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nightbreaker33
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Jan 25, 2016 11:20 am
Posts: 390
PostPosted: Thu Oct 29, 2020 12:13 pm 
 

Hello, I recently found a tone that I dig for my guitar. The problem is, that there is a lot of fuzz in the background even though I don't have the distortion too much high. Here's some photos and audio so you can give me your opinion and ways to erase the fuzz on pro tools.

https://vocaroo.com/1hThU9Fd9glY

Plugins and settings:

https://ibb.co/sJfJww2
https://ibb.co/dgB2sRH
https://ibb.co/nmvWLm0

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Element_man
Metalhead

Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2005 2:37 am
Posts: 991
Location: Vancouver, Canada
PostPosted: Thu Oct 29, 2020 12:27 pm 
 

If I'm reading this correctly, you're not using any actual amp/cabinet simulation. You're just running your guitar directly into pedal plugins, yes?

That's probably your issue. A naked guitar DI sounds pretty lame on it's own and all you're doing is adding a bucket of overdrive and dirt to the signal chain. I would pick up an actual amp sim with a cabinet emulation stage and use that instead. You can use the Overdrive Pedal and whatever else if you need more juice. When using an overdrive pedal into an amp, I would suggest turning the "level" up the max and the "overdrive" to zero, then add it back to taste.

I would suggest:

Emissary by Ignite Amps
Crunk V2 by Nembrini Audio
Amped Roots Free by ML Sound Lab

All of these are free and will sound immediately better than what you've got now.

Also, tune your fucking guitar and develop consistency in your pick attack/palm mutes. If you can't get that right, no software will help you. God won't help you.

Best of luck!
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nightbreaker33
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Jan 25, 2016 11:20 am
Posts: 390
PostPosted: Thu Oct 29, 2020 2:47 pm 
 

Element_man wrote:
If I'm reading this correctly, you're not using any actual amp/cabinet simulation. You're just running your guitar directly into pedal plugins, yes?

That's probably your issue. A naked guitar DI sounds pretty lame on it's own and all you're doing is adding a bucket of overdrive and dirt to the signal chain. I would pick up an actual amp sim with a cabinet emulation stage and use that instead. You can use the Overdrive Pedal and whatever else if you need more juice. When using an overdrive pedal into an amp, I would suggest turning the "level" up the max and the "overdrive" to zero, then add it back to taste.

I would suggest:

Emissary by Ignite Amps
Crunk V2 by Nembrini Audio
Amped Roots Free by ML Sound Lab

All of these are free and will sound immediately better than what you've got now.

Also, tune your fucking guitar and develop consistency in your pick attack/palm mutes. If you can't get that right, no software will help you. God won't help you.

Best of luck!


Hmm with that way the "sea waves" will be erased you think huh? I'll try it for real and see on Pro Tools. Also yes, I didn't add a amp plugin sim on that recording beucause instead of sea waves, I get Cicadas sounds when I use the "heavy" preset which are much more irritating XD. But now that I think about it, If I add an amp plugin on clean channel, then add the pedals I might get a better tone. Also, I wonder what dynamics plugin do I need to erase the sea waves.

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pyratebastard
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Sat Mar 16, 2019 9:05 pm
Posts: 26
Location: San Diego, CA, USA
PostPosted: Tue Dec 15, 2020 10:09 am 
 

Element_man wrote:
Also, tune your fucking guitar and develop consistency in your pick attack/palm mutes. If you can't get that right, no software will help you. God won't help you.


The best advice in the world.
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DrudgeDread
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2016 11:38 pm
Posts: 16
Location: United States
PostPosted: Wed Dec 16, 2020 1:55 am 
 

"Sea" sounds normally imply pink noise, which is present in all of the electronic devices. In the electronics world this is known as 1/f noise or shot noise.
That particular noise source will always be there, and your objective when you record is to maximize your signal such that it "outshines" the noise source. This is called your Signal-To-Noise Ratio in the engineering world.

These are my short tips

1: are you using a recording interface? This may seem like a dumb question but I think we all start by trying to plug our guitar into the microphone jack of a computer. While that will allow you to record *something*, your microphone jack is optimized for PC mics, not a guitar. If you aren't, look for one, you can get them used for around 40 bucks and it will basically replace your computers soundcard and microphone input with purpose built electronics for recording. The Presonus USB96 is a common one that is often on craigslist and it works *great* when you are just starting out.

2: Are you actually using a DI? That is a box that converts your guitars output impedance such that it interacts with the recording interface similar to a microphone. Its important to match the impedance so all of the signal your guitar is generating actually makes it to the preamps and converters in the signal chain. Most DI boxes will have a 1/4 jack for your guitar input, another one for a signal pass-thru (so you can send that signal to other pedals and such), and an XLR jack to connect the now line-level signal to your recording interface. This *may* work if you are using the microphone jack on your computer and improve the situation without an interface. In either case, both a DI box AND an interface are key to getting a clean guitar signal for processing in your DAW.

3: Guitar Level - Max it out

4: Input Pre-amp - crank the gain as high as you can such that it does not clip (go into the red) when you strum and chug really hard. you want a big signal with zero distortion such that it comes out above the noise. Most recording interfaces will have an input level indicator on the front panel that will show you this, I tend to trust that more than the level indicator on the track in your DAW (still use that though). Since the recording interfaces preamp is the first bit of electronics your signal is going to see, you want that gain to be as high as it can be without distorting to help it stand out against any additional noise sources it may run into. All electronic amplifiers will have Pink Noise, and as the signal hits more amplifiers, all of that noise starts to add up. In the recording sense, you want this gain as early as possible.

5: Cable length - As cables get longer, and I mean excessively long, they start to do wacky things with the impedance matching. Best to keep as short as practically possible

hopefully this helps. I apologize if any of it comes off the wrong way, but your original post was a little light in the details as far as your current setup is concerned.

As far as plug-ins go, its certainly possible some of them can be contributing. But I would focus on the stuff that actually touches your signal first
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Awblaster
Metalhead

Joined: Mon Feb 08, 2010 6:07 pm
Posts: 613
Location: United Kingdom
PostPosted: Thu Dec 17, 2020 11:57 pm 
 

nightbreaker33 wrote:
even though I don't have the distortion too much high.


You literally maxed out the overdrive on the Tubescreamer plugin.

Use a proper amp sim. Does Pro Tools still have Guitar Rig as a stock plugin?

And yeah, what everyone else has said is correct too.
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nightbreaker33
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Jan 25, 2016 11:20 am
Posts: 390
PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2021 7:36 am 
 

DrudgeDread wrote:
"Sea" sounds normally imply pink noise, which is present in all of the electronic devices. In the electronics world this is known as 1/f noise or shot noise.
That particular noise source will always be there, and your objective when you record is to maximize your signal such that it "outshines" the noise source. This is called your Signal-To-Noise Ratio in the engineering world.

These are my short tips

1: are you using a recording interface? This may seem like a dumb question but I think we all start by trying to plug our guitar into the microphone jack of a computer. While that will allow you to record *something*, your microphone jack is optimized for PC mics, not a guitar. If you aren't, look for one, you can get them used for around 40 bucks and it will basically replace your computers soundcard and microphone input with purpose built electronics for recording. The Presonus USB96 is a common one that is often on craigslist and it works *great* when you are just starting out.

2: Are you actually using a DI? That is a box that converts your guitars output impedance such that it interacts with the recording interface similar to a microphone. Its important to match the impedance so all of the signal your guitar is generating actually makes it to the preamps and converters in the signal chain. Most DI boxes will have a 1/4 jack for your guitar input, another one for a signal pass-thru (so you can send that signal to other pedals and such), and an XLR jack to connect the now line-level signal to your recording interface. This *may* work if you are using the microphone jack on your computer and improve the situation without an interface. In either case, both a DI box AND an interface are key to getting a clean guitar signal for processing in your DAW.

3: Guitar Level - Max it out

4: Input Pre-amp - crank the gain as high as you can such that it does not clip (go into the red) when you strum and chug really hard. you want a big signal with zero distortion such that it comes out above the noise. Most recording interfaces will have an input level indicator on the front panel that will show you this, I tend to trust that more than the level indicator on the track in your DAW (still use that though). Since the recording interfaces preamp is the first bit of electronics your signal is going to see, you want that gain to be as high as it can be without distorting to help it stand out against any additional noise sources it may run into. All electronic amplifiers will have Pink Noise, and as the signal hits more amplifiers, all of that noise starts to add up. In the recording sense, you want this gain as early as possible.

5: Cable length - As cables get longer, and I mean excessively long, they start to do wacky things with the impedance matching. Best to keep as short as practically possible

hopefully this helps. I apologize if any of it comes off the wrong way, but your original post was a little light in the details as far as your current setup is concerned.

As far as plug-ins go, its certainly possible some of them can be contributing. But I would focus on the stuff that actually touches your signal first


Yes, I'm using a recording interface by Focusrite that's why I get almost 0 latency with my guitar parts. I might get a DI before doing research first though I'd prefer to do things as low-budget as possible. I also noticed when you increase the threshold and add some pre-delay on the Eleven Lite plugin some of the fuzz just disappears but there is still some in there slightly. Also because the guitar I'm playing here has 3 -single coils, perhaps the structure plays any role in that?? I made a song with the exact same settings and it came out with very little fuzz except for some parts which I had a guitar play the solos with an additional fuzz pedal.

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DrudgeDread
Mallcore Kid

Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2016 11:38 pm
Posts: 16
Location: United States
PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2021 2:31 pm 
 

I still say a DI could solve a lot of your issues, If you notice that the issue is reduced when you have a pedal between your guitar and your interface (this only applies if the pedal is NOT true bypass, this is because these pedals typically have a buffer), it may be reducing the output impedance such that it starts to act more like a line-level signal.

I would check ebay and craigslist for a cheap passive DI, you can get them for like 20 bucks. you dont need anything amazing to get you by most situations.
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Basilysk - https://basilysk.bandcamp.com
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nightbreaker33
Metal newbie

Joined: Mon Jan 25, 2016 11:20 am
Posts: 390
PostPosted: Tue Apr 20, 2021 9:55 am 
 

Quote:
You literally maxed out the overdrive on the Tubescreamer plugin.


I meant I use the clean channel for the eleven-lite amp plugin with 0 distortion.

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