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flexodus
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2019 7:57 pm 
 

Any recommendations on where to start with Clark Ashton Smith? The best stories to watch out for, or preferably a quality collection/anthology? I vaguely remember his name being associated with the Cauldron Born debut, and I’ve been slowly dipping my toes into sci fi and fantasy lately.

Currently reading Moorcock’s Swords Trilogy. Was looking for Elric stuff at a used bookstore (inspired by Eternal Champion), and though I found this instead I’m enjoying it a lot. A few chapters into Queen of Swords now. Turns out the song “Retaliator” is based on this series, which is badass because it’s still EC’s best song to date!

Last book I read was King’s The Stand, which despite being fucking massive, was a true joy in every sense all the way through. Definitely up there with Misery as my favorite book by him, though I’m still prefer some of his short stories the most.
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failsafeman
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2019 10:37 pm 
 

BeholdtheNicktopus wrote:
@Razakel: Woops I am just reading the latest collection of the Elric stories (entitled "Chronicles of the Last Emperor of Melnibone", published by Ballantine I believe). Stormbringer is the last story in volume 1. They are arranged roughly in order of publication I think? So I already read that one. It definitely seemed, uh, like it was supposed to be the very very last thing. You don't come back from that one without a cosmic reset button for the story.

Yeah that's supposed to be the end. The stuff that was written later takes place before that. There's also a serious drop in quality in the stuff written after Stormbringer.
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Jonpo
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:18 am 
 

flexodus wrote:
Any recommendations on where to start with Clark Ashton Smith? The best stories to watch out for, or preferably a quality collection/anthology? I vaguely remember his name being associated with the Cauldron Born debut, and I’ve been slowly dipping my toes into sci fi and fantasy lately.


This is going to sound corny but honestly, start ANYWHERE. I think he's the best weird fiction writer by leaps and bounds. Not as visceral as Howard or as obscure as HPL, but he pushes the fantastical elements to their limits. He was an absolutely astounding artist, in multiple formats. Any collection of short stories you can find, start there.
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Razakel
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 12:53 pm 
 

While I don't quite share Jonpo's enthusiasm about the man, it's true you can start anywhere. I have the nice-looking Penguin Classics collection of his stuff, which is good, but hardly comprehensive since he wrote a pretty huge amount of stories if I'm not mistaken.

CAS is a lot of fun for the same reason his stuff can become annoying. He's far and away the most overblown and ridiculous writer of that "first wave" of Weird fiction pack. If a sentence can be said in 15 words, you can bet your ass he'll try his damnedest to say it in 70. His vocabulary is just insane though. My girlfriend and I like to read his stories aloud to each other while the one who isn't reading is looking up all the words we've never heard before. :lol:

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Jonpo
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 1:39 pm 
 

Razakel wrote:
My girlfriend and I like to read his stories aloud to each other while the one who isn't reading is looking up all the words we've never heard before. :lol:


This is the sweetest thing I've ever heard. I might see if my S.O. wants to try it. I'm 99% sure CAS makes up words on the fly sometimes. I know my other all-time favorite, Jack Vance, does the same.

If I had to choose ONE story to really capture the magic of CAS I'd probably recommend "The City of Singing Flame". It's on the longer side, and it's COMPLETELY ridiculous. It should not work. At all. It's literally a story about a weird fiction writer getting sucked into a weird fiction story. Doesn't that sound AWFUL? I thought so too but uhhh, he makes it work like no one's business.
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Grave_Wyrm
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 3:05 am 
 

Nahsil wrote:
The Big Sleep is good, and also The Name of the Rose.

Oblarg wrote:
Seconding

failsafeman wrote:
anything Raymond Chandler is top-notch. ... atmosphere and cynicism without every straying into self-parody territory.

Nice. Thanks, guys. I totally forgot that The Name of the Rose is a mystery. I'm actually reading Eco's On Literature. Interesting to read collections of essays and talks like this. He's um .. a pretty smart guy.

I could have been too narrow in my ask. I'm also broadly interested in books that lean on an element of investigation or exploration. Gene Wolfe's A Borrowed Man is a good example. Kraken, too.

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Azmodes
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 7:51 am 
 

I'm currently working my way through Prelude to Foundation. Was planning on doing the whole series in internal chronological order, but not sure if I'll go through with it. This one is alright, but also a bit tedious and slow. I guess I should definitely finish the original Foundation, though.

I kinda gave up on Cameron Pierce's Lost in Cat Brain Land story collection. Either it's him in particular or the whole bizarro thing in general just isn't for me. An accretion of OMG RANDOM CRAZY non-sequitur material that gets old pretty fast, not really much of a point or entertainment value to it that I could discern.

Chadwick's The Decipherment of Linear B is cool, if a bit dry towards the end.
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Thiestru
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:47 pm 
 

It's been a long time since I read Clark Ashton Smith, but I enjoyed pretty much everything. So just pick a story and go! I'm assuming you're already familiar with Algernon Blackwood? If not, you must read him too. He's easily my favorite after HPL, and at times he's his equal. Everyone knows 'The Willows' for the masterpiece it is, but too often overlooked is 'The Man Whom the Trees Loved', which is one of the strangest and saddest stories I've ever read in my life, and is definitely my no. 1 favorite Blackwood tale. I won't attempt to describe the plot, but the title tells you enough, and if it's not enough to lure you in, then I don't know what to say.
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flexodus
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 7:39 pm 
 

Thiestru wrote:
It's been a long time since I read Clark Ashton Smith, but I enjoyed pretty much everything. So just pick a story and go! I'm assuming you're already familiar with Algernon Blackwood? If not, you must read him too. He's easily my favorite after HPL, and at times he's his equal. Everyone knows 'The Willows' for the masterpiece it is, but too often overlooked is 'The Man Whom the Trees Loved', which is one of the strangest and saddest stories I've ever read in my life, and is definitely my no. 1 favorite Blackwood tale. I won't attempt to describe the plot, but the title tells you enough, and if it's not enough to lure you in, then I don't know what to say.

Thanks for the recommendation! I've actually never heard of him before but I'm definitely interested, and found a collection with both those stories in it. My girlfriend and I are drafting lists of gifts to get each other so we have something to consult on birthdays and anniversaries. So mine has a bunch of Conan and Blackwood paperbacks, and the first two volumes in the CAS "Collected Fantasies" series. One with "City of Singing Flame", the other with "The Last Incantation".
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 7:43 pm 
 

Finished The Village of Stepanchikovo by Dostoevsky a couple of days ago. Further into the book, it got a little "stagnant" but was still enjoyable.

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Thiestru
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 2:27 pm 
 

flexodus wrote:
Thiestru wrote:
It's been a long time since I read Clark Ashton Smith, but I enjoyed pretty much everything. So just pick a story and go! I'm assuming you're already familiar with Algernon Blackwood? If not, you must read him too. He's easily my favorite after HPL, and at times he's his equal. Everyone knows 'The Willows' for the masterpiece it is, but too often overlooked is 'The Man Whom the Trees Loved', which is one of the strangest and saddest stories I've ever read in my life, and is definitely my no. 1 favorite Blackwood tale. I won't attempt to describe the plot, but the title tells you enough, and if it's not enough to lure you in, then I don't know what to say.

Thanks for the recommendation! I've actually never heard of him before but I'm definitely interested, and found a collection with both those stories in it. My girlfriend and I are drafting lists of gifts to get each other so we have something to consult on birthdays and anniversaries. So mine has a bunch of Conan and Blackwood paperbacks, and the first two volumes in the CAS "Collected Fantasies" series. One with "City of Singing Flame", the other with "The Last Incantation".


Sure thing! Enjoy. :)
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BeholdtheNicktopus
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 2:38 pm 
 

failsafeman wrote:
Yeah that's supposed to be the end. The stuff that was written later takes place before that. There's also a serious drop in quality in the stuff written after Stormbringer.


Into volume 2 there were some pretty subpar stories, I really despised "Phase I", a "Jerry Cornelius" story included because he is supposed to basically be a remake of Elric. Man that story sucked ass. And a few others immediately after Stormbringer were not great.

But there are still cool things happening. I'm still holding out hope that in the 4 remaining volumes there's some cool heights reached again.
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 11:03 pm 
 

Currently, I'm reading Netochka Nezvanova and it is fantastic! So far, I think this just might be Dostoevsky's best work.

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Azmodes
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2019 11:15 am 
 

Almost done with the short novel/novella thingie The Freeze-Frame Revolution by Peter Watts. Awesome. Creatively dark shit going down in a deep time setting, just the sort of thought-provoking hard sci-fi I enjoy. I definitely have to dig into his output; next up Blindsight.
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2019 5:59 pm 
 

Finished Netochka Nezvanova a couple of hours ago. Man, it was a really good novel!

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2019 8:05 pm 
 

Can I get some recs for philosophical fiction novels?

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BeholdtheNicktopus
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2019 1:32 am 
 

What counts as "philosophical" fiction? Any literature that has deep themes, or something more specific (references to historical philosophers, overly conceptually determined by arguments or ideas from philosophy)? Fiction that philosophers like and draw from?
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waiguoren
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2019 2:40 am 
 

BeholdtheNicktopus wrote:
What counts as "philosophical" fiction?


Jorge Luis Borges I'd imagine.

R Scott Bakker's Prince of Nothing series (which, like most fantasy, is not that great) has a lot of philosophical references and allusions in it (I believe the author dropped out of a PhD in Philosophy). I distinctly recall a clear reference to Bertrand Russell's response to Frege's puzzles in the first book for example. Not sure if referencing works of philosophy counts as "philosophical fiction" or "author attempting to be smart fiction."
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Nahsil
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 2:11 am 
 

Sartre's Nausea? Camus's The Stranger? Tolstoy/Dostoevsky?
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InnesI
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 4:32 am 
 

Nahsil wrote:
Sartre's Nausea? Camus's The Stranger? Tolstoy/Dostoevsky?


Yes!

I can add Hesse's Steppenwolf (and perhaps Siddharta as well), Nietzsches Thus Spake Zarathustra and Ernst Jüngers Eumeswil.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 4:48 am 
 

I'm well aware of Tolstoy/Dostoevsky. I've read several books by those two authors and I love Russian literature.

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Grave_Wyrm
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2019 12:21 pm 
 

Philosophical fiction: Hesse's Demian is good. Eco's Foucault's Pendulum, though, is probably the top of my admittedly short philo-fic list.

Personally, I liked The Plague better than The Stranger.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2019 9:11 pm 
 

Currently, I'm reading Tolstoy's Childhood, Boyhood, and Youth. Not as interesting as I thought it would be.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2019 10:54 pm 
 

There are three sections in Tolstoy''s Childhood, Boyhood, and Youth. Right now, I'm on youth, the last section of the novel. I'm really starting to get into this book.

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darkeningday
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2019 12:47 pm 
 

Has there been much discussion on Kim Stanley Robinson in this thread? Just picked up his Mars trilogy; blown away so far.
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Azmodes
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2019 1:21 pm 
 

Blindsight was fucking awesome. "dark and cerebral", as TVTropes puts it. Or in Charles Stross' words "Imagine a neurobiology-obsessed version of Greg Egan writing a first contact with aliens story from the point of view of a zombie posthuman crewman aboard a starship captained by a vampire". Nasty page-turner stuff that makes you think, covering questions of consciousness, identity, intelligence, evolution and language/meaning all packaged into an exciting and brutal story. And on a random note that nonetheless needs to be pointed out, featuring the most insane form of camouflage anywhere ever.

darkeningday wrote:
Has there been much discussion on Kim Stanley Robinson in this thread? Just picked up his Mars trilogy; blown away so far.

I've only read a more recent book of his, Aurora. The Mars stuff is sort of on my reading list, but not very high up.
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failsafeman
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2019 7:34 pm 
 

darkeningday wrote:
Has there been much discussion on Kim Stanley Robinson in this thread? Just picked up his Mars trilogy; blown away so far.

I read the first one, was generally pretty favorably impressed. You can tell the focus was much more on the science and process of colonization than the characters or plot, though; once he came up with them, it seemed like he didn't really know where he wanted them to go. Still worth reading, and memorable enough that I can still remember big chunks after a few years. I've got the whole series and will finish it eventually, but not in any particular hurry.
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caspian
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2019 7:43 pm 
 

BeholdtheNicktopus wrote:
What counts as "philosophical" fiction? Any literature that has deep themes, or something more specific (references to historical philosophers, overly conceptually determined by arguments or ideas from philosophy)? Fiction that philosophers like and draw from?


aYn RaNd, rEaD aTlAs Shrugged

Seconding CAS love. I think HPL is better personally, but I've got all Smith's writing in those nightshade anthology thingos and I rather enjoy it, but I'm far more enamoured of his more Dunsany/Dying Earth-ish flights of imagination over the heap of "evil medieval" he did.


Just worked my way through what I understand is the best of Clive Barker, which was hit and miss with a few crackers along the way. Damnation Game was fun, Weaveworld was fairly good fantasy, Book of Blood has a few real crackers mixed with some fairly average short stories. Perhaps reading horror is more fun than I thought- happy to have some recommendations if anyone's got them. Currently going through Guy Gavriel Kay's Last Light of the Sun, and I'm surprised how much I enjoy it. I like his style and that essentially it's just a historical account of a fictional world rather than a fantasy quest.

Also bumbling my way through Reform or Revolution by Rosa Luxembourg, which is dense but good, and A Brief History of Neoliberalism by David Harvey, which is very informative but a) very dry and b) horribly depressing.

Azmodes wrote:
Blindsight was fucking awesome. "dark and cerebral", as TVTropes puts it. Or in Charles Stross' words "Imagine a neurobiology-obsessed version of Greg Egan writing a first contact with aliens story from the point of view of a zombie posthuman crewman aboard a starship captained by a vampire". Nasty page-turner stuff that makes you think, covering questions of consciousness, identity, intelligence, evolution and language/meaning all packaged into an exciting and brutal story. And on a random note that nonetheless needs to be pointed out, featuring the most insane form of camouflage anywhere ever.



Meh, it was OK. Like a lot of hard sci fi writers it was basically a guy forcing an idea that he thought was cool into a story. Egan's much better, as he has the writing to carry his ideas.

I mean, the ideas were cool. I would've been happy reading a non fiction book about the stuff. But it was a long, fairly tiresome read that I wouldn't have bothered with if it wasn't for me being stuck on a few flights.
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Hellenic_Heros
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2019 5:43 am 
 

Honestly late to the party, but currently reading Dmity Glukhovsky's METRO 203X series. Really good so far.

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Azmodes
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2019 6:04 am 
 

caspian wrote:
Azmodes wrote:
Blindsight was fucking awesome. "dark and cerebral", as TVTropes puts it. Or in Charles Stross' words "Imagine a neurobiology-obsessed version of Greg Egan writing a first contact with aliens story from the point of view of a zombie posthuman crewman aboard a starship captained by a vampire". Nasty page-turner stuff that makes you think, covering questions of consciousness, identity, intelligence, evolution and language/meaning all packaged into an exciting and brutal story. And on a random note that nonetheless needs to be pointed out, featuring the most insane form of camouflage anywhere ever.



Meh, it was OK. Like a lot of hard sci fi writers it was basically a guy forcing an idea that he thought was cool into a story. Egan's much better, as he has the writing to carry his ideas.

I mean, the ideas were cool. I would've been happy reading a non fiction book about the stuff. But it was a long, fairly tiresome read that I wouldn't have bothered with if it wasn't for me being stuck on a few flights.

I can be very forgiving when it comes to sci-fi and writing issues, as long as the ideas are nice and juicy. That being said, I actually thought Watts' writing is way above average. Certainly a notch above Egan's, who isn't incompetent or even mediocre, but let's face it, I don't read him for his language artistry and scintillating characters. I read his stuff because he does an amazing job of pushing scientific concepts and exotic thought experiments to great narrative extremes, but anchoring and greasing it up with enough straightforward storytelling and a knack for a down-to-earth elegance when it comes to presenting certain key points, ramifications and philosophical contexts of the concepts he's tackling. Usually, anyway. Sometimes the balance tips unfavourably; I had to put the Orthogonal stuff on hold midway through the second book, for instance, since it seemed to basically turn into one dry lecture by an interchangeable character after another.

In any event, Watts did a better job with characters and seems to have a more playful way with words and plot structure than Egan that I really appreciated. I can see what you mean when you say he was pretty much getting an idea out there with the novel format being a secondary layer, but even so the execution was great, with a lot of early hints and weird mysteries getting neatly tied up and shown in new lights as things progressed. I also found a lot of the surrounding concepts and the setting pretty cool on their own, not just the general ideas they represented. The whole thing was just vivid and scary in a way that kept occupying my mind inbetween reads. Planning on checking out Echopraxia, a non-sequel taking place on Earth during Blindsight, soon.
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James_1995
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 04, 2019 4:40 pm 
 

Currently reading:
"2666" Roberto Bolano
"Selected Stories" Raymond Carver
"Against the Day" Thomas Pynchon
Any thoughts on any of these?

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 8:17 pm 
 

Just finished Tolstoy's Childhood, Boyhood, Youth. Not his best novel but quite entertaining.

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InnesI
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 06, 2019 10:08 am 
 

caspian wrote:
aYn RaNd, rEaD aTlAs Shrugged


Rand is a classic philosophical fiction recommendation although I find her non-fictional writings more easily digested actually. She was not a very good fiction writer.

I guess one could also mention George Orwells 1984 and Pig Farm. Classics and very easy reads and very relevant in today's world. 1984 has so many similarities with today's society and while Pig Farm is a satire on communism it to is very relevant today.

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Amber Gray
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 08, 2019 5:25 pm 
 

Image

Jacob's Folly by Rebecca Miller, 2013

What a marvelous book. Vaguely reminiscent of Jerusalem in some ways albeit toned down comparatively by like 600%, simply because that book is more expansive than some galaxies. But this one brought me great pleasure and satisfaction and had me a bit connected in a personal way.

Tells the story of a reincarnated Jewish street peddler turned valet turned high ranking socialite and his mischievous plans to at once bring down a modern good Samaritan and persuade a new Jewish lady of interest to toss tradition in favor of desire. Of course these lives eventually intersect, intertwined with our main character's recollection of his past life and its rise and perpetual fall from grace by way of death.

I found the young girl's story the most moving and interesting, being raised heavily Jewish, but overcoming the boring traditions of the past to pursue greater and more contemporary things. Thus a whole new world is shaped around her.

But all of it is great, I related to the historical narrative the main character rising above poverty and despair three times over. Ambitious, touching, droll, and highly insightful.
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BeholdtheNicktopus
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 2:27 am 
 

Well, I am now on the last of the 6 volumes of the "Chronicles of the Last Emperor of Melnibone" Elric saga. I honestly think my favorites have been "The Sailor on the Seas of Fate" and "Elric of Melnibone". (And "Stormbringer of course... but the writing got really good by Sailor.)

"The Fortress of the Pearl" was interesting. From much later (published 1989 I guess, 15 years after Sailor?). The writing is quite different, Elric seems almost like a different character (kept saying "madam" in every sentence he said to the dreamthief). Fantastic writing in general, but a quite different vibe and focus. I guess Elric didn't remember fucking ANYTHING about the dream couches, huh? Well, gonna do the last novel soon. Woop.
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Earthcubed
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 4:22 pm 
 

I recently finished The Land Across by Gene Wolfe. In terms of prose, this one definitely reads easier than any of the other 7 Wolfe works I've read (counting the various Sun volumes as four books, rather than 12). At times the prose was almost annoyingly simple; the narrator is a very plain-spoken writer of travel guides.

The narrator knows of a country, never named, which is almost impossible to get to and from which almost no visitor ever leaves, so naturally he wants to be the first person to write a travel guide about this country. He is quickly imprisoned for no real reason, then placed under a kind of house arrest. Over the course of the next 250 pages he is drawn into a multipolar conflict involving rebel groups, the secret police, the church, satanists. It's part Kafka, part detective/espionage story, with some very lupine twists.

All in all I liked it, but as is always the case with Wolfe there's a "what just happened in the last 40 pages" feeling once I finished that I still haven't shook off. I thought I had a pretty good handle on the surface level plot until the last three chapters. There's two characters in particular who seem like they were taken straight out of Book of the New Sun and who seem very out of place here, yet are also very important.
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iamntbatman wrote:
On Friday I passed an important milestone in my teaching career: a student shat himself

FloristOfVampyrism wrote:
That wasn't meant as a k.o. though, he specifically targeted an area of the cerebellum which, if ruptured, renders you a Jehovah's witness indefinitely

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Cauldron_Born
Metal newbie

Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2007 6:38 pm
Posts: 191
PostPosted: Wed Mar 20, 2019 2:49 pm 
 

Jonpo wrote:
flexodus wrote:
Any recommendations on where to start with Clark Ashton Smith? The best stories to watch out for, or preferably a quality collection/anthology? I vaguely remember his name being associated with the Cauldron Born debut, and I’ve been slowly dipping my toes into sci fi and fantasy lately.


This is going to sound corny but honestly, start ANYWHERE. I think he's the best weird fiction writer by leaps and bounds. Not as visceral as Howard or as obscure as HPL, but he pushes the fantastical elements to their limits. He was an absolutely astounding artist, in multiple formats. Any collection of short stories you can find, start there.


I mentioned Clark Ashton Smith's fiction in the notes on my lyrics in the Born of the Cauldron booklet. I am a little late in finding this post, but for what it's worth I would recommend you start with Smith's TALES OF ZOTHIQUE. The Zothique stories are his darkest and most imaginative works. I think they will appeal to most metal heads who are fans of sword-and-sorcery. After that I recommend THE BOOK OF HYPERBOREA.

I will also mention that I have a collection of my own sword-and-sorcery tales titled, THE SNAKE-MAN'S BANE available on Amazon and bandcamp now. Some of the stories feature the Cauldron Born mascot, Thorn.

There is also a Thorn miniature now available on my bandcamp page:
Cauldron Born mascot,Thorn miniature now available!

https://cauldronborn1.bandcamp.com/merc ... -miniature

Howie

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Nahsil
Clerical Sturmgeschütz

Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2006 2:06 pm
Posts: 4463
Location: United States
PostPosted: Thu Mar 21, 2019 1:19 am 
 

I'm reading Brian Catling's The Vorrh and it's interesting. It's got shades of Wolfe and Mieville in the writing/plot/characterization. It took me a while to get into it, but at around 70 pages I'm finally invested. I can't actually decide sometimes if the writing is always top notch, but it does have those surreal descriptions that Wolfe/Mieville fans will enjoy. I do think his prose is a bit clunky at times, apparently Catling is a sculptor and does other physical arts stuff, and I feel like it carries over that language isn't his FIRST expertise, but he does a good job regardless, scratches that itch, with moments of very cool description.
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Razakel
Nekroprince

Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 8:36 pm
Posts: 5541
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Thu Mar 21, 2019 3:06 am 
 

Hell yeah! I absolutely adore The Vorrh. Read it a couple times and it's just amazing. The second book let me down a bit but the third was fantastic. First is still the best though. Catling has another book coming out this year called Earwig that I can't wait for.

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Earthcubed
The Great Fearmonger

Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2004 3:44 am
Posts: 3713
Location: eccaira nare epë Anar
PostPosted: Thu Mar 21, 2019 7:13 am 
 

Well, for the first time in a few years, I'm reading a book I've already read before. I used to read The Silmarillion every 18 months or so, and it's been about 3 years since I've last read it, so I started it up again. Still my favorite of the big three works of Tolkien. In some ways it's the purest Tolkien work, even with the editing by his son, because it really plays to his strengths (myth, invented language, history, the sense of deep time) while de-emphasizing his weaknesses (dialogue/relatable dialogue).
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iamntbatman wrote:
On Friday I passed an important milestone in my teaching career: a student shat himself

FloristOfVampyrism wrote:
That wasn't meant as a k.o. though, he specifically targeted an area of the cerebellum which, if ruptured, renders you a Jehovah's witness indefinitely

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