already graduated university, I had my hair grown out to my shoulders, and I couldn't give a shit about the officer position they were trying to convince me with. I ended up not reenlisting and flying to Korea to go teach English.

There's so much I skipped over and didn't talk about, but that's what I could put in a post right now. It really was a mixed experience that I wish worked out differently. I see the military as essential, but extremely inefficient. The US Army reserves, from my lone experience, is nowhere near as advanced, well-oiled, or competent in certain areas as people might believe. Half the vehicles in the JBLM depot were in no condition to run so I spent a whole summer (which was supposed to be for radio training) doing maintenance on them.

Anyway, I have to end this before this post gets even longer. Got my honorable discharge and I've been out for 5 years. Turns out reserves don't give you up-to-date DD-214s and they just revert to the ones you got after basic training. Fucking assholes.
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last_eulogy
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2003 4:17 pm
Posts: 16
PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2020 6:19 am 
 

I work with military people on a military base and a lot of people who were in the military like myself. The one thing I notice is almost everyone has sleeping issues. I guess it's the nature of the work. I have them and everyone I talk to that was in the military all have sleep issues. In the past 10 years I have slept straight through the night three times. All three times I couldn't believe it. I wake up completely exhausted. Now I take medication to at least help me fall asleep. I just don't stay asleep through the night.
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dheacock's wrote:

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Now for a higher level song like Moth Into Flame. I specifically remember getting in trouble at school for hearing this the day it was released for having my phone out and then defiantly saying to my teacher Fuck off Im listening to a new Metallica song

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